Behar (magazine)

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Behar was a Bosniak political magazine published twice monthly between 1900 and 1911.[2] The word behar (blossom in Bosnian) derives from Persian bahār (spring, blossom).[3] It was established in 1900 by Bosniak intellectuals Edhem Mulabdić, Safvet-beg Bašagić, and Osman Nuri Hadžić, assisted financially by Ademaga Mešić.

Behar
Behar logo.jpg
FrequencyBiweekly
PublisherAdemaga Mešić
FounderEdhem Mulabdić, Safvet-beg Bašagić, Osman Nuri Hadžić
First issue1 May 1900
Final issue1911[1]
CountryBosnia and Herzegovina
Based inSarajevo
LanguageBosnian, Croatian

During the first eight years of existence it was primarily focused on religious and family topics.[2] Magazine published articles on Islamic past and religion, literally works of local authors and translations of Oriental literature.[2] In VII volume it regularly published 4 pages of text in Turkish language, while from the IX volume it was also marked as an Croatian magazine.[2] The magazine was published in Gaj's Latin alphabet.[2]

In addition to Bašagić and Mulabdić, Musa Ćazim Ćatić, Džemaludin Čaušević, and Ljudevit Dvorniković also served as editors during the decade that the magazine was published.[4]

A 1927 revival, called Novi behar (New Blossom), by Hamdija Kreševljaković and Husein Dubravić lasted until 1943.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "O Beharu". Behar. Archived from the original on 3 April 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e Aleksa Mikić (1971). Živan Milisavac (ed.). Jugoslovenski književni leksikon [Yugoslav Literary Lexicon] (in Serbo-Croatian). Novi Sad (SAP Vojvodina, SR Serbia): Matica srpska. p. 33.
  3. ^ Afnan, Elham (2010). "Finding Myself: Loanwords as Aids to Identity-Building". In Mišić Ilić, Biljana; Lopičić, Vesna (eds.). Identity Issues: Literary and Linguistic Landscapes. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. p. 222.
  4. ^ "Survey, Volume 3". University of Sarajevo. 1976. Retrieved 6 April 2016 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ "Novi behar, Volume 7". Islamska dionička štamparija. 1933. Retrieved 6 April 2016 – via Google Books.