Asian Karatedo Federation

The Asian Karate Federation (AKF) is the governing body of sport karate of about 39 countries of karatedo federation in Asia.[2] The AKF is a non-profit organization and performs its activities on an amateur basis in compliance with the principles set forth in the Olympic Charter, duly recognized by the World Karate Federation, the largest international governing body of sport karate with over 180 member countries. It is the only karate organization recognised by the International Olympic Committee and has more than fifty million members. The AKF organizes the Asian Karatedo Championships, the Junior and Senior AKF Championships in every two years in between the Olympic and Asian Games and participates in WKF World Karate Championships. The President of the AKF is Major Gen Nasser Al Sayed Abdulrazak Alrazooqi of UAE and Mr. Kuong Im Che of Macau, China serves as the Secretary General.

Asian Karate Federation
AbbreviationAKF
Formation1973[1]
Legal statusFederation
HeadquartersHeadquarters of the AKF is situated in the country/region the elected President resides.
Location
Region served
Asian Continental countries/regions
Membership
39 Affiliated Countries
Official language
English is the official language. If any question in respect to the sport or technique of karate, it will be referred to the original Japanese text.
President
Major Gen Nasser Al Sayed Abdulrazak Alrazooqi of United Arab Emirates
Websitehttp://asiankaratefederation.net/

History of AKFEdit

Asian Karatedo Federation founded as APUKO (Asian Pacific Union of Karatedo Organizations) in the year 1973.

It changed to AUKO (Asian Union of Karatedo Organizations) in 1992 after WUKO was admitted to IOC.

The name was changed again in 1999 to AKF (Asian Karatedo Federation) in line with World Union of Karate-Do Organizations (WUKO) changed to World Karate Federation (WKF).[3]

AKF Country Member's FederationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Black Belt July 1973". July 1973. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  2. ^ [1] Archived January 22, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ [2] Archived October 2, 2009, at the Wayback Machine

External linksEdit