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Commemorative plaque to Mr. Carlos Sampaio Garrido, Portugal ambassador and Mr. Teixeira Branquinho chargé d'affaires in mission to Budapest in 1944 who managed to rescue some thousands of Hungarian Jews from the Holocaust. (Budapest, District XIII, Újpesti Quay Nr 5).
The Raoul Wallenberg-memorial at the Dohány Street Synagogue in Budapest

Alberto Carlos de Liz-Texeira Branquinho (27 January 1902 in Viseu, Portugal– † 1973) was a Portuguese diplomat credited with saving the lives of 1,000 Jews in Nazi-occupied Hungary during the Holocaust from Hungarian Fascists and the Nazis during the later stages of World War II. While serving as Portugal’s Chargé d'Affaires in Budapest in 1944.

Along with Sampaio Garrido, he rented houses and apartments to shelter and protect refugees from deportation and murder. They obtained permission from the Portuguese government to issue safe conducts to all persons who had relatives in Portugal, Brazil, or the Portuguese colonies or had the most remote connection to Portugal. Garrido and Branquinho also established an office of the Portuguese Red Cross at the Portuguese legation to care for Jewish refugees. This was largely done in cooperation with the Portuguese Foreign Office and under Salazar’s direct supervision with the provision that these refugees would not try to get Portuguese citizenship.[1]

On 23 April 1944 and following the German occupation of Hungary, the Portuguese ruler António de Oliveira Salazar decided to order his ambassador to return to Lisbon and leave Teixeira Branquinho as the chargé d'affaires, in his place. Garrido's recall was done in response to a request from Britain and the United States who wanted neutral countries to downgrade their diplomatic presence in Hungary.[2] In direct contact with Salazar Branquinho issued protective Passports to hundreds of Jewish families. Altogether about 1,000 lives were saved due to his actions. Branquinho was recalled to Lisbon on 30 October 1944.[3]

After the war Branquinho continued to serve his country as a diplomat, in Washington, Jakarta, Paris, Caracas, Baghdad, Teheran and the Hague, where he acted with Ambassador’s credentials. He retired in 1966.

His name has been included in The Raoul Wallenberg-memorial at the Dohány Street Synagogue in Budapest

Other Portuguese diplomats that saved people during the warEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pimentel, p 343-350
  2. ^ Milgram p. 264
  3. ^ Pimentel, p 343-350

SourcesEdit

  • "Spared Lives: The Actions of Three Portuguese Diplomats in World War Documentary Exhibition, Catalogue". Portuguese Diplomatic Institute / Historical and Diplomatic Archive. Retrieved August 4, 2014.
  • "Spared Lives: The Actions of Three Portuguese Diplomats in World War Documentary Exhibition, Catalogue" (PDF). Raoul Wallenberg Foundation/. Retrieved August 4, 2014.
  • Milgram, Avraham (2011). Portugal, Salazar, and the Jews. Yad Vashem. p. 324. ISBN 9789653083875.
  • Pimentel, Irene (2006). Judeus em Portugal Durante a II Guerra Mundial (in Portuguese). Lisbon: A Esfera do Livros. ISBN 9789896261054.