Chief of the Royal Danish Army

The Chief of the Army Command is the service chief of the Royal Danish Army. The current chief is Major general Gunner Arpe Nielsen.[2]

Chief of the Army Command
Chef for Hærkommandoen
Coat of arms of the Royal Danish Army.svg
Incumbent
Gunner Arpe Nielsen

since 15 May 2021
 Royal Danish Army
Member ofDefence Command of Denmark
Reports to Chief of Defence
Term lengthNo fixed length
PrecursorChief of the Army Operational Command
Formation1 April 1923 (historical)
1 October 2014 (current)
First holderEllis Wolff [da] as Chief of the General Command
DeputyDeputy Chief of the Army Command
Salarykr. 90,000[a]
WebsiteOfficial Website

HistoryEdit

From the time that absolutism was instituted in 1660 until around 1800, the Monarch had absolute control of the military.[3] Commands of armies could be delegated to designated generals in times of war. As such, general commands would occasionally be established in Norway and the Duchies.[3] During the Scanian War and the Great Northern War there were a total of 19 Supreme Generals, as the commanders served at the King's pleasure.[4]

In the beginning of the English Wars, Crown Prince Frederick established general commands throughout Denmark.[b] Initially, they had limited power and were planned to be disbanded after the war, it was however decided to keep them.[5] Following the ascension of Christian VIII, the general commands' power and authority were expanded to exceed real military control.[6] This led to a change in the overall command structure, as the field commanders and chiefs of the general commands held the same authority. This problem came to light during the First Schleswig War and the appointment of Hans Hedemann [da] as the commander of the field army (Danish: Nørrejyske Armékorps).[7] Since Hedemann did not have any control within general command areas, there were often conflicts between him and the chiefs of those commands.[8] On 27 March 1849, Gerhard Christoph von Krogh who earlier had replaced Hedemann, was named supreme commander of "the entire active Army and over the fortifications and batteries in Jutland, on Als and on Funen as well as army magazines and depots set up in those areas".[8] Additionally, it was stipulated that "the active army in all respects was to be independent of the General Commands, which [...] were to assist the army when it was either wholly or partly in the General Command District.[8] While this arrangement ensured there would be no conflict between the supreme commander and the general commands, there were still no unified peacetime commander.

From 1855, there were 3 general commands; 1st General Command responsible for Zealand and surrounding islands, 2nd General Command for North Jutland, Funen and Schleswig, and 3rd General Command for Holstein and Saxe-Lauenburg.[9] Following the loss of the duchies in the Second Schleswig War, 3rd General Command was disbanded and 2nd General Command area was reduced.[9] In the 1905 Defence Agreement, it was decided that the chief of the 1st General Command would act as Army Commander-in-Chief in case of war.[9]

With the 1922 Defence Agreement, the Army was subjugated to large cuts. As a result, 1st and 2nd General Command were merged to create the General Command, and thereby creating the first unified peacetime army commander.[6][10]

With the creation of the Defence Staff and Chief of Defence, the General Command was replaced by the Army Command.[11] After the Army Command was subjugated to the Defence Command in 1976, the Army Command changed name to the Army Staff.[11] In 1982, the title of Chief of the Army was changed to become Inspector of the Army.[12] Following the 1988 Defence Commission, it was decided that the Army Staff and the positions of Inspector would be removed and then create the Army Operational Command.[13][14] Following the Danish Defence Agreement 2013–17, the Army Operational Command was disbanded and reorganised into the Army Staff. As part of the Danish Defence Agreement 2018–23, the Danish name was changed Army Command.[15]

List of chiefsEdit

Supreme Generals (1848–1932)Edit

First Schleswig War
No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
1   Major general
Gerhard Christoph von Krogh
(1785–1860)
27 March 1849 12 April 1849 16 days [16]
2   Major general
Frederik Bülow [da]
(1791–1858)
12 April 1849 24 May 1849 42 days [17]
(1)   Major general
Gerhard Christoph von Krogh
(1785–1860)
24 May 1849 2 July 1850 1 year, 39 days [18]
Second Schleswig War
No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
1de Meza, ChristianChristian de Meza
(1792–1865)
25 December 18636 February 186443 days[19]
Lüttichau, MathiasMathias Lüttichau [da]
(1795–1870)
Acting
6 February 186428 February 186423 days[20]
2Gerlach, GeorgGeorg Gerlach [da]
(1797–1865)
29 February 18644 July 1864125 days[21]
3Steinmann, PeterPeter Frederik Steinmann [da]
(1812–1894)
4 July 18641 November 1864150 days[22]
World War I
No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
1   Lieutenant general
Vilhelm Gørtz [da]
(1852–1939)
1 August 1914 3 August 1917 3 years, 2 days [23][24]
2   Lieutenant general
August Tuxen [da]
(1853–1929)
6 August 1917 5 May 1918 272 days [24][25]
[26]
3   Lieutenant general
Ellis Wolff [da]
(1856–1938)
5 May 1918 31 March 1919 330 days [24][27]

