Charles Lloyd (organ builder)

Advertisement from the Illustrated Guide to the Church Congress 1897

Charles Lloyd (8 September 1835 - 8 October 1908)[1] was a pipe organ builder based in Nottingham who flourished between 1859 and 1908.[2]

FamilyEdit

He was born in London on 8 September 1835, the son of Samuel Lloyd a shoemaker. He was baptised on 18 March 1838 in St Pancras New Church. In 1851, aged 15, he was described as "apprentice organ builder".

He married Mary Ann Dennison (b ca. 1841 in Nottingham) in 1864.

BackgroundEdit

Charles Lloyd had previously worked for Samuel Groves of London. Lloyd set up in business first with Lorenzo Valentine and shortly afterwards with Alfred Dudgeon. Their workshop was at 52A Union Road, near the centre of Nottingham. The company Valentine and Dudgeon was started in 1859. They were soon at work installing organs in places of worship in and around the Nottingham area. Lloyd was commissioned by Sydney Pierrepont, 3rd Earl Manvers of Holme Pierrepont, to construct and exhibit a two manual and pedal organ at the Birmingham Trades Exhibition in 1865. It won Lloyd a gold medal award for its workmanship and tone. After the exhibition, the organ was moved back to Nottingham and installed in St. Edmund's Church, Holme Pierrepont.

Charles Lloyd & Co.Edit

Lloyd & Dudgeon were partners until the death of Albert Dudgeon on 6 February 1874.[3] The company name was then changed to Charles Lloyd & Co., Church Organ Builders, Nottingham.

When the Great Central Railway was brought to Nottingham in 1896, land occupied by the Lloyd business had to be cleared to make way for the Victoria Station. Lloyd moved to 79 Brighton Street, St Ann’s.

In 1909, his son, Charles Frederick Lloyd took over the business and it continued until 1928 with no change to the name. The company was then acquired by Roger Yates.

Company names and addressesEdit

  • Lloyd and Valentine 1859 - 1860, Bilbie Street, Nottingham
  • Lloyd and Valentine 1861, 19 William Street, and 6 Sherwood Street, Nottingham
  • Lloyd and Dudgeon 1862 - 1876, 52A Union Road, Nottingham
  • Charles Lloyd & Co. 1876 - 1896, 52A Union Road, Nottingham
  • Charles Lloyd & Co. 1896 - 1928, 79 Brighton Street, St Ann’s, Nottingham

ApprenticesEdit

The first was Ernest Wragg of Carlton who, after his period of training, set up as an organ builder himself in 1894 on Carlton Road, Thorneywood, as E. Wragg & Son, Organ Builders.

The second was John Compton, born in Measham, Leicestershire. He entered into organ building first at Birmingham, then with Brindley of Sheffield, then in Nottingham under Charles Lloyd. When free of his apprenticeship in 1902, along with an organ builder named Musson of Woodborough Road, Nottingham, they became Compton & Musson.

Noted instrumentsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS". Nottingham Evening Post. 9 October 1908. p. 7. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  2. ^ F. T. Hodgkinson, Memories of Organs, Organ Builders and Organists of Nottingham.
  3. ^ "DEATHS". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 6 February 1874. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  4. ^ "NEW ORGAN". Leicestershire Mercury. 26 February 1859. p. 5. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ "NPOR C01266". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  6. ^ "MELTON MOWBRAY". Stamford Mercury. 9 September 1859. p. 4. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ "ST. GEORGE'S ORGAN". Leicestershire Mercury. 30 June 1860. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. ^ "RE-OPENING OF LOUGHBOROUGH CHURCH". Derby Mercury. 8 October 1862. p. 2. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. ^ "NPOR N13586". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  10. ^ "NEW CHURCHES IN NOTTINGHAM". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 16 September 1864. p. 5. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. ^ "THE NEW ORGAN FOR ALL SAINTS' CHURCH, NOTTINGHAM". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 7 July 1865. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  12. ^ "OPENING OF A NEW ORGAN AT HYSON GREEN CHURCH". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 22 December 1865. p. 11. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. ^ "NPOR D03238". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  14. ^ "NPOR D03824". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  15. ^ "NPOR N05325". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  16. ^ "RE-OPENING OF BROAD-STREET BAPTIST CHAPEL". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 20 August 1869. p. 5. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  17. ^ "OPENING OF THE NEW ORGAN". Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal. 2 December 1870. p. 3. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  18. ^ "Codnor Parish Church". Derbyshire Courier. England. 9 December 1876. Retrieved 17 June 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  19. ^ "FINDERN". Derby Mercury. 9 August 1876. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  20. ^ "NPOR N00491". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  21. ^ "OPENING OF A NEW CHURCH AT THORESBY PARK". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 24 November 1876. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  22. ^ "RESTORATION OF BURTON JOYCE CHURCH". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 30 May 1879. p. 3. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  23. ^ "NPOR D06278". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  24. ^ "NPOR N00007". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  25. ^ "NPOR N00476". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  26. ^ "OPENING OF THE NEW ORGAN AT ST. THOMAS'S CHURCH". Nottingham Evening Post. 2 November 1882. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  27. ^ "NPOR G01292". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  28. ^ "REOPENING OF A CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT RIDDINGS". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 30 March 1883. p. 5. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  29. ^ "NPOR D06402". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  30. ^ "NPOR D06269". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  31. ^ "HICKLING CHURCH ORGAN". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 12 November 1886. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  32. ^ "ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S, NOTTINGHAM". Nottingham Evening Post. 24 August 1887. p. 3. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  33. ^ "ST. BARNABAS - ORGAN OPENING". Derby Mercury. 24 April 1889. p. 2. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  34. ^ "NPOR N01810". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  35. ^ "NPOR N05345". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  36. ^ "NPOR N14367". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016. (The Faculty and the Diocesan magazine say the organ was supplied by White of Grantham.)
  37. ^ "ORGAN OPENING". Derby Daily Telegraph. 11 November 1892. p. 2. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  38. ^ "ORGAN OPENING AT SOMERCOTES CHURCH". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 13 January 1894. p. 2. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  39. ^ "NPOR N00115". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  40. ^ "NPOR N01886". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  41. ^ "NPOR G01287". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  42. ^ "NEW ORGAN AT WEST BRIDGFORD CHURCH". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 25 November 1899. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  43. ^ "NPOR N01157". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  44. ^ "NPOR K01007". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  45. ^ "NPOR K01006". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  46. ^ "NPOR N14488". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  47. ^ "NPOR G01089". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  48. ^ "NPOR R01038". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  49. ^ "NPOR N00361". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  50. ^ "NEW ORGAN AT KIRK HALLAM CHURCH". Sheffield Daily Telegraph. 9 May 1904. p. 4. Retrieved 31 January 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  51. ^ "NPOR N05321". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  52. ^ "NPOR N13617". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  53. ^ "NPOR D08514". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  54. ^ "NPOR N01798". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  55. ^ "NPOR N05357". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  56. ^ "NPOR D04705". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  57. ^ "NPOR N00210". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.
  58. ^ "NPOR R01564". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 31 January 2016.