Bourbon King

Bourbon King (foaled 1900) was an American Saddlebred stallion. He was known for being the founding sire of the popular Chief family of Saddlebreds.

Bourbon King
BreedAmerican Saddlebred
DisciplineFive-gaited
SireBourbon Chief
GrandsireHarrison Chief
DamAnnie C
SexStallion
Foaled1900 (1900)
ColorChestnut
BreederAllie G. Jones
OwnerAllie G. Jones
Major wins
Grand Championship in 1903

LifeEdit

Bourbon King was foaled in 1900. He was a chestnut stallion with a star and white coronets on his hind feet. He was sired by Bourbon Chief and out of Annie C.[1] Bourbon King was bred and owned by Allie G. Jones, who had a farm near North Middletown, Kentucky.[2][3] Jones was elected president of the American Saddle Horse Breeders' Association, the forerunner to the American Saddlebred Horse Association, in 1936.[3] Bourbon King lived to be 30 years old.[4]

CareerEdit

Bourbon King was a five-gaited horse.[5] He won the Grand Championship at the Louisville Horse Show at age three.[6]

OffspringEdit

Bourbon King was the progenitor of the Chief family, one of the most influential bloodlines in Saddlebreds.[5] His son Edna May's King was the first horse to repeat win the Grand Championship at the Kentucky State Fair. One of Bourbon King's descendants, Wing Commander, was the first five-gaited horse to win six consecutive World Grand Championships.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Bourbon King Saddlebred Legend - Bourbon King as progenitor of the Chief family". Archived from the original on 24 February 2016. Retrieved 17 April 2016.
  2. ^ Scott, Berkeley; Scott, Jeanine (June 2001). Bourbon County. ISBN 9780738506852. Retrieved 17 April 2016.
  3. ^ a b Chas. l. Cook, Jr (4 March 2015). Historical Memories of American Saddlebred Visionaries. ISBN 9781935538097. Retrieved 17 April 2016.
  4. ^ "The Golden Cross Gets Top Vote
    ...The Bourbon King Influence Found Throughout : The Saddle Horse Report"
    . Retrieved 17 April 2016.
  5. ^ a b "History of the American Saddlebred Horse". Archived from the original on 9 April 2016. Retrieved 17 April 2016.
  6. ^ Lynghaug, Fran (15 October 2009). The Official Horse Breeds Standards Guide. ISBN 9781616731717. Retrieved 17 April 2016.