Chief of the General Command (1923–1926)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
1Wolff, EllisLieutenant general
Ellis Wolff [da]
(1856–1938)
1 April 192319 October 19263 years, 183 days[28][29]
2Nyholm, AndersLieutenant general
Anders Gjedde Nyholm
(1861–1939)
20 October 192631 July 19314 years, 303 days[30][31]
3With, ErikLieutenant general
Erik With [da]
(1869–1959)
1 August 19311 December 19398 years, 122 days[32][33]
4Prior, WilliamLieutenant general
William Wain Prior
(1876–1946)
1 December 193928 August 19411 year, 270 days[32][34]
[35]
5Gørtz, EbbeLieutenant general
Ebbe Gørtz [da]
(1886–1976)
29 August 194130 September 19509 years, 32 days[36]

Chief of the Army Command (1950–1970)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
1Gørtz, EbbeLieutenant general
Ebbe Gørtz [da]
(1886–1976)
1 October 19503 July 1951275 days[36]
2Møller, ErikLieutenant general
Erik C.V. Møller [da]
(1896–1972)
4 July 195130 June 19575 years, 362 days[37]
3Hjalf, ViggoLieutenant general
Viggo Hjalf [da]
(1900–1985)
1 July 195730 June 19602 years, 365 days[38]
4Jacobsen, ValdemarLieutenant general
Valdemar Jacobsen
(1902–1987)
1 July 196031 July 19677 years, 30 days[39][40]
5Blixenkrone-Møller, OttoLieutenant general
Otto Blixenkrone-Møller [da]
(1912–2006)
1 August 196731 December 19692 years, 152 days[41]

Chief of the Army Staff (1970–1990)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
Chief of the Army
(Chefen for Hæren)
1Blixenkrone-Møller, OttoLieutenant general
Otto Blixenkrone-Møller [da]
(1912–2006)
1 January 197030 November 19722 years[41]
2Vegger, ChristianMajor general
Christian Vegger [da]
(1915–1992)
1 December 197219763–4 years[42]
3Boysen, HaraldMajor general
Harald Martin Hermann Boysen
(1922–2019)
197630 June 19825–6 years[43]
Inspector of the Army
(Inspektøren for Hæren)
1Boysen, HaraldMajor general
Harald Martin Hermann Boysen
(1922–2019)
1 July 198219874–5 years[43]
2Essemann, J.Major general
Jørgen Christian Essemann
(born 1933)
198719902–3 years[44]
3Hillingsø, KjeldMajor general
Kjeld Hillingsø
(born 1935)
199031 December 19900 years[45]

Chief of the Army Operational Command (1991–2014)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
1Hillingsø, KjeldMajor general
Kjeld Hillingsø
(born 1935)
1 January 199119931–2 years[45]
2Kandborg, Ole LarsenMajor general
Ole Larsen Kandborg
(born 1941)
199319973–4 years[46]
3Grüner, GustavMajor general
Gustav Grüner
(born 1944)
199719980–1 years[47]
4Helsø, Hans JesperMajor general
Hans Jesper Helsø
(born 1948)
199827 September 20001–2 years[48]
5Scharling, JanMajor general
Jan Scharling
(born 1946)
27 September 200027 September 20022 years, 0 days[48]
6Kiærskou, PoulMajor general
Poul Kiærskou [da]
(born 1954)
27 September 200214 January 20096 years, 109 days[49][50]
7Bundsgaard, Niels HenrikMajor general
Niels Henrik Bundsgaard
(born 1957)
15 January 200930 June 20101 year, 166 days[51]
8Rokos, AgnerMajor general
Agner Rokos [da]
(born 1958)
1 July 201031 March 20132 years, 273 days[52]
9Ludvigsen, PerMajor general
Per Ludvigsen [da]
(born 1957)
1 April 20131 October 20141 year, 183 days[53]

Chief of the Army Staff (2014–2018)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
1Mathiesen, Hans-ChristianMajor general
Hans-Christian Mathiesen
(born 1965)
1 October 201424 October 20184 years, 23 days[54][55]
[56]
Christensen, Keld RobertColonel
Keld Robert Christensen
(born 1963)
Acting
24 October 201831 December 201868 days[56][57]

Chief of the Army Command (2019–present)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Ref.
Took office Left office Time in office
Christensen, Keld RobertColonel
Keld Robert Christensen
(born 1963)
Acting
1 January 201931 January 201930 days[56][58]
Pedersen, KennethMajor general
Kenneth Pedersen [da]
(born 1968)
Acting
31 January 20191 September 2019213 days[59]
1Lollesgaard, MichaelMajor general
Michael Lollesgaard
(born 1960)
1 September 20191 April 20211 year, 212 days[60][61]
Nielsen, GunnerBrigadier general
Gunner Arpe Nielsen
Acting
1 April 202115 May 202144 days[61]
2Nielsen, GunnerMajor general
Gunner Arpe Nielsen
15 May 2021Incumbent124 days[2]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Based on Hans-Christian Mathiesen's salary while on administrative leave.[1]
  2. ^ Except for Zealand, where Frederick remained in control.

