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Roman Catholic Diocese of Montefiascone

  (Redirected from Bishop of Corneto e Montefiascone)

HistoryEdit

The town of Montefiascone, or, more specifically, the Rocca di Montefiascone, had long been[4] the official residence of the Rector of the Patrimony of Saint Peter, and, whenever a pope visited, of the pope as well[5].

Pope Urban V had stayed at Montefiascone during his journey from Avignon to Rome, and was greatly impressed by the loyalty and affection of the inhabitants toward himself and his predecessors. The Pope held a consistory for the creation of new cardinals at Montefiascone on 22 September 1368. He named six Frenchmen, a Roman, and an Englishman (Simon de Langham).[6]

The diocese of Montefiascone was erected by Pope Urban V by the papal bull, Cum Illius of 31 August 1369. He appointed the church of S. Margarita to serve as its cathedral, and he installed in it a Chapter composed of two dignities (the Dean and the Sacristan) and eight Canons with prebends. The Dean was to be elected by the Chapter and installed by the bishop, but the other offices were to be filled by appointment by the bishop. The territory for the diocese was taken from the diocese of Bagnoregio, and any properties or rights within that territory which belonged to the bishops of Bagnoregio, Castro, Orvieto, Viterbo or Tuscano were assigned to the bishop of Montefiascone.[7]

Pope Urban held another consistory for the creation of new cardinals at Montefiascone on 7 June 1370. Two cardinals were named, one a Florentine and the other from Rodez in France.[8] He departed from Montefiascone for Avignon on 26 August 1370, where he died on 19 December 1370.[9]

New dioceseEdit

Its first bishop was the French Augustinian Pierre d'Anguiscen, appointed in 1376.[10] In 1378, when the Western Schism began, Bishop Pierre became a partisan of Clement VII (Avignon Obedience), and he was therefore deposed by Urban VI (Roman Obedience).

On 5 December 1435, the diocese of Montefiascone was united with the diocese of Corneto in the person of the bishop; that is the bishop of Montefiascone was also at the same time the bishop of Corneto, with each diocese retaining its own institutional integrity.[11] The union continued until, in 1854, Corneto became a part of the diocese of Civitavecchia.

In 1483, Bishop Domenico della Rovere laid the cornerstone for the new cathedral of S. Margarita in Montefiascone, and in his Last Will and Testament in 1501 he left money to continue the work, which had barely reached the level of the main floor of the church at the time of his death.[12]

SynodsEdit

Cardinal Marcantonio Barbarigo (1687–1706) held a diocesan synod in the cathedral of Montefiascone on 1–3 June 1692.[13] Bishop Lodivio Zacchia held a diocesan synod in 1622.[14] Cardinal Jean-Siffrein Maury (1794–1816) held a diocesan synod.[15] Bishop Sebastiano Pompilio Bonaventura (1706–1734) presided over a diocesan synod on 16–18 June 1710.[16]

The erection of the diocesan seminary for Corneto and Montefiascone was the work of Cardinal Marcantonio Barbarigo.[17]

End of the dioceseEdit

By the middle of 1986, papal policy in the selection of bishops had concentrated in the person of Bishop Luigi Boccadoro: the Diocese of Viterbo e Tuscania, the diocese of Acquapendente (since 1951), the diocese of Montefiascone (since 1951), and the Administratorship of the diocese of Bagnoregio (since 1971); he was also the Abbot Commendatory of Monte Cimino. On September 30, 1986, Pope John Paul II moved to consolidate these several small dioceses by suppressing them and uniting their territories[18] into the diocese of Viterbo e Tuscania, whose name was changed to the Diocese of Viterbo.[19] The diocese of Montefiascone ceased to exist.

BishopsEdit

Diocese of MontefiasconeEdit

  • Pierre d'Anguiscen (1369–1378)[20]
  • Nicola Scarinci (1379–1398)[21]
  • Antonius (Porziani) (1398–1404)[22]
  • Andreas de Galeatiis (1404–c.1410?)[23]
  • Antonius de Anagnia (c.1410–1429)
  • Dominicus, O.P. (1429–1432)[24]
  • Petrus Antonius (1432–1435)[25]

Diocese of Corneto (Tarquinia) e MontefiasconeEdit

5 December 1435:[26] one bishop was the head of two dioceses at the same time
Latin Name: Cornetanus Tarquiniensis et Montisflasconsis

[Valentinus][28]
Sede vacante (1685–1687)[43]
Sede vacante (6 January 1752–14 January 1754) [47]
Sede vacante (1817–1820)

