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Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park

Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park is located in the eastern part of Prospect Park in Brooklyn, New York City. It is situated on the northeast shore of the Lullwater, a waterway north of Prospect Park's Lake and southeast of the Ravine.

Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park
Prospect Park Boathouse.jpg
Western side
Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park is located in New York City
Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park
Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park is located in New York
Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park
Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park is located in the United States
Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park
LocationNew York, New York
Coordinates40°39′39″N 73°57′55″W / 40.66083°N 73.96528°W / 40.66083; -73.96528Coordinates: 40°39′39″N 73°57′55″W / 40.66083°N 73.96528°W / 40.66083; -73.96528
Built1904
ArchitectHelmle & Huberty
NRHP reference #72000850
Significant dates
Added to NRHPJanuary 7, 1972[1]
Designated NYCLOctober 14, 1965

HistoryEdit

Map of notable buildings and structures at Prospect Park (note: not all entrances shown). Click on points for more details.

The Boathouse on the Lullwater was built in 1905-07 to a classical design of Helmle, Hudswell and Huberty, protégés of McKim, Mead and White.[2] It supplanted an older wooden boathouse further north. The classical design contains an arcade facing the Lullwater, with a canopy supported by columns of the Tuscan order. The entablature at the top of the columns contains triglyphs, and a balustrade runs atop the canopy, surrounding it and forming a second-floor terrace. The interior of the Boathouse had double staircases that ascended to a second floor, merging at a landing in the middle. There was a boat-renting office at ground level, between the staircases. The second floor was composed of a dining room with doors opening outward onto the terrace. The terrace received a shed in 1915.[3]

By the 1960s, the structure was underutilized. The boat concession only operated on weekends and the Boathouse was visited by fewer than ten people an hour, even on the busiest summer weekends.[3][4] At one point in September 1964, the Parks Department was within forty-eight hours of demolishing the Boathouse.[3][5]

The Boathouse shared many features with McKim, Mead and White's original Pennsylvania Station, whose 1960s demolition had been controversial. The resulting historic preservation movement generated public pressure to save the Boathouse. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.[1][6]

Though the Boathouse was saved, restorations were deferred for several years.[7] The interior renovations began in 1971, under Commissioner August Heckscher. The Boathouse reopened to the public in 1974, but the exterior terracotta was not renovated until 1979.[8] Further restorations were required in the 1980s under Commissioner Gordon Davis to repair damage from a leaking roof. After twenty years as a visitors center and park ranger headquarters, the Boathouse was restored for a third time in the late 1990s because of deterioration in the terracotta.[8] It now houses the Audubon Center, the Audubon Society's only urban interpretive center in the United States.

In popular cultureEdit

The Boathouse was seen in the movie The Age Of Innocence (1993). It was also seen in the final scene of Going In Style (2017)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15.
  2. ^ City of New York, Department of Parks (1906). The City of New York, Department of Parks Report for the year 1905. New York: City of New York. pp. 122–123.
  3. ^ a b c Lancaster, Clay (1972). Prospect Park Handbook (2nd ed.). New York: Long Island University Press. pp. 51–52, 66. ISBN 0-913252-06-9. Archived from the original on 2009-08-27. Retrieved 2009-09-04.
  4. ^ Tolchin, Martin (September 14, 1964). "A GASLIGHT RELIC AWAITS VERDICT; Prospect Park Boathouse May Face Demolition". The New York Times. New York Times Company. pp. food fashions family furnishings, Page 29. Retrieved 11 September 2007.
  5. ^ "Audubon Center — History". Prospect Park Alliance. 2008. Archived from the original on 21 March 2009. Retrieved 21 March 2009.
  6. ^ Stephen S. Lash (April 5, 1971). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Boathouse on the Lullwater of the Lake in Prospect Park". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2008-08-16. (includes one map) See also: "Accompanying one photo, undated".
  7. ^ "On Again, Off Again, Plans to Restore Prospect Park On Again". The New York Times. New York Times Company. September 8, 1967. pp. Page 41. Retrieved 11 September 2007.
  8. ^ a b Gray, Christopher (1996-06-30). "Streetscapes/Prospect Park Boathouse;After a 1971 Restoration Fails, It's Time to Re-Restore". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-02-07.

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