Caskieben (/kæskˈbɛn/ kahs-KEE-ben; Scottish Gaelic: Gasach beinn "Wooded Hill")[1] Caskieben was a palisaded tower built by the Garviach family during the 12th-century Norman expansion into Scotland. It stood on a low, circular mound surrounded by a 2 metre deep, 15 metre wide moat.

Caskieben
Part of Keith Hall
Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Keith Hall 1909.jpg
Colorized photograph of Keith Hall (Caskieben) near Inverurie, Scotland. Postcard dated June 30th, 1909.
Coordinates57°16′55″N 2°21′12″W / 57.28203425°N 2.35334179°W / 57.28203425; -2.35334179Coordinates: 57°16′55″N 2°21′12″W / 57.28203425°N 2.35334179°W / 57.28203425; -2.35334179
Grid referencegrid reference NJ 7879 2135
Typefortalice
Site information
OwnerLord Keith
Controlled byLord Keith
Conditionrenovated
Site history
Built1224
Built byGarvioch
MaterialsStone
Demolished1662
Battles/warsBattle of Inverurie (1308)

This earlier wooden tower was superseded nearby by a 13th-century stone castle also named Caskieben at first, but later renamed Keith Hall.

Nothing now remains of a structure, but the mound and moat are still visible.[2]

HistoryEdit

About 1224 Norman de Leslie received the lands of Caskieben and was doubtless the builder of the Anglo-Norman castle which superseded the old tower (NJ72SE 40). The castle of Caskieben that was enlarged after 1662 by the addition of a Renaissance mansion in front, and renamed Keith Hall, was, however, a fine example of the Z-plan castle, a style which probably originated in the district.

Mither Tap has an astronomical alignment with Caskieben, the hill being due west. Dr. Arthur Johnston said[3] "the hill of Benochie, a conical elevation about eight miles distant, casts its shadow over Caskieben at the periods of the equinox."


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