Ankhkherednefer

Ankhkherednefer (Ancient Egyptian: ˁnḫ ẖrd nfr, lit.''The beautiful child lives'')[1] (name formerly read as Ankhrenepnefer, or Ankhsherynefer) was an ancient Egyptian official known from a block statue found in the Tell el-Maskhuta (perhaps ancient Pithom). The statue, made of red granite is now in the British Museum (BM 1007).

Ankhkherednefer's official titles in hieroglyphs
rwD
aA
S3aH

Rwḏw-ˁ3-n-ˁḥ
Great Inspector of the Palace
HASHM12A2F35HASHO1C12nba
n
N18

Sḫ3-nfr-n-pr-Tm-nb-ˁjn
Good scribe of the Temple of Atum, Lord of Tura[note 1]
pt
F21
D40
nh
aA
A44

Ḥrj-jdnw-n-pr-ˁ3
Supreme Lieutenant of the Pharaoh
Ankhkherednefer.jpg
Block statue of Ankhkherednefer

BiographyEdit

anxXrdnfr
Ankhkherednefer
Era: New Kingdom
(1550–1069 BC)
Egyptian hieroglyphs

Ankhkherednefer served under king Osorkon II whose name appears on the statue. On the statue he bears the titles: Great Inspector of the Palace; Good scribe of the Temple of Atum, Lord of Tura[note 1] and Supreme Lieutenant of the Pharaoh.

ReferencesEdit

Notes
  1. ^ a b The god is reproduced in original with double crown and without scepter. In the inscription, the god Atum was also dubbed Lord of An (Tura). An could be identified archaeologically with the place Tura.[2]
Citations
  1. ^ Hermann Ranke (1935). Die Ägyptischen Personennamen - Band I (PDF) (in German). Augustin, Glückstadt. p. 66.
  2. ^ Kathryn A. Bard (1999). Encyclopaedia of the Archeology of ancient Egypt. Routledge, London. p. 958. ISBN 0-415-18589-0.

LiteratureEdit

  • Edouard Naville: The Store-city of Pithom and the Route of the Exodus, London, 1885, S. 13-14 with English translations of the texts, Frontispice, Text on plate IV). online
  • Karl Jansen-Winkeln: Ägyptische Biographien der 22. und 23. Dynasstie, Teil 1, Wiesbaden 1985, S. 269-71 ISBN 3-447-02525-5
  • Karl Jansen-Winkeln: Inschriften der Spätzeit, Bd. II: Die 22.-24. Dynastie, Wiesbaden, 2007, S. 126-127

External linksEdit