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Amok trey (Khmer: អាម៉ុកត្រី or ហហ្មុកត្រី - "haa mok trəy") also known as amok trei or fish amok is a traditional dish of Cambodian cuisine. It involves fish being coated in coconut milk with kroeung and steamed in banana leaves.[1][2][3] It is often eaten during the Water Festival, which celebrates the reversal of the Tonle Sap River. An important part of the dish is the addition of the leaves of the noni tree and the use of fingerroot.[4]

Amok trey
2016 Phnom Penh, Amok trey (01).jpg
Amok trey, a popular Khmer dish
TypeCurry
Place of originCambodia, Thailand
Associated national cuisineCambodia
Created byCambodian cuisine
Main ingredientsFish, coconut milk, kroeung

Fish amok is widely claimed to be Cambodia's national dish.[5][6][7][8] Despite this fact, it is not a dish that is commonly eaten by Cambodian people, and is much more commonly consumed by tourists.[9][10] Cambodian fish amok is not a uniquely Cambodian invention, but in fact derives from Thai fish ho mok.[11] Little has been written about the history of Cambodian fish amok, and sources largely do not make it clear the extent to which authentic Cambodian fish amok differs from Thai fish ho mok. One obvious difference, however, would be the use of kroeung, which is a Cambodian ingredient. Amok trey also tends to be far less creamy than ho mok.

The vast majority of restaurants in Cambodia serve an inauthentic version of amok trey to tourists, because of the difficulty and time required to make authentic amok trey.[12][13][14] Another way that restaurants often serve inauthentic fish amok is by baking the dish, rather than steaming it. Authentic amok trey should always be steamed, rather than baked, otherwise the dish is not amok trey by definition.[15][16][17][18][19][20]

Many restaurants in Cambodia also serve other versions of "amok", such as amok with chicken, beef, or vegetables. However, these dishes are modern creations and not traditional Cambodian food.[21] Only amok trey should be considered a part of Cambodian cuisine.

See alsoEdit

  • Ho mok - a regional overview of the dish.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Cambodian Fish Amok Recipe – an Authentic Steamed Fish Curry in the Old Style". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  2. ^ "Fish Amok, Cambodia's National Dish". Asia Society. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  3. ^ Amok Trei Fish Mousselline (dead link) Archived 2007-09-29 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Dining In Cambodia". ASEAN Tourism. Retrieved 7 October 2019.
  5. ^ "Khmer Foods". Tourism Cambodia. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  6. ^ "Cambodian Fish Amok Recipe – an Authentic Steamed Fish Curry in the Old Style". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  7. ^ "Cambodian Food Guide: Everything You Need To Know". Intrepid Travel. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  8. ^ "Fish Amok, Cambodia's National Dish". Asia Society. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  9. ^ "Cambodian Fish Amok Recipe – an Authentic Steamed Fish Curry in the Old Style". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  10. ^ "Cambodian Food Guide: Everything You Need To Know". Intrepid Travel. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  11. ^ "Cambodian Food Guide: Everything You Need To Know". Intrepid Travel. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  12. ^ "What is Cambodian Amok?". Food Republic. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  13. ^ "Ruining Amok, The Corruption of Cambodia's National Dish". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  14. ^ "Cambodian Fish Amok Recipe – an Authentic Steamed Fish Curry in the Old Style". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  15. ^ "Ruining Amok, The Corruption of Cambodia's National Dish". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  16. ^ "Cambodian Fish Amok Recipe – an Authentic Steamed Fish Curry in the Old Style". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  17. ^ "Cambodian Food Guide: Everything You Need To Know". Intrepid Travel. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  18. ^ "Fish Amok, Cambodia's National Dish". Asia Society. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  19. ^ "What is Cambodian Amok?". Food Republic. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  20. ^ "Dining In Cambodia". ASEAN Tourism. Retrieved 7 October 2019.
  21. ^ "Ruining Amok, The Corruption of Cambodia's National Dish". Grand Tourismo. Retrieved 7 October 2019.