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Charles Kaufman (October 20, 1904 – May 2, 1991) was an American novelist, writer and screenwriter.

Charles Kaufman
Born
Charles Kaufman

(1904-10-20)October 20, 1904
Paterson, New Jersey, United States
DiedMay 2, 1991(1991-05-02) (aged 86)
OccupationScreenwriter

Kaufman was a short story writer for The New Yorker.[1] His screenplay for the 1958 film The Story of Esther Costello was nominated for a BAFTA Award for Best British Screenplay. Along with Wolfgang Reinhart he was nominated for an Academy Award for Original Screenplay in 1962 for the film Freud.

In 2010, Let There Be Light, whose screenplay Kaufman wrote with John Huston, was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."[2][3]

Kaufman died of pneumonia in Los Angeles.[4]

Selected worksEdit

NovelsEdit

  • Fiesta in Manhattan (Morrow, 1939)[5]

ScreenplaysEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Charles A. Kaufman; Screenwriter Honored for Freud Biography," Los Angeles Times obituary May 9, 1991, page 32.
  2. ^ "'Empire Strikes Back' among 25 film registry picks". Retrieved December 28, 2010..
  3. ^ Barnes, Mike (December 28, 2010). "'Empire Strikes Back,' 'Airplane!' Among 25 Movies Named to National Film Registry". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 28, 2010..
  4. ^ "Charles A. Kaufman; Screenwriter Honored for Freud Biography," Los Angeles Times obituary May 9, 1991, page 32
  5. ^ "Books of the Times" by Charles Poore, New York Times, July 1, 1939

External linksEdit