Central-Alameda, Los Angeles

Central-Alameda is a 2.18 square miles (5.65 km2) square mile neighborhood within the South Los Angeles region of Los Angeles, California.[1]

Central-Alameda
Central-Alameda is located in Western Los Angeles
Central-Alameda
Central-Alameda
Location within Los Angeles
Coordinates: 34°03′19″N 118°22′11″W / 34.0553°N 118.3697°W / 34.0553; -118.3697Coordinates: 34°03′19″N 118°22′11″W / 34.0553°N 118.3697°W / 34.0553; -118.3697
Country United States
State California
County Los Angeles
City Los Angeles
Time zonePacific
Area code(s)323


Central-Alameda neighborhood map as drawn by the Los Angeles Times.

GeographyEdit

According to the Mapping L.A. project of the Los Angeles Times, Central-Alameda, which measure 2.18 square miles, is bounded on the north and northeast by Downtown L.A., on the east by the city of Vernon, on the south by Huntington Park and Florence-Firestone, and on the west by Historic South Central and South Park. The street boundaries are north, Washington Boulevard; south, Slauson Avenue; west, Central Avenue, and east, Alameda Street.[1][2][3] Central-Alameda encompasses the area of the neighborhood traditionally known as Nevin.

PopulationEdit

According to the U.S. census, the neighborhood's population in 2000 was 40,947, which amounted to 18,760 people per square mile, among the highest densities for the city of Los Angeles and among the highest densities for the county. In 2008 the L.A. Department of City Planning estimated the population at 43,638. The average household size was 4.3 people, considered high for both the city and the county. Renters occupied 70.2% of the housing units and owners inhabited the rest, 29.8%.[2]

There were 1,980 families headed by single parents, 26.3% of the total, considered high for both the city and the county. The median age was 22, "young for the city and young for the county." The percentages of residents aged 10 through 34 were among the county's highest. The percentages of never married men and women were among the county's highest. Just 444 people, 1.8% of the neighborhood population, were veterans, low for both the city and the county.[2]

The Los Angeles Times considered the neighborhood "not especially diverse," with Latinos measuring 84.6% of the population (high for the county), blacks 13.3% (also high for the county), whites 1% and Asians 0.7%.[2][4]

The median household income of $31,559 (in 2008 dollars) was low for both the city and the county.[2]

GovernmentEdit

As part of the city government, the neighborhood is represented by the Central-Alameda Neighborhood Council.[5]

Education and recreationEdit

In education, just 2.8% of the residents 25 and older had a four-year degree, considered low when compared to the city and the county as a whole. Seventy-five percent of residents in that age range had failed to complete high school, the highest percentage of any Los Angeles City neighborhood.[2][6]

 
Jefferson High School, 1920

Public schoolEdit

Jefferson High School is situated within Central-Alameda at 41st and Hooper streets.

RecreationEdit

City recreation facilities include:

  • Central Recreation Center, Naomi Avenue at East 22nd Street[7]
  • Ross Snyder Recreation Center, 41st Street[8]
  • Central Avenue Jazz Park, Central Avenue at 42nd Place[9]
  • Fred Roberts Park and Recreation Center, Long Beach Avenue between East 46th Street and East 48th Place[10]
  • Latham Park, Latham Street at East 53rd Street[11]
  • Slauson Recreation Center, 53rd Street at Compton Avenue[12]
  • Augustus F. Hawkins Natural Park, Slauson and Compton avenues[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "South L.A.," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Central-Alameda," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  3. ^ "Central L.A.," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  4. ^ [1] Diversity "measures the probability that any two residents, chosen at random, would be of different ethnicities. If all residents are of the same ethnic group it's zero. If half are from one group and half from another it's .50." —Los Angeles Times
  5. ^ [2] Neighborhood Council website
  6. ^ [3] "Less Than High School," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  7. ^ [4] Department of Recreation and Parks
  8. ^ [5] Department of Recreation and Parks
  9. ^ [6][permanent dead link] Central Avenue Jazz Park
  10. ^ [7] Department of Recreation and Parks
  11. ^ [8] Department of Recreation and Parks
  12. ^ [9] Department of Recreation and Parks
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-05-10. Retrieved 2013-05-01.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy

External linksEdit