Diocese of MontefiasconeEdit

14 June 1854: United with the Diocese of Civitavecchia and then split into the Diocese of Montefiascone and the Diocese of Tarquinia e Civitavecchia[citation needed]
Immediately Subject to the Holy See

  • Luigi Jona (1854–1863)[57]
  • Giuseppe Maria Bovieri (22 Feb 1867 – 22 Apr 1873 Died)[58]
  • Concetto Focaccetti (25 Jul 1873 – 15 Jul 1878 Appointed, Bishop of Acquapendente)
  • Luigi Rotelli (15 Jul 1878 – 22 Dec 1882 Resigned)
  • Luciano Gentilucci (15 Mar 1883 – 29 Nov 1895 Appointed, Bishop of Fabriano e Matelica)
  • Domenico Rinaldi (29 Nov 1895 – 21 Apr 1907 Died)
  • Domenico Mannaioli (16 Aug 1907 – 6 Aug 1910 Resigned)
  • Giovanni Rosi (19 Dec 1910 – 5 Apr 1951 Died)
  • Luigi Boccadoro (14 Jun 1951 – 1986)[59]

30 September 1986: suppression of the diocese of Montefiascone.

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ Aloysius Tomassetti, ed. (1859). Bullarum diplomatum et privilegiorum sanctorum romanorum pontificum (in Latin). Tomus Quartus. Turin (Augusta Taurinorum): Seb. Franco, H. Fori et H. Dalmazzo editoribus. pp. 524–528.
  2. ^ "Diocese of Montefiascone" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  3. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Montefiascone" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  4. ^ M. Antonelli, Una relazione del vicario del Patrimonio a Giovanni XXII in Avignone," in: Archivio della Società romana di storia patria (in Italian). Vol. 18. Rome. 1895. pp. 452, 465. The Pope wrote, "...rectores Patrimonii beati Petri in Tuscia..... a longis retro temporibus, quorum memoria non existit, consueverunt cum sua curia residere."
  5. ^ M. Antonelli, "Vicende della dominizione pontificia nel Patrimonio d S. Pietro in Tuscia," in: Archivio della Società romana di storia patria (in Italian). Vol. 25. Roma. 1902. p. 356.
  6. ^ Eubel Hierarchia catholica I, p. 21.
  7. ^ Cappelletti, Le chiese d'Italia V, pp. 632-638.
  8. ^ Eubel I, p. 21.
  9. ^ De Angelis, pp. 27-32, provides data for the Pope's movements between 1368 and 1370. See, more generally, Johann Peter Kirsch, Die Ruckkehr der Papste Urban V. und Gregor XI. von Avignon nach Rom]] (Paderborn 1898) [Quellen und Forschungen, 6].
  10. ^ Cappelletti, p. 646. Gams, p. 706 column 1.
  11. ^ Eugenius IV, bull In Supremae Dignitatis, in: Bullarum diplomatum et privilegiorum sanctorum romanorum pontificum. Taurinensis editio (in Latin). Tomus V. Turin (Augusta Taurinorum): Seb. Franco, H. Fori et H. Dalmazzo editoribus. 1860. pp. 18–20. "Ecclesiarum, quam Montisflasconis Ecclesiam hodie etiam eidem Ecclesiae Corneianensi univimus, annexuimus el incorporavimus, cum de Corneto ad Montemflascon., vel e converso de Monteflascone Cornetum recto itinere se transferro contigerit, extra tamen civitates, terras et castra atque loca alia, etiam in alien. dioecesibus consistentia, in via tantummodo obviantibus benedictionem impendere valeat, absque aiiorum iniuria seu contradictione quacumque."
  12. ^ Hans Ost, "Santa Margherita in Montefiascone: A Centralized Building Plan of the Roman Quattrocento," The Art Bulletin, Vol. 52, No. 4 (December 1970), pp. 373-389, especially pp. 374-375, 378, 387-388.
  13. ^ Marcus Antonius Barbadicus (1693). Synodus dioecesana I Montis Falisci, & Corneti, quam Marcus Antonius Barbadicus S.R.E. presbyter cardinalis tit. S. Susannae supradictarum ciuitatum episcopus. Habuit anno 1692. Innocentio 12. Pont (in Latin). Rome: typis Reu. Cam. Apost.
  14. ^ Laudivio Zacchia (1623). Constitutiones ... D. Laudivii Zacchiae, episcopi Montisflasconis et Corneti, in synodo dioecesana habita ... 1622 (in Latin). Viterbo: ex typographia A. Discipuli.
  15. ^ The date is apparently unknown. Maury was in Montefiascone from 1794 to 1798, and again from 1800 to 1806. Antoine Ricard (1891). "A Montefiascone". Correspondance diplomatique et mémoires inédits du Cardinal Maury: 1792-1817 (in French). Tome premier. Lille: Desclée de Brouwer. pp. 156–179.
  16. ^ Synodus dioecesana ab illustrissimo, et reverendissimo d.d. Sebastiano Pompilio Bonaventura ... celebrata diebus 16. 17. et 18. Junii. Anno Domini 1710 (in Latin). Montefiascone: typis Seminarii. 1714.
  17. ^ Marco Antonio Barbarigo (1706). Instrumentum erectionis venerabilis Seminarii civitatis Montisfalisci & Corneti factae ab eminentissimo, & reverendissimo D.D. cardinali Marco Antonio Barbadico nobili Veneto Montisfalisci, & Corneti episcopo. Sub die sexta novembris anno 1703 . (in Latin). ex typographia Seminarii.
  18. ^ "in unam dioecesim iuridice redigeremus, satis enim eas coeptis, institutis, moribus, mente coaluisse....perpetuo unimus, unione, ut dicunt, exstinctiva; quae proinde adquiret atque comprehendet in suo territorio uniuscuiusque harum Ecclesiarum territorium"