ReferencesEdit

Citations
  1. ^ /ritzau/ 2020.
  2. ^ a b Forsvarskommandoen 2021b.
  3. ^ a b Gram-Andersen 2000, p. 31.
  4. ^ Rockstroh 1935, p. 268.
  5. ^ Generalstabens Kommandoafdeling 1935, p. 97.
  6. ^ a b Generalstabens Kommandoafdeling 1935, p. 98.
  7. ^ Rockstroh 1935, p. 258.
  8. ^ a b c Rockstroh 1935, p. 259.
  9. ^ a b c Gram-Andersen 2000, p. 32.
  10. ^ Olsen 1985, p. 16.
  11. ^ a b Hillingsø 2009.
  12. ^ arma-dania.dk.
  13. ^ Folketinget 1990.
  14. ^ Forsvaret 1989.
  15. ^ DSM.
  16. ^ Rockstroh 1935, pp. 260–261.
  17. ^ Rockstroh 1935, pp. 261–262.
  18. ^ Rockstroh 1935, p. 263.
  19. ^ Rockstroh 1935, p. 264.
  20. ^ Bjerg, Hans Christian. "Mathias Lüttichau". Dansk Biografisk Leksikon (in Danish) (3 ed.). Retrieved 22 August 2018.
  21. ^ Rockstroh 1935, p. 265.
  22. ^ Rockstroh 1935, p. 266.
  23. ^ Clemmesen 1982, pp. 3–3.
  24. ^ a b c Østergaard.
  25. ^ Linvald 1929, p. 294.
  26. ^ Clemmesen 1982, pp. 6–9, 6–11.
  27. ^ Clemmesen 1982, p. 6-11.
  28. ^ Olsen 1985, pp. 16, 30.
  29. ^ Koefoed 1938.
  30. ^ Olsen 1985, pp. 30, 43.
  31. ^ Ramm 1939.
  32. ^ a b Olsen 1985, pp. 30, 112.
  33. ^ Bjerg n.d.
  34. ^ Clemmesen 1982, p. III-3.
  35. ^ Bjerregaard 1946.
  36. ^ a b Wolff n.d.
  37. ^ Wolff, E. H. "Erik C.V. Møller". Dansk Biografisk Leksikon (in Danish) (3 ed.). Gyldendal. Retrieved 20 August 2018.
  38. ^ Kirchhoff 2020.
  39. ^ Berg 1979.
  40. ^ Fabritius 1963, p. 282.
  41. ^ a b Bjerg, Hans Christian. "Otto Blixenkrone-Møller". Dansk Biografisk Leksikon (in Danish) (3 ed.). Gyldendal. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  42. ^ Hillingsø, Kjeld. "Christian Vegger". Dansk Biografisk Leksikon (in Danish) (3 ed.). Gyldendal. Retrieved 28 August 2018.
  43. ^ a b Exner 2002.
  44. ^ "Fordelingsliste for opfording til medlemskab af Forenignen for tilvejebringelse og udstilling af kastellets historiske samling" (PDF). kastelletsvenner.dk (in Danish). 6 October 1987. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 September 2018. Retrieved 30 August 2018.
  45. ^ a b Berlingske 2010.
  46. ^ Exner 2001.
  47. ^ Stenstrup 2001.
  48. ^ a b Brøndum 1999.
  49. ^ Brøndum 2014.
  50. ^ NATO (9 June 2010). "Lieutenant General Poul Kiaerskou". NATO. Retrieved 21 August 2018.
  51. ^ Ministry of Defence (2015). "Curriculum Vitae - Niels Henrik Bundsgaard" (PDF). Forsvarsministeriet (in Danish). Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 August 2018. Retrieved 21 August 2018.
  52. ^ /ritzau/ 2018.
  53. ^ Forsvaret n.d.
  54. ^ "CURRICULUM VITAE: H.-C. Mathiesen" (PDF) (in Danish). 2019. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 January 2019. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  55. ^ Danish Defence. "Hærstaben". Forsvaret (in Danish). Archived from the original on 2 September 2018. Retrieved 27 August 2018.
  56. ^ a b c Forsvarskommandoen 2018.
  57. ^ "Curriculum Viltae - Keld Robert Christensen" (PDF). forsvaret.dk (in Danish). 4 July 2016. Retrieved 24 October 2018.
  58. ^ "Curriculum Viltae - Keld Robert Christensen" (PDF). forsvaret.dk (in Danish). 4 July 2016. Retrieved 24 October 2018.
  59. ^ Forsvarskommandoen 2019a.
  60. ^ Forsvarskommandoen 2019b.
  61. ^ a b Forsvarskommandoen 2021a.
Bibliography