Cabinet of Ana Brnabić

The incumbent Government of Serbia, led by prime minister Ana Brnabić, was elected on 29 June 2017 by a majority vote in the National Assembly. It succeeded the second cabinet of Aleksandar Vučić, formed after the 2016 parliamentary election, after Vučić resigned the prime minister post following his election as the President of Serbia. Vučić appointed Ana Brnabić, previously the Minister of Public Administration, as his successor on 15 June 2017.[1][2]

Cabinet of Ana Brnabić
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15th Cabinet of Republic of Serbia
2017–present
Vlada Srbije logo.png
Date formed29 June 2017
People and organisations
Head of stateAleksandar Vučić
Head of governmentAna Brnabić
Member partiesSNS,
SPS,
SDPS,
PS,
PUPS,
SNP
History
Election(s)24 April 2016
PredecessorSecond cabinet of Aleksandar Vučić
SuccessorIncumbent

HistoryEdit

The cabinet comprises ministers from the Serbian Progressive Party (SNS), Socialist Party of Serbia (SPS), Social Democratic Party of Serbia (SDPS), Movement of Socialists (PS), Party of United Pensioners of Serbia (PUPS), and Serbian National Party (SNP), as well as some without a party affiliation. It consists mostly of the same ministers from the previous cabinet, with three new members introduced: Branko Ružić (SPS) taking the Brnabić's previous ministry, Goran Trivan (SPS) taking the new post of Minister of Environmental Protection, and Nenad Popović (SNP) a minister without portfolio in charge of innovations. Aleksandar Vulin, formerly the Minister of Labour, and Zoran Đorđević, formerly the Minister of Defence, swapped places. Jadranka Joksimović, formerly a minister without portfolio, assumed the new Ministry of European Integration. The cabinet was approved by 157 votes for and 57 against, out of 250 members of the National Assembly.[3]

On 7 May 2018, Minister of Finance Dušan Vujović resigned from the position due to personal reasons.[4] On 28 May 2018, Siniša Mali, at the time Mayor of Belgrade, was appointed as the new Minister of Finance.[5]

Cabinet membersEdit

Nominating party:   SNS ‹See Tfd›   SPS ‹See Tfd›   n-p (SNS-nominated) ‹See Tfd›   SDPS (SNS-nominated) ‹See Tfd›   PS (SNS-nominated) ‹See Tfd›   SNP (SNS-nominated) ‹See Tfd›   PUPS (SNS-nominated) ‹See Tfd›

Portfolio Minister Took office
Prime Minister
General Affairs Ana Brnabić 29 June 2017
Deputy Prime Ministers
Foreign Affairs Ivica Dačić 27 April 2014
Construction, Transportation and Infrastructure Zorana Mihajlović 27 April 2014
Internal Affairs Nebojša Stefanović 27 April 2014
Trade, Tourism and Telecommunications Rasim Ljajić 27 July 2012
Ministers
Agriculture, Forestry and Water Economy Branislav Nedimović 11 August 2016
Culture and Information Vladan Vukosavljević 11 August 2016
Defence Aleksandar Vulin 29 June 2017
Economy Goran Knežević 11 August 2016
Education, Science and Technological Development Mladen Šarčević 11 August 2016
Environmental Protection Goran Trivan 29 June 2017
European Integration Jadranka Joksimović 29 June 2017
Finance Siniša Mali 29 May 2018
Health Zlatibor Lončar 27 April 2014
Justice Nela Kuburović 11 August 2016
Labour, Employment, Veteran and Social Policy Zoran Đorđević 29 June 2017
Mining and Energy Aleksandar Antić 27 April 2014
Public Administration and Local Self-Government Branko Ružić 29 June 2017
Youth and Sports Vanja Udovičić 2 September 2013
Ministers without portfolio
Innovations and Technological Development Nenad Popović 29 June 2017
Regional Development Milan Krkobabić 11 August 2016
Violence Prevention and Protection of Children and the Disabled Slavica Đukić Dejanović 11 August 2016

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Serbia gets its first female – and gay – prime minister". The Guardian. 15 June 2017.
  2. ^ "Serbia's president formally nominates country's first openly gay prime minister". The Daily Telegraph. 15 June 2017.
  3. ^ "SRBIJA DOBILA NOVU VLADU Premijerka Ana Brnabić i ministri položili zakletvu" [Serbia gets a new government: Prime minister Ana Brnabić and the ministers took the oath]. Blic. 29 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Vujović podneo ostavku". b92.net (in Serbian). Tanjug. 7 May 2018. Retrieved 7 May 2018.
  5. ^ Antonijević, M. (28 May 2018). "Mali od danas više neće biti gradonačelnik, evo ko će VODITI BEOGRAD do izbora novog". blic.rs (in Serbian). Retrieved 28 May 2018.