Beyeren Armorial

The Beyeren Armorial is a manuscript roll of arms of the early 15th century, containing 1096 hand-colored coats of arms, with annotations in Middle Dutch. It is held by in the National Library of the Netherlands in The Hague (KB), shelf mark 79 K 21.[1]

Beyeren Armorial
National Library of the Netherlands, signature KB 79 K21
Wapenboek Beyeren (armorial) - KB79K21 - folios 001v (left) and 002r (right).jpg
First page spread (foll. 1v–2r) of the Beyeren Armorial
TypeArmorial
DateBetween 1402 and 1405, the book was completed on 23 June 1405. Binding is from 1581
Place of originHolland, The Hague
Language(s)Annotations in Dutch
Author(s)Claes Heynenzoon
MaterialParchment and paper
Size62 folia
FormatCirca 230 x 155 mm
ScriptLittera cursiva
ContentsFive series:
  1. (fol. 1r-8v, 18r-28v): 337 coats of arms from participants in a tournament in Compiègne; February 1238
  2. (fol. 28v-35v, 49r-52v): 191 coats of arms from participants in a tournament in Mons; 1310
  3. (fol. 52v-57v, 36r-48v, 9r-13r): 404 coats of arms from participants in a raid against the Frisians in Kuinre; 1396
  4. (fol. 13r-17v, 58r-60r): 122 coats of arms from participants in the siege of Gorinchem; 1402
  5. (fol. 60r-62v): 14 series of The Three Best
Illumination(s)1096 hand-colored coats of arms
AccessionDescription of the Beyeren Armorial in the catalogue of the KB]
OtherDigitized version, website KB (in Dutch)
On the left folio it is stated that the book was completed on 23 June 1405: Explicit iste liber per manus beyeren quondam gelre armorum regis de ruris [anno domini milesimo quadringentesimo quinto in profesto sancti Johannis baptiste]. Translation: Here endeth this book by the hand of Bavaria, formerly Guelders, Ruwieren King of Arms [in the year of our Lord one thousand four hundred and five on the day before Saint John the Baptist's Day]

HistoryEdit

The manuscript was compiled at the court of Holland and was completed on 23 June 1405 by Claes Heynenzoon (c.1345−1414). He was Ruwieren King of Arms, the chief herald of the Netherlands around 1400. He is also the creator of the Gelre (Guelders) Armorial, for which he has also been referred to as the "Gelre Herald".

ContentsEdit

The manuscripts is divided into 5 series or chapters

  • I (fol. 1r–8v, 18r–28v): 337 coats of arms from participants in a tournament in Compiègne, "February 1238" [mccxxxviii]: the indicated date is likely in error (as many of the coats of arms would be anachronistic), perhaps 1278 [mcclxxviii] is intended (the coat of arms of the king of Sicily is that of Anjou, for Charles I, r. 1266–1285); the Luxebourg lion for "Henry of Luxembourg" would then be in reference to Henry VI (1240–1288), father of emperor Henry VII.
  • II (fol. 28v–35v, 49r–52v): 191 coats of arms from participants in a tournament in Mons; 1310
  • III (fol. 52v–57v, 36r–48v, 9r–13r): 404 coats of arms from participants in a raid against the Frisians in Kuinre; 1396
  • IV (fol. 13r–17v, 58r–60r): 122 coats of arms from participants in the siege of Gorinchem; 1402
  • V (fol. 60r–62v): 14 series of The Three Best, by given name ("the three best Johns", "the three best Williams", etc. )

Fol. 64v has a doodle of heart symbols pierced by arrows with the maxim Wacht u, dool ich ("you wake, I sleep").

ReferencesEdit

  • Beelaerts van Blokland, W.A. (1933) Beyeren quondam Gelre armorum rex de Ruyris. Eene historisch-heraldische studie, (The Hague)
  • Anrooij, W. van (1990) Spiegel van ridderschap. Heraut Gelre en zijn ereredes. (Amsterdam, Prometheus)
  • Verbij-Schillings, Jeanne (1995) Beeldvorming in Holland. Heraut Beyeren en de historiografie omstreeks 1400 (Amsterdam, Prometheus)
  • Verbij-Schillings, Jeanne (1999) Het Haagsche handschrift van heraut Beyeren. Hs. Den Haag, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, 131 G 37 (Hilversum, Verloren)

External linksEdit