Boston Courier

The Boston Courier was an American newspaper based in Boston, Massachusetts. It was founded on March 2, 1824, by Joseph T. Buckingham[1] as a daily newspaper which supported protectionism.[1] Buckingham served as editor until he sold out completely in 1848,[1] after suffering a severe financial crisis in 1837 and losing much of his editorial authority.[2] The Boston Courier supported the National Republicans, and later the Whig Party.[3] In the period before the American Civil War, its editors, including George S. Hillard and George Lunt,[4] supported the states' right position on the abolition of slavery. From 1867 to 1915 the Boston Courier (New Series) was a weekly newspaper published by Libbey & Dennison.[5]

The Boston Courier
TypeDaily newspaper from 1824 to 1866; Weekly newspaper from 1867 to 1915
FoundedMarch 2, 1824
LanguageEnglish
Ceased publicationApril 10, 1915
HeadquartersBoston, Massachusetts

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Evert Augustus Duyckinck; George Long Duyckinck, eds. (1856). "Joseph T. Buckingham". Cyclopaedia of American literature. Vol. 2. C. Scribner. pp. 19–20.
  2. ^ Howard B. Rock; Paul A. Gilje; Robert Asher, eds. (1995). ""Becoming Joseph T. Buckingham" by Gary J. Kornblith". American artisans: crafting social identity, 1750-1850. JHU Press. p. 133. ISBN 0-8018-5029-0.
  3. ^ Howard B. Rock; Paul A. Gilje; Robert Asher, eds. (1995). ""Spavined Ministers, Lying Toothpullers, and Buggering Priests": Third-Partyism and the Search for Security in the Antebellum North by Bruce Laurie". American artisans: crafting social identity, 1750-1850. JHU Press. pp. 98–122. ISBN 0-8018-5029-0; (See p. 102.){{cite book}}: CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  4. ^ Lunt, George (1858). Radicalism in religion, philosophy and social life: four papers from the Boston Courier for 1858. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co.
  5. ^ "Boston Courier". Library of Congress Online Catalog.

See alsoEdit