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Bronx County District Attorney

The Bronx County District Attorney is the elected district attorney for Bronx County, which is coterminous with the Borough of the Bronx, in New York City. The office is responsible for the prosecution of violations of New York state laws. (Federal law in the Bronx is prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York). The current Bronx County District Attorney is Darcel Clark.

District Attorney of Bronx County
Incumbent
Darcel Clark

since January 1, 2016
Type District Attorney
Member of District Attorneys Association of the State of New York[1]
Term length Four years
Formation January 1, 1914
First holder Francis W. Martin
Website http://bronxda.nyc.gov

Contents

HistoryEdit

In a legislative act of February 12, 1796, New York State was divided into seven districts, each with an Assistant Attorney General, except for New York County, where Attorney General Josiah Ogden Hoffman prosecuted personally until 1801.[2]

The First District included Kings, Queens, Richmond, Suffolk, and Westchester counties. At that time, Westchester also included present-day Bronx County, and Queens County included much of present-day Nassau County. The Assistant Attorney General was renamed District Attorney and New York County was added to the First District on April 4, 1801. Westchester was separated from the First District and became part of the Eleventh District with Rockland and Putnam counties on April 12, 1813, and New York County became the Twelfth District on March 24, 1815. By 1818, New York State had 13 districts, which were divided so that each of the 50 county then in existence became its own district on April 21, 1818.[3][4][5][6]

Until 1822, the district attorney was appointed by the Council of Appointment, and held the office "during the Council's pleasure", meaning that there was no defined term of office. Under the provisions of the New York State Constitution of 1821, district attorneys were appointed to three-year terms by their County Court, and under the provisions of the Constitution of 1846, the office became elective by popular ballot for a three-year term beginning January 1 and ending December 31.[2] Vacancies were filled by the Governor of New York until a successor was elected to a full term at the next annual election, and acting district attorneys were appointed by Courts of General Sessions pending the governor's action.

In 1874, New York City annexed the West Bronx into New York County. New York County was further expanded in 1895 to include all of today's New York and Bronx Counties.[7] The Consolidation Charter of 1896 extended the term of incumbent district attorney John R. Fellows, who had been elected in 1893 to a three-year term from January 1, 1894 to December 31, 1896, by an extra year. Since the city elections of 1897, the New York and Bronx County District Attorneys' terms have coincided with the Mayor's terms and have been four years, except for 1901 to 1905, when two mayors served two-year terms. In case of a vacancy, a special election is held for the remainder of the term.

For the list of district attorneys for the area covering Bronx County prior to its creation from New York County, see Werner (p. 553, 554, and 563) for 1801 to 1874, both Werner (p. 563) and New York County District Attorney from 1874 to 1895, and New York County District Attorney for 1895 to 1913. When Bronx County was created on January 1, 1914, Francis W. Martin, who won the election in November 1913 in anticipation of its formation, became district attorney.[8] His initial salary was $10,000.[9]

List of Bronx County District AttorneysEdit

District Attorney Dates in office Party Notes
Francis W. Martin[10] January 1, 1914 – December 31, 1920 Democratic
Edward J. Glennon January 1, 1921 – December 31, 1921 (interim)
January 1, 1922 – December 31, 1923 (elected)
Democratic
  • appointed by Governor Al Smith[14]
  • elected to a four-year term[15]
  • resigned to become a New York State Supreme Court justice[16]
John E. McGeehan January 1, 1924 – December 31, 1925 (interim)
January 1, 1926 – December 24, 1929 (elected)
Democratic
  • appointed by Governor Al Smith[16]
  • elected to the remainder of Glennon's term[17]
  • elected to a four-year term[18][19]
  • resigned to become a New York State Supreme Court justice[20][21]
Charles B. McLaughlin December 24, 1929[21] – March 17, 1933 Democratic
  • elected to a four-year term[20][22]
  • resigned to become a New York State Supreme Court justice[23][24]
Samuel J. Foley March 22, 1933 – December 31, 1933 (interim)
January 1, 1934 – December 29, 1949 (elected)
Democratic
  • appointed by Governor Herbert Lehman[25][26]
  • ran on the Democratic and Recovery Party lines in his first election,[27] but had been a Democrat
  • elected to four four-year terms[28][29][30][31]
  • ran for a Bronx County Court judgeship in November 1949, and won[32]
George B. DeLuca January 1, 1950 – December 31, 1954 Democratic
  • elected to two four-year terms[33][34]
  • resigned upon taking office as Lieutenant Governor of New York[35]
Daniel V. Sullivan[36] January 1, 1955 – December 31, 1955 (interim)
January 1, 1956 – December 31, 1959 (elected)
Democratic
  • appointed by Governor Averell Harriman when DeLuca became his Lieutenant Governor[35][37]
  • elected to a four-year term[38]
  • retired, did not seek renomination[39]
Isidore Dollinger January 1, 1960 – September 18, 1968 Democratic
  • elected to three four-year terms[39][40][41]
  • resigned to accept a nomination to run for a New York State Supreme Court judge position[42]
Burton B. Roberts September 18, 1968 – November 7, 1968 (acting)
November 7, 1968 – December 31, 1968 (interim)
January 1, 1969 – September 16, 1972 (elected)
September 16, 1972 – December 31, 1972 (interim)
Democratic, Republican, Liberal
  • became acting district attorney upon Dollinger's resignation[42]
  • appointed by Governor Nelson Rockefeller[43]
  • nominated by three Bronx County parties' committees for his initial election,[42] but had been a Democrat[43]
  • elected to the remainder of Dollinger's term[44]
  • elected to a four-year term[45]
  • resigned to accept a nomination to run for a New York State Supreme Court judge position but was re-appointed by Rockefeller for continuity of investigations until he was succeeded[46][47]
Mario Merola[48] January 1, 1973 – October 27, 1987 Democratic, Republican, Liberal, Conservative
  • nominated by four Bronx County parties' committees for his initial election to the remainder of Roberts' term,[46][49] but had been a Democrat[47]
  • elected to the remainder of Roberts' term[49]
  • elected to four four-year terms[50][51][52] including one after he died shortly before election day[53]
  • died in office[48]