  19. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis Vol. 78 (Città del Vaticano: Typis polyglottis vaticanis 1986), pp. 906-907.
  20. ^ D'Anguiscen was appointed by Pope Urban V on 7 August 1369. He was deposed by Urban VI on 9 November 1378, as a follower of Clement VII in the Western schism which began in that year. Charles-Louis Richard; Jean Joseph Giraud (1824). Bibliothèque sacrée, ou Dictionnaire universel, historique, dogmatique, canonique, géographique et chronologique des sciences ecclésiastiques (in French). Tome dix-septieme. Paris: Méquignon. p. 184. Josephus Lanteri (1874). Eremi sacrae Augustinianae (in Latin). Rome: B. Morini. pp. 115–116. Gams, p. 706. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 348.
  21. ^ Bishop Nicholas was also governor of the Patrimony of Saint Peter, from 1380. Cappelletti, p. 607. Gams, p. 706. Eubel I, p. 348.
  22. ^ A native of Alatri, Antonius had been a Canon and Subdeacon of the cathedral Chapter. He was appointed Bishop of Montefiascone on 18 August 1398. Bishop Antonius was transferred to the diocese of Sora by Pope Boniface IX on 27 February 1404. Eubel I, pp. 348, 458.
  23. ^ Andreas had previously been Bishop of Massa Maritima (1389–1390), and then of Assisi (1390–1404). Cappelletti, p. 607. Gams, p. 706. Eubel I, pp. 113, 329, 348.
  24. ^ Eubel I, p. 348.
  25. ^ Eubel II, p. 195.
  26. ^ Cappelletti, p. 655.
  27. ^ Dell'Orso had previously been Bishop of Nepi (1433–1435). He was transferred to the diocese of Montefiascone and to the diocese of Corneto by Pope Eugenius IV on 12 December 1435, only one week after the creation of the diocese of Corneto. The diocese of Nepi, which he vacated, was united with the diocese of Sutri. He was transferred to the diocese of Massa Marittima on 6 March 1439. He died in 1467. Cappelletti, p. 655. Eubel Hierarchia catholica II, pp. 137, 187, 202.
  28. ^ Valentinus, Bishop of Orte, was appointed by Eugenius IV to succeed Bishop Pietro dell'Orto in January 1437, but on 20 September 1437 Valentinus declined the transfer and resigned the two dioceses into the hands of the Pope. Eubel II, pp. 137, note 2; 166. Bishop Pietro apparently stayed on at Montefiascone e Corneto. Cappelletti, p. 655.
  29. ^ Vitelleschi was a member of the leading family of Corneto, the nephew of Cardinal Bartolomeo Vitelleschi, and brother of Pietro Vitelleschi, Castellan of the Rocca di Corneto. The cardinal was imprisoned in the Castel S. Angelo in Rome in 1440 for his opposition to Pope Eugenius IV and executed on 2 April; Pietro was deposed from his office as Castellan, and evicted by bribes and military force. Bishop Bartolomeo fled to Lausanne, where the Council of Basel was meeting, and embraced the party of Felix V. Pope Eugenius deposed him from the dioceses of Corneto e Montefiascone on 23 March 1442. On 6 May 1444, Felix V named him a cardinal. After the reconciliation between Eugenius and Felix, and after the death of Eugenius, Bishop Bartolomeo was reconciled to the new pope, Nicholas V, who restored him to the dioceses of Corneto e Montefiascone on 21 July 1448. He died on 13 December 1463. Gams, p. 706. Luigi Dasti (1878). Notizie storiche archeologiche di Tarquinia e Corneto (in Italian). Rome: Tipografia dell'Opinione. pp. 150–155. "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of April 6, 1444". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25..[self-published source] Eubel, Hierarchia catholica II, pp. 7 no. 3; 10 no. 24; 138.
  30. ^ Materio: Eubel II, p. 138.
  31. ^ Vitelleschi: Eubel Hierarchia catholica II, p. 138.
  32. ^ Eubel Hierarchia catholica II, p. 138.
  33. ^ Tolomei: Eubel Hierarchia catholica II, p. 138.
  34. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of February 10, 1478". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25..[self-published source]
  35. ^ On 28 Mar 1509 Farnese (the future Pope Paul III) was appointed Bishop of Parma. "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of September 20, 1493". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25..[self-published source]
  36. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of December 18, 1534". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25..[self-published source]
  37. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of May 17, 1570". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25..[self-published source]
