Andrew Wilson (architect)

Andrew Oswald Wilson (1866–1950), known professionally as A. Oswald Wilson,[2] was an early-20th-century Western Australian architect.[3] Born and trained as a carpenter in Victoria, he moved first to Perth and then to the Eastern Goldfields (in December 1899[4][5]), where he worked for Murdock McKay Hopkins.[3] He was president of the Mechanics' Literary and Debating Society (also known as the Boulder Literary Society) in Boulder from 1904[6] to 1908,[7][2] as well as active in the Boulder Benevolent Society.[8] One of his best-known buildings is the Boulder town hall for which he submitted designs in 1907.[9] In December 1908[4] he moved back to Perth and practised from Forrest Chambers (at 62 St George’s Terrace).[3]

Andrew Oswald Wilson
1908-07-14 Oswald Wilson.jpg
Portrait from the Kalgoorlie Western Argus, published for the opening of the Town Hall in 1908.[1]
Born(1866-10-12)October 12, 1866
DiedJune 19, 1950(1950-06-19) (aged 83)
OccupationArchitect
BuildingsBoulder Town Hall

On 17 December 1910, aged 44, he married May Livingstone in Perth,[3] and in 1917 they left Australia for England, where Wilson enlisted in the Army.[3]

Wilson died on 19 June 1950 at St Andrew's Hospital in Melbourne.[3] He was 83.[10]

BuildingsEdit

In chronological order.

Perth:

  • 1899: West Perth Tennis Club (tennis courts at rear of West Perth Presbyterian Church)[11]

Boulder (where he was "responsible for most of the more prominent buildings about the Boulder"[5]):

  • St Matthew's Rectory and Church
  • Woman's Christian Temperance Union Girls' Home
  • Dr Frank Sawell's residence and surgery (121 Piesse Street)
  • 1908: Boulder Town Hall[12]

Perth:

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "BOULDER TOWN HALL". Kalgoorlie Western Argus. XIII (713). Western Australia. 14 July 1908. p. 19. Retrieved 19 June 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ a b "LITERARY AND DEBATING". The Evening Star. 11 (3169). Western Australia. 7 July 1908. p. 3. Retrieved 30 July 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Taylor, John J. (July 2013), A. Oswald Wilson (PDF)
  4. ^ a b "PERSONAL". Evening Star (Boulder, WA : 1898 - 1921). 11 December 1908. p. 3. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Personal". The Evening Star. III (993). Western Australia. 4 July 1901. p. 3. Retrieved 30 July 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Boulder Literary Society". Kalgoorlie Miner. 8 (2800). Western Australia. 14 September 1904. p. 4. Retrieved 30 July 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY". The Evening Star. 10 (2801). Western Australia. 16 April 1907. p. 4 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved 30 July 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "BOULDER BENEVOLENT SUNDAY". The Evening Star. 9 (2579). Western Australia. 27 July 1906. p. 3 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved 18 August 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "BOULDER TOWN HALL". Kalgoorlie Western Argus. WA: National Library of Australia. 20 August 1907. p. 16. Retrieved 20 November 2015.
  10. ^ William Wilson's family (1839 to 2-5-1914), retrieved 15 December 2017
  11. ^ "LAWN TENNIS". Western Mail. XIV (683). Western Australia. 27 January 1899. p. 34. Retrieved 28 August 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "BOULDER BUDGET". The Sun (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1898 - 1919). Kalgoorlie, WA: National Library of Australia. 23 February 1908. p. 9. Retrieved 20 November 2015.
  13. ^ "Untitled". Western Mail. XXVIII (1, 440). Western Australia. 1 August 1913. p. 31. Retrieved 16 August 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "WEST PERTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH". The West Australian. XXIX (3, 456). Western Australia. 12 May 1913. p. 7. Retrieved 16 August 2019 – via National Library of Australia.

External linksEdit