Paul T. Gentile

October 27, 1987 – December 10, 1987 (acting)
December 10, 1987 – December 31, 1988 (interim)
Democratic
  • became acting district attorney after Merola's unexpected death[48]
  • appointed by Governor Mario Cuomo to a one-year term[54]
  • withdrew from the primary election race[55]
Robert T. Johnson January 1, 1989 – December 31, 2015 Democratic, Liberal, Conservative
  • won his initial election for the remainder of Merola's term running on three party lines and unopposed, but had been a Democrat[56][57]
  • elected to six four-year terms
  • resigned to accept a nomination to run for a New York State Supreme Court judge position[58]
Darcel D. Clark January 1, 2016 – current Democratic
  • nominated by the Bronx Democratic County Committee to replace Johnson on the primary ballot[59] and elected to a four-year term[60]

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Membership". daasny.com. Retrieved 1 October 2017.
  2. ^ a b Chester, Alden; Weeks, Lyman Horace; Dougherty, John Hampden (1911). Legal and Judicial History of New York. National Americana Society.
  3. ^ Werner, Edgar A. (1891). Civil List and Constitutional History of the Colony and State of New York. Albany, N.Y.: Weed, Parsons, and Company. pp. 553–563. Retrieved 22 October 2016.
  4. ^ Chester, Alden (1911). Legal and Judicial History of New York, Volume 3. New York, N.Y.: National Americana Society. p. 85. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  5. ^ The New York Civil List compiled by Franklin Benjamin Hough (pp. 366ff and 379; Weed, Parsons and Co., 1858).
  6. ^ Civil List and Forms of Government of the Colony and State of New York: Containing Notes on the Various Governmental Organizations; List of the Principal Colonial, State and County Officers, and the Congressional Delegations and Presidential Electors, with the Votes of the Electoral Colleges and the Whole, Arranged in Constitutional Periods. Albany, N.Y.: Weed, Parsons and Company. 1867. pp. 202–203, 361, and 532. Retrieved 14 December 2016.
  7. ^ Geoffrey Hermalyn and Lloyd Ultan, "Bronx" in The Encyclopedia of New York City (1st edition), edited by Kenneth T. Jackson, New York Historical Society and Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut, 1995, ISBN 0-300-05536-6, page 140.
  8. ^ "Bronx Officials Appoint — Nearly Every Place Getter on City or State Payroll Now". New York Times. December 31, 1913. p. 2. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  9. ^ "The City Record — Official Journal of the City of New York". XLII (IX). September 1914: 7431. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  10. ^ "F.W. Martin, Jurist, Dies at 68 — Presiding Justice of Appellate Division Since 1935, Member of State Court 26 Years — Named to Unit by Smith — District Attorney in the Bronx from 1913 to 1920, Making High Record of Convictions". New York Times. June 2, 1947. p. 25. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  11. ^ "Not One Seat In Board Of Estimate Saved to Tammany — Fusion Alderman Also — McAneny and Prendergast In Safely with Other Fusion Borough Heads — Close in New York County — With Just a Possibility at Midnight That Murphy May Save It — Neck and Neck in Bronx — Matthewson, (Rep.,) May Have Beaten Tammany and Third Ticket Up There — Queens Easy for Connolly — Brooklyn Gave Fusion 54,808 Plurality — Republicans Carry County — Prendergast's Vote Cut". New York Times. November 5, 1913. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  12. ^ "Bronx County Officers — Democrats Elect County Judge, Surrogate, and District Attorney". New York Times. November 5, 1913. p. 2. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  13. ^ "Officials Elected". New York Times. November 7, 1917. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  14. ^ a b "Names Talley Judge Of General Sessions — Governor Smith Also Appoints Edward J. Glennon Bronx District Attorney — G.W. Martin County Judge — All the Appointees Allied With Tammany Hall — Talley's Selection Not Expected". New York Times. December 29, 1920. p. 16. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  15. ^ "The City Vote — Hylan's Plurality 417,986 — Craig's 249,252 — Banton's 83,680". New York Times. November 10, 1921. p. 4. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  16. ^ a b "Smith Names Crain for the Supreme Court; Olvany Succeeds Him in General Sessions". New York Times. January 2, 1924. p. 1. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  17. ^ "Davis, Smith, Dawes and Roosevelt Open Intensive Drive Here — Tammany Zealously Aids Fight as Democrats Predict Victory in State and Nation — Davis Makes 3 Speeches — 5,000 Turn Out at Staten Island, Where He Demands Honest Government — Big Crowd Greets Teddy — He Also Forecasts His Election Over Governor — Dawes Heard in Brooklyn". New York TimesM. October 26, 1924. p. 1. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  18. ^ "Mayoralty Sweep — Tammany Controls Board of Estimate and Aldermen — Entire City Ticket Wins — Wigwam Elects Five Boro Heads and Judicial Candidates — Olvany's First Triumph — Result Clinches His Leadership and Is a Tribute Also to Gov. Smith — Voting Machines Are Used — Test of Them in Fifteenth District Yields Quick Count — Leads to Some Complaints". New York Times. November 4, 1925. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  19. ^ "Supreme Court Justices, District Attorneys, City Court Justice, Kings Surrogate". New York Times. November 4, 1925. p. 3. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  20. ^ a b "Big Vote Piled Up — Berry and McKee Are Victors by Large Pluralities — Sweep in Four Boroughs — Tammany Elects County Officers Throughout City, Except in Queens — Beaten There by Harvey — Democratic Judges All Winners — Dodd Has an Easy Lead Over Callaghan — All Amendments Carried — Feature of the Election Is the Big Vote Polled by Thomas and Socialists". New York Times. November 6, 1929. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  21. ^ a b "McGeehan Is Sworn In — Retiring Bronx Prosecutor Takes Oath as Supreme Court Justice". New York Times. December 25, 1929. p. 20. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  22. ^ "Farley Made Sheriff Before His 122 Aides — McLaughlin Goes in as Bronx Prosecutor, Pledging War on Crime — No Changes by Moran". New York Times. January 2, 1930. p. 11. Retrieved 17 May 2016.
  23. ^ "McLaughlin Takes Bench Today". New York Times. March 16, 1933. p. 17. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  24. ^ "McLaughlin Takes Oath — Joins Bronx Supreme Court as Hundreds Crowd Court Room". New York Times. March 17, 1933. p. 17. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  25. ^ "S.J. Foley Named Bronx Prosecutor — Assistant District Attorney Selected to Fill Post Left by McLaughlin — Pledges War On Rackets — Official Who Helped End Building Troubles in 1929 Promises New Fight on Crime". New York Times. March 22, 1933. p. 15. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  26. ^ "Foley Inducted in Bronx". New York Times. March 23, 1933. p. 17. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  27. ^ "List of Candidates Who Will Be on Ballots in Municipal Election Nov. 7". New York Times. November 5, 1933. p. 2N. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  28. ^ "Officials Elected". New York Times. November 8, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  29. ^ "Complete Tables of Vote for City-Wide Officials and Borough and County Posts". New York Times. November 4, 1937. p. 14. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  30. ^ Hagerty, James A. (November 6, 1941). "Old Party Lines Fading as Result of City Election — Moves to Depose Sullivan as Tammany Head and Split in Democratic Ranks Seen — Republican Gains Likely — Dewey's Chances for Election as Governor Rises — Labor Polled 434,297 Votes". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  31. ^ Hagerty, James A. (November 7, 1945). "Record Plurality — Margin Totals 685,175 — McGoldrick Out but Runs Ahead of Ticket — Blow to Dewey Seen — Beldock Defeated by Big Margin — Lynch Loses to Hall in Richmond". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  32. ^ "Rogers In City Job With Mayor's Help — Former Tammany Leader and Ex-Borough President Gets $10,000-a-Year Post". New York Times. December 31, 1949. p. 1. Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  33. ^ Stuart, John (November 9, 1949). "Democrats Sweep Judicial Offices — Froessel Holds Strong Lead Over Bromley — Party Takes County Prosecutors' Posts". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  34. ^ "Democrats Chosen for Supreme Court — McGivern and Markowitz Are Victors in First District and McDonald Leads in Second". New York Times. November 4, 1953. p. 22. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  35. ^ a b "Sullivan Bronx Prosecutor". New York Times. January 1, 1955. p. 6. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  36. ^ "Daniel Sullivan, Prosecutor, Dies — Ex-Bronx District Attorney and City Court Justice, 79". New York Times. January 9, 1966. p. 56. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  37. ^ Amper, Richard (January 2, 1955). "2 Hitches Mark Swearing-In Rite — Javits Raises His Left Hand and Abrams, Rent Official, Misses Main Ceremony". New York Times. p. 58. Retrieved 19 May 2016.
