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Centennial Hall is located on the campus of the University of Arizona, in Tucson, and was the campus auditorium, designed by campus architect Roy Place and using the signature red brick that is a part of almost all UA buildings. The auditorium opened in 1937 and presented musical programs, as well as stage plays, to the student community as well as to the general public. The auditorium was also used as a general lecture hall.[1]

Centennial Hall
University of Arizona May 2019 05 (Centennial Hall).jpg
Address1020 East University Boulevard
Tucson, Arizona
United States
Coordinates32°13′53″N 110°57′20″W / 32.23149°N 110.95543°W / 32.23149; -110.95543
OwnerUniversity of Arizona
OperatorUApresents
Capacity2,500[1]
Construction
OpenedApril 22, 1937
ArchitectRoy Place[1]
Website
uapresents.org/centennial-hall

From 1947-1984, the auditorium hosted the Tucson Sunday Evening Forum. Many prominent American figures appeared at the Forum, including Martin Luther King Jr, Eleanor Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Jackie Robinson, and Walter Kronkite.[2]

The facility was extensively renovated in 1985 at a cost of over $4 million, and was renamed to honor the University's 100th anniversary. The theatre is currently operated by UApresents, the University of Arizona's professional performing arts presenter. UApresents brings the world's finest theatre, dance, spoken word, classical, jazz and world music to Southern Arizona. Some University lectures are held in the venue as well.

In 2010, it was announced that the Broadway in Tucson series would be bringing the smash Broadway hit Wicked to Tucson. This was the first time a Broadway in Tucson show was held at Centennial Hall. The presentation of Wicked was co-sponsored by UApresents; subsequently this represented the first partnership between the two organizations.

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Raines, Elaine (June 4, 2009). "The UA Auditorium was the largest in the state". Arizona Daily Star.
  2. ^ Eubank, Johanna (February 10, 2011). "Tales from the Morgue: Eleanor Roosevelt always drew a crowd in Tucson". Arizona Daily Star.

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