  38. ^ "Bishop Girolamo Bentivoglio" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  39. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of March 3, 1599". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  40. ^ Born in 1565 in the castle of Vezzano in Genoese territory, Laudivio was the younger brother of Cardinal Paolo Emilio Zacchia. He obtained the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the University of Pisa. He held various offices in the Apostolic Camera, beginning in 1599, and culminating in the office of pro-Treasurer-General (1605). He was named Bishop of Montefiascone by Pope Paul V on 17 August 1605, and was consecrated by Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini on 28 August. He administered the diocese through his Vicar General, his nephew Gaspare Cecchinelli. Zacchia was appointed Vice-Legate of the Patrimony of St. Peter, and in 1621 papal Nuncio in Venice. In 1622 he presided over a diocesan synod in Montefiascone. He was serving as Prefect of the Papal Household (Majordomo) when he was appointed a cardinal by Paul V on 19 January 1626. He died in Rome on 30 August 1637, at the age of 72. De Angelis, pp. 63-64. Thomas F. Mayer (2013). The Roman Inquisition: A Papal Bureaucracy and Its Laws in the Age of Galileo. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 78–80. ISBN 0-8122-4473-7. "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of January 19, 1626". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 20. no. 9.
  41. ^ Paluzzi was the founder of the seminary and restorer of the cathedral, which was damaged by a fire in 1670. He was transferred to the diocese of Ravenna on 19 May 1670. "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of January 14, 1664". Fiu.edu. 2011-06-29. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  42. ^ A native Roman, Domenico Massimi held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the Sapienza in Rome. He was appointed Bishop of Montefiascone on 18 March 1671 by Pope Clement X, and consecrated on 30 March by Cardinal Camillo Massimi. He died in September 1685. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 274 with note 2. David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy.org, "Bishop Domenico Massimo"; retrieved 8 August 2016.[self-published source]
  43. ^ Cappelletti, p. 669.
  44. ^ Barbarigo came from the diocese of Padua, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the University of Padua. He became a Canon of the cathedral Chapter of Padua. He had been Archbishop of Corcyra (Corfù) from 1678 to 1687, and was named a cardinal on 2 September 1686. He was transferred to the diocese of Montefiascone e Corneto by Pope Innocent XI on 7 July 1687. He gave great assistance after the earthquake of 1695; he founded the Maestre Pie Filippini. He died on 26 May 1706. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, pp. 172 with note 2; 274 with note 3. Pietro Bergamaschi (1986). From the Land of the Etruscans: The Life of Lucy Filippini. Ed. di Storia e Letteratura. pp. 15–20. GGKEY:8XAZF37NXZ7.Salvador Miranda, "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of September 2, 1686". Fiu.edu. 2007-07-06. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  45. ^ Born in Urbino in 1651, Bonaventura held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (1675), and had been Canon of the cathedral Chapter. During the Sede vacante of 1684, he served as Vicar Capitular, and in the new administration he was Vicar General. He was then Vicar General of the diocese of Capua (from 1687). He had previously been Bishop of Gubbio (1690–1706). He was transferred to the diocese of Montefiascone e Corneto on 15 November 1706 by Pope Clement XI. On the evening of 1 September 1719, in the episcopal palace, Bishop Bonaventura presided at the marriage of James Stuart (the "Old Pretender") and Maria Clementina Sobieski, daughter of King John III of Poland. He died in May 1734. Great Britain. Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts (1887). Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts. Tenth Report, Appendix, Part VI. London: H.M. Stationery Office. pp. 254–255. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, pp. 197 with note 3; 274 with note 4.
  46. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of March 24, 1734". Fiu.edu. 1925-10-10. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  47. ^ Bishop Mario Antonio Maffei of Foligno was appointed Apostolic Administrator on 12 Apr 1752, and resigned upon the appointment of a successor. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, pp. 220; 294, note 2.
  48. ^ Giustiniani was born in Chieti and was a patrician of Genoa. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Camerino, 1730), and held the office of sub-datary of the Tribune of the Signature of Grace, and the secretaryship of the Congregation for Loreto and Avignon; he was a canonical expert in the Apostolic Penitentiary. He was named Bishop of Montefiascone e Corneto on 14 January 1754 by Pope Benedict XIV, and consecrated in Rome on 2 February by Cardinal Francesco Landi. He died in Montefiascone on 13 January 1771. Cappelletti, p. 677. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 294-295, with note 3.