  38. ^ Egan, Leo (November 9, 1955). "Democrats in City Sweep; Highways and Dam Beaten; Jersey G.O.P. Margin is Cut — O'Connor Winner — Takes Queens Contest — Republicans Retain Suburban Power". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  39. ^ a b Hailey, Foster (November 4, 1959). "Dollinger Victor in Bronx Contest — Democrat Gets Big Vote for Prosecutor — Braisted Wins in Richmond". New York Times. p. 19. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  40. ^ Hunt, Richard P. (November 6, 1963). "Vote Light Here — Cariello, O'Connor and Dollinger Elected — Amendments Pass". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  41. ^ Ronan, Thomas P. (November 8, 1967). "Re-Election Won by 3 Prosecutors — Dollinger, Mackell, Braisted Score Easy Victories". New York Times. p. 31. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  42. ^ a b c Ronan, Thomas P. (September 19, 1968). "Roberts Nominated for Bronx District Attorney — Three Parties Endorse Him to Succeed Dollinger — His Chief Resigns to Run for State Supreme Court". New York Times. p. 35. Retrieved 14 May 2016.
  43. ^ a b "Bronx Prosecutor Appointed". New York Times. Associated Press. November 8, 1968. p. 52. Retrieved 14 May 2016.
  44. ^ King, Seth S. (November 6, 1968). "Democrats Win Special Elections For Council, District Attorney". New York Times. p. 29. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  45. ^ "Midonick Is Elected Surrogate In Manhattan, Beating Aarons". New York Times. November 3, 1971. p. 1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  46. ^ a b Van Gelder, Lawrence (September 28, 1972). "Merola Is Designated to Seek Post as Bronx District Attorney". New York Times. p. 51. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  47. ^ a b Andelman, David A. (January 2, 1973). "New Prosecutor in Bronx to Seek A 'Cooperative Effort' With Nadjari". New York Times. p. 31. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  48. ^ a b c Barron, James (October 28, 1987). "Mario Merola, 65, Prosecutor in the Bronx for 15 Years, Dies". New York Times. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  49. ^ a b Shipler, David K. (November 8, 1972). "Democrats Lead in Races For 28 Judgeships Here". New York Times. p. 32. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  50. ^ "Results of Voting in the City and Suburbs". New York Times. November 6, 1975. p. 33. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  51. ^ Lynn, Frank (November 5, 1979). "Transit Bond Key Issue in New York — Jersey to Pick New Assembly". New York Times. p. A1. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  52. ^ "Vote Totals For the Elections in the New York and Jersey". New York Times. November 10, 1983. Retrieved 19 December 2016.
  53. ^ Lynn, Frank (November 4, 1987). "Democrats Capture Top Posts In Suffolk, Erie and Monroe — Sweep All 44 Races in New York City, But Lose in Nassau". New York Times. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  54. ^ Howe Verhovek, Sam (December 11, 1987). "Man in the News — New District Attorney for the Bronx: Paul Thomas Gentile". New York Times. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  55. ^ Lynn, Frank (June 24, 1988). "Interim District Attorney Drops Out of Bronx Race". New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved 7 June 2018.
  56. ^ Howe Verhovek, Sam (September 16, 1988). "Ex-Judge Wins in the Bronx in Vote for District Attorney". New York Times. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  57. ^ "Metropolitan Area Contests". New York Times. November 7, 1988. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  58. ^ Mueller, Benjamin (September 19, 2015). "Robert Johnson, Bronx District Attorney, Says He Wants to Become a State Judge". New York Times. p. A15. Retrieved 15 May 2016.
  59. ^ Pastor, Kate (October 1, 2015). "Bronx District Attorney Candidate Defends Her Nomination by Democratic Leaders". New York Times. p. A24. Retrieved 2016-01-11.
  60. ^ Burns, Alexander (November 4, 2015). "Michael McMahon, Ex-Congressman, Is Elected Staten Island District Attorney". New York Times. p. A26. Retrieved 27 November 2016.