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Andy Kelly (born 8 November 1960), also known by the nicknames of "Boot", and "Big Andy", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s, 2000s and 2010s. He played at representative level for England, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 868) (two spells) (captain), Hull Kingston Rovers (Heritage №) and the Illawarra Steelers (unused interchange/substitute in the 24-8 victory over Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks at Endeavour Field, Sydney on Sunday 24 June 1984), as a second-row,[1] and has coached at representative level for Ireland, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity/Wakefield Trinity Wildcats, Gateshead Thunder, Featherstone Rovers and the Dewsbury Rams.[3]

Andrew Kelly
Andy Kelly (10 November 2008).jpg
Andy Kelly 2008
Personal information
Born (1960-11-08) 8 November 1960 (age 58)
Wakefield, England
Playing information
Height6 ft 4 in (193 cm)
Weight17 st 4 lb (110 kg)
PositionSecond-row
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1980–82 Wakefield Trinity 46 15 0 0 42
1983–88 Hull Kingston Rovers 29 0 0 116
1989–93 Wakefield Trinity 109 15 0 0 40
Total 155 59 0 0 198
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1984 England 1 0 0 0 0
Coaching information
Club
Years Team Gms W D L W%
1997–00 Wakefield Trinity
2001–02 Gateshead Thunder
2002–03 Featherstone Rovers
2003–08 Dewsbury Rams
2016 Huddersfield Giants 2 2 0 0 100
Total 2 2 0 0 100
Representative
Years Team Gms W D L W%
1998–11 Ireland
Source: [1][2][3]

Contents

BackgroundEdit

Andy Kelly was born in Wakefield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England.

Playing careerEdit

International honoursEdit

Andy Kelly won a cap for England while at Wakefield Trinity in 1984 against Wales.[2]

Challenge Cup Final appearancesEdit

Andy Kelly played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Hull Kingston Rovers' 14–15 defeat by Castleford in the 1983–84 Challenge Cup Final during the 1984–85 season at Wembley Stadium, London, on Saturday 3 May 1986, in front of a crowd of 82,134.

County Cup Final appearancesEdit

Andy Kelly played right-second-row, i.e. number 12, in Hull Kingston Rovers' 12–29 defeat by Hull F.C. in the 1984–85 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1984–85 season at Boothferry Park, Kingston upon Hull, on Saturday 27 October 1984, played as an interchange/substitute, i.e. number 15, (replacing Second-row Phil Hogan) in the 22–18 victory over Castleford in the 1985–86 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1985–86 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds, on Sunday 27 October 1985, and played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, and was captain in Wakefield Trinity's 8–11 defeat by Castleford in the 1990–91 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1990–91 season at Elland Road, Leeds, on Sunday 23 September 1990.

John Player Special Trophy Final appearancesEdit

Andy Kelly played right-second-row, i.e. number 12, in Hull Kingston Rovers' 8–11 defeat by Wigan in the 1985–86 John Player Special Trophy Final during the 1985–86 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Saturday 11 January 1986.[4]

Playing careerEdit

During his time at Wakefield Trinity he scored fifteen 3-point tries and, fifteen 4-point tries.

Coaching careerEdit

He is the former head coach of the Ireland national rugby league team having coached them for over 11 years.[5] He is the former coach of Dewsbury Rams, Wakefield Trinity/Wakefield Trinity Wildcats, Featherstone Rovers and Gateshead.

He is currently head of youth at Huddersfield Giants and recently helped the Giants Academy team reach the grand final play offs for the first time

Genealogical informationEdit

Andy Kelly is one of three brothers to have played professional Rugby league; Neil Kelly played for Wakefield Trinity, Dewsbury Rams, Hunslet and Featherstone Rovers and Richard Kelly played for Wakefield Trinity and Dewsbury Rams during the 1980s and 1990s.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. ^ a b "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 18 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. ^ "1985–1986 John Player Special Trophy Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. ^ "Ireland Name World Cup 40 Man Training Squad". Rugby League Ireland. 1 August 2008. Retrieved 2 August 2008.[dead link]

External linksEdit