  49. ^ Banditi was born in Rimini in 1706. He served as Visitor and as Provost General of his Congregation. He was named Bishop of Montefiascone e Corneto on 30 March 1772, and was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Lazzaro Pallavicini on 5 April 1772. On 29 May 1775 Banditi was named Archbishop of Benevento, and on the previous day had been named Apostolic Administrator of Montefiascone e Corneto through the month of December 1775. On 23 December 1775, Lorenzo de Dominici was named Apostolic Administrator. Cappelletti, p. 677. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, pp. 121 with note 7; 295 with note 4."The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of July 17, 1775". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  50. ^ Garampi was Prefect of the Vatican Archives from 1751 to 1772. He was transferred from the titular archbishopric of Berytus (Beirut) to Montefiascone by Pope Pius VI on 20 May 1776, and allowed to keep the title of archbishop. He was papal Nuncio in Vienna from 1776 to 1785. He gave books from his library to the seminary of Montefiascone. He died in Rome on 4 May 1792. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, pp. 34; 44; 121 with note 2; 295 with note 5"The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of February 14, 1785". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.[self-published source]
  51. ^ Maury was appointed a cardinal by Pope Pius VI on 10 February 1794. He was named bishop of Montefiascone on 21 February 1794. He died on 10 May 1817. Louis Sifrein Maury (1828). Vie du cardinal Jean Sifrein Maury: avec des notes et des pièces justificatives (in French). Paris: Gayet. Antoine Ricard (1891). "A Montefiascone". Correspondance diplomatique et mémoires inédits du Cardinal Maury: 1792-1817 (in French). Tome premier. Lille: Desclée de Brouwer. pp. 156–179. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, pp. 38 no. 67; 295 with note 6. "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of February 21, 1794". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  52. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of May 3, 1824". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  53. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of July 2, 1832". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  54. ^ Ferretti was transferred from the diocese of Rieti (1827–1837) to the diocese of Montefiascone on 19 May 1837 by Pope Gregory XVI. After less than five months, on 2 Oct 1837, Ferretti was appointed Archbishop of Fermo. He was named a cardinal in 1838, and died on 13 September 1860. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, pp. 195, 270, 319, 341; VIII, p. 45. "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of November 30, 1838". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  55. ^ On 27 Jan 1842, de Angelis was appointed, Archbishop of Fermo. "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of September 13, 1838". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  56. ^ "The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church - Biographical Dictionary - Consistory of January 22, 1844". Fiu.edu. Retrieved 2015-06-25.
  57. ^ Jona was born in Trevi (Abbadia di Subiaco) in 1811. He had been Vicar General of the suburbicarian diocese of Palestrina, and was Archdeacon of the cathedral Chapter. He was appointed Bishop of Montefiascone on 23 June 1854. During his reign, the diocese had 24,925 members. He died on 30 November 1863. Gaetano Moroni, ed. (1861). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica (in Italian). Vol. 102. Venice: dalla Tipografia Emiliana. pp. 6–7. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VIII, p. 393.
  58. ^ Bovieri was born in Ceccano (Diocese of Ferentino) in 1800. He was appointed Bishop of Montefiascone on 22 February 1867. He attended the First Vatican Council in 1869–1870. La Gerarchia Cattolica e la Famiglia Pontificia, per l'anno 1873 (in Italian). Rome: Monaldi. 1873. p. 203. Bruno Bellone (1966). I vescovi dello stato Pontificio al Concilio Vaticano I (in Italian). Roma: Libreria editrice della pontificia Università Lateranense. pp. 43–44.
  59. ^ On 27 Mar 1986 appointed Bishop of Viterbo, Acquapendente, Bagnoregio, Montefiascone, Tuscania e San Martino al Monte Cimino. On 30 September 1986, the dioceses were unified as the Diocese of Viterbo.

BibliographyEdit

Reference worksEdit

StudiesEdit

External linksEdit

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.