William Stukus (May 15, 1916 – July 1, 2003) was a Canadian football quarterback.

Bill Stukus
Born:(1916-05-15)May 15, 1916
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Died:July 1, 2003(2003-07-01) (aged 87)
Toronto, Ontario, Canada[1]
Career information
StatusRetired
CFL statusNational
Position(s)QB/S
Height5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight175 lb (79 kg)
CollegeSt. Michael's
Career history
As player
19361941Toronto Argonauts
1942–1943Toronto RCAF Hurricanes
1945–1946Toronto Indians
1947Toronto Argonauts
19491951Edmonton Eskimos
Career highlights and awards
CFL All-Star1939, 1942, 1945
AwardsImperial Oil Trophy (1942)
HonoursGrey Cup champion (1937, 1938, 1942, 1947)

Stukus started with the Toronto Argonauts, winning a Grey Cup in 1937 and 1938, and being named an all-star.[2] Perhaps his best season was in 1942, with the wartime all-military Toronto RCAF Hurricanes, when he was an all-star, won a third Grey Cup and was the Ontario Rugby Football Union Imperial Oil Trophy winner as MVP. He played with the Toronto Indians and then returned to the Argonauts in 1947, winning his fourth Grey Cup. He played 48 regular season and 17 playoff games for the Argos.[3] He finished his career playing three seasons with the Edmonton Eskimos.[4]

While serving in the RCAF during the war, he also had the good fortune to play in the famed Tea Bowl, where the Canadian Army football team defeated the American Army team 16–6 at White City Stadium on February 13, 1944 in London, England.[5]

Bill was one of the famed Stukus brothers. Bill and his brothers Annis and Frank played together in the offensive backfield of the 1938 Grey Cup champion Argonaut team.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Births, Deaths, In Memoriam". Toronto Star. July 5, 2003. p. B7.
  2. ^ CFL Veterans Archived 2009-09-15 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ 2008 Toronto Argonauts Media Guide
  4. ^ PLAYER #69 - BILL STUKUS (1936-41, 47)
  5. ^ The coffee & tea bowls: football classics: Canada vs. the United States in wartime London as Spitfires fly cover.
  6. ^ Home of the Game - 1938 "Seeing Red" by Garth Woolsey, Toronto Star, November 22, 2007