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Andrew C. Brock

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Andrew C. Brock (born April 9, 1974) served almost eight terms (2003-2017) as a Republican member of the North Carolina General Assembly representing the state's thirty-fourth Senate district, including constituents in Davie, Iredell and Rowan counties. He also served as the Republican deputy whip in the Senate.[1]

Senator

Andrew C. Brock
Andrew C Brock.jpg
Member of the North Carolina Senate
from the 34th district
In office
Jan. 2003 – June 30, 2017
Preceded byT.L. "Fountain" Odom
Personal details
Born (1974-04-09) April 9, 1974 (age 45)
Davie County, North Carolina
Nationality United States
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Andrea
Children3
ResidenceMocksville, North Carolina
Alma materWestern Carolina University
OccupationConsultant
Websitewww.andrewbrock.com

Education and early careerEdit

Brock is a lifelong resident of Davie County. Brock's grandfather, Burr Brock, Sr., served in the North Carolina House of Representatives, as well as the Senate. He is a graduate of Davie County High School.

Brock graduated Western Carolina University, in Cullowhee, North Carolina, where he majored in economics and political science. Brock was active in the Student Government Association and served as student body president. He was a member of the governing board of the University of North Carolina Association of Student Governments. He was also a member of the Western Carolina University Board of Trustees and the Pi Gamma Mu International Honor Society.

After college, Brock worked for the Conference on Poverty to work toward welfare reform in North Carolina. He then worked for United States Senator Lauch Faircloth's re-election campaign. Bill Cobey hired Brock to work as campaign manager on Cobey's campaign for chairman of the North Carolina Republican Party. Brock then worked for the Republican Party of North Carolina. He then worked as a campaign manager for U.S. Congressman Walter Jones. Brock also worked for Citizens for a Sound Economy.

State SenateEdit

Brock was elected to the North Carolina Senate in the fall of 2002. He acted as the deputy Republican whip.[1] Brock was at times the chairman of the Finance Committee, Natural and Economic Resources Appropriations Committee, Agriculture/ Environment/ Natural Resources Committee, General Government, Health & Human Services Committee, and Joint Information Technology Oversight Committee. Brock served as vice-chairman of the Redistricting committee. He also served as a member of the Joint Governmental Operations Committee, the Finance Committee, the Senate Rules Committee, Appropriations/Base Budget Committee, Program Evaluation Committee, the Emergency Response and Preparedness Committee, Joint Education Oversight Committee, Judiciary 1, and the Ways and Means Committee.

He resigned in 2017 to accept a position on the Board of Review for the state Division of Employment Security.[2]

Run for CongressEdit

Brock announced on February 22, 2016 that he would run for the United States House of Representatives in the newly reconfigured 13th congressional district.[3] Incumbent George Holding had previously announced that he would run in the 2nd district rather than stand for reelection in the 13th.

Brock lost the June 2016 Republican primary to Ted Budd.[4]

Personal lifeEdit

Brock is married to Andrea Gentry of the Pino Community in Davie County, and together they have two daughters and one son, Scarlett Hope, Stella Faith, and Turner Ward.[5]

Electoral historyEdit

Electoral History of Andrew C. Brock, current North Carolina Senator for the 34th State Senate district covering Rowan and Davie Counties.

North Carolina Senate District 38 Republican Primary Election 2000[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry W. Potts 2,796 25.76
Republican Stan Bingham 2,738 25.23
Republican James B. Neely 2,493 22.97
Republican Andrew Brock 2,343 21.59
Republican Nicholas A. Slogick 292 2.69
Republican Nate Pendley 190 1.75
Majority 58 0.53
Total votes 10,852 100.00
North Carolina Senate District 34 Republican Primary Election 2002[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew C. Brock 6,816 36.69
Republican Gus Andrews 5,972 32.15
Republican Mac Butner 4,830 26.00
Republican Baxter (Bo) Turner 957 5.15
Majority 844 4.54
Total votes 18,575 100.00
North Carolina Senate District 34 General Election 2002[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew C. Brock 28,593 60.19
Democratic John Carlyle Sherrill, III 17,625 37.10
Libertarian J. Conrad Jones 1,290 2.72
Majority 10968 23.09
Total votes 18,575 100.00
North Carolina Senate District 34 Republican Primary Election 2004[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew C. Brock 7,726 66.76
Republican Gus Andrews 3,846 33.24
Majority 3880 33.53
Total votes 11,572 100.00
North Carolina Senate District 34 General Election 2004[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew C. Brock 41,800 63.31
Democratic Larry C. Brown 24,223 36.69
Majority 17577 26.62
Total votes 66,023 100.00
North Carolina Senate District 34 General Election 2006[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew C. Brock 21,608 60.60
Democratic Larry C. Brown 14,048 39.40
Majority 7560 21.20
Total votes 35,656 100.00
North Carolina Senate District 34 General Election 2008[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew C. Brock 47,960 61.17
Democratic William A. Burnette 30,443 38.83
Majority 17517 22.34
Total votes 78,403 100.00
North Carolina Senate District 34 General Election 2010[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew C. Brock (unopposed) 36,969 100.00
Majority 36969 100.00
Total votes 36,969 100.00

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Project Vote Smart - Senator Andrew C. Brock - Biography
  2. ^ WRAL.com
  3. ^ Colin Campbell (2016). "NC Sen. Andrew Brock to run for Congress under new map". The News & Observer. Retrieved 2016-02-23.
  4. ^ NC State Board of Elections
  5. ^ http://www.andrewbrock.com
  6. ^ "NC Primary Election Results 2000". NC State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2008-11-27. Retrieved 21 August 2011.
  7. ^ "NC Primary Election Results 2002". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 21 August 2011.[permanent dead link]
  8. ^ "NC General Election Results 2002". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 21 August 2011.[permanent dead link]
  9. ^ "NC Primary Election Results 2004". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 21 August 2011.[permanent dead link]
  10. ^ "NC General Election Results 2004". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 21 August 2011.[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ "NC General Election Results 2006". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 21 August 2011.[permanent dead link]
  12. ^ "NC General Election Results 2008". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 21 August 2011.
  13. ^ "NC General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 21 August 2011.

External linksEdit