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Alpine skiing at the 2014 Winter Olympics – Women's downhill

The women's downhill competition of the Sochi 2014 Olympics was held at the Rosa Khutor Alpine Resort near Krasnaya Polyana, Russia, on Wednesday, 12 February.[1] The race was won by Tina Maze of Slovenia and Dominique Gisin of Switzerland, who posted the same time. Lara Gut, also of Switzerland, was a tenth of a second back and took the bronze medal.

Women's downhill
at the XXII Olympic Winter Games
Women's downhill, 2014 Winter Olympics, podium.jpg
Maze, Gisin, and Gut on the podium
VenueRosa Khutor Alpine Resort
Krasnaya Polyana, Russia
Date12 February 2014
Competitors41 from 23 nations
Winning time1:41.57
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Tina Maze  Slovenia
1st, gold medalist(s) Dominique Gisin  Switzerland
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Lara Gut  Switzerland
← 2010
2018 →
Women's Downhill
RosaKhutor2013.jpg
LocationRosa Khutor
Vertical   790 m (2,592 ft)
Top elevation1,755 m (5,758 ft)  
Base elevation   965 m (3,166 ft)
Starting gate
The course of women's downhill in Sochi

Contents

SummaryEdit

The race course was 2.713 km (1.69 mi) in length, with a vertical drop of 790 m (2,592 ft). The gold medalists had an average speed of 96.158 km/h (59.75 mph) and an average vertical descent rate of 7.778 m/s (25.52 ft/s). The temperature was above freezing at the starting gate and skies were clear.[2]

Fabienne Suter was the first out of the gate and led until Gisin surpassed her by 0.37 seconds. Immediately after Gisin, Daniela Merighetti took a provisional second position, and stayed there until Gut, skiing 18th, replaced her at 0.10 seconds behind Gisin. Maze was the 21st racer out of the gate and led at all the intervals, but finished with exactly the same time as Gisin. The best run after Maze was by Lotte Smiseth Sejersted of Norway, who finished sixth.

Lindsey Vonn, the defending Olympic champion, did not participate, and the 2010 silver and bronze medalists, Julia Mancuso and Elisabeth Görgl, finished outside the podium. It was the first time any Olympic alpine event has ended in a tie for the gold.[3][4] Maze also won the first ever gold medal of Winter Olympics for Slovenia. Both Gisin and Gut won their first Olympic medals.[5]

ResultsEdit

The race was started at 11:00.[2]

Rank Bib Name Country Time Difference
  21 Tina Maze   Slovenia 1:41.57
8 Dominique Gisin   Switzerland
  18 Lara Gut   Switzerland 1:41.67 +0.10
4 9 Daniela Merighetti   Italy 1:41.84 +0.27
5 1 Fabienne Suter   Switzerland 1:41.94 +0.37
6 26 Lotte Smiseth Sejersted   Norway 1:42.01 +0.44
7 25 Edit Miklós   Hungary 1:42.28 +0.71
8 12 Julia Mancuso   United States 1:42.56 +0.99
9 5 Nicole Hosp   Austria 1:42.62 +1.05
10 27 Ilka Štuhec   Slovenia 1:42.65 +1.08
11 7 Laurenne Ross   United States 1:42.68 +1.11
12 11 Elena Fanchini   Italy 1:42.70 +1.13
13 20 Maria Höfl-Riesch   Germany 1:42.74 +1.17
14 23 Verena Stuffer   Italy 1:42.75 +1.18
15 3 Viktoria Rebensburg   Germany 1:42.76 +1.19
16 19 Elisabeth Görgl   Austria 1:42.82 +1.25
17 10 Stacey Cook   United States 1:43.05 +1.48
18 6 Maruša Ferk   Slovenia 1:43.24 +1.67
19 35 Chemmy Alcott   Great Britain 1:43.43 +1.86
20 28 Larisa Yurkiw   Canada 1:43.46 +1.89
21 29 Klára Křížová   Czech Republic 1:43.47 +1.90
22 30 Nadia Fanchini   Italy 1:43.48 +1.91
23 13 Kajsa Kling   Sweden 1:43.69 +2.12
24 14 Cornelia Hütter   Austria 1:43.82 +2.25
25 34 Sara Hector   Sweden 1:44.23 +2.66
26 2 Jacqueline Wiles   United States 1:44.35 +2.78
27 24 Ragnhild Mowinckel   Norway 1:44.43 +2.86
28 32 Elena Yakovishina   Russia 1:44.45 +2.88
29 37 Greta Small   Australia 1:44.79 +3.22
30 31 Maria Bedareva   Russia 1:45.29 +3.72
31 42 Kristína Saalová   Slovakia 1:45.98 +4.41
32 38 Macarena Simari Birkner   Argentina 1:46.44 +4.87
33 36 Karolina Chrapek   Poland 1:46.90 +5.33
34 40 Noelle Barahona   Chile 1:49.70 +8.13
35 41 Anna Berecz   Hungary 1:50.97 +9.40
16 Tina Weirather   Liechtenstein DNS
4 Marie Marchand-Arvier   France DNF
15 Carolina Ruiz Castillo   Spain DNF
17 Marianne Kaufmann-Abderhalden   Switzerland DNF
22 Anna Fenninger   Austria DNF
33 Alexandra Coletti   Monaco DNF
39 Ania Monica Caill   Romania DNF

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Competition Schedule". SOCOG. Retrieved 21 December 2013.
  2. ^ a b Final Results
  3. ^ Mintz, Geoff (February 12, 2014). "Tie at the top means double gold for Gisin, Maze". Ski Racing. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  4. ^ CBC live broadcast, 12 February 2014
  5. ^ "Women's downhill features first shared gold medal". Guardian. 12 February 2014. Retrieved 14 February 2014.

External linksEdit

  • FIS-Ski.com – 2014 Winter Olympics – Women's Downhill