Alex Goldfarb (politician)

Alex Goldfarb (Hebrew: אלכס גולדפרב, born 1 June 1947) is a former Israeli politician.

Alex Goldfarb
Date of birth (1947-06-01) 1 June 1947 (age 72)
Place of birthSeini, Romania
Year of aliyah1963
Knessets13
Faction represented in Knesset
1992–1994Tzomet
1992–1995Yiud
1995–1996Atid

Early lifeEdit

Alexander Goldfarb was born in Seini, Romania, and emigrated to Israel in 1963. After his military service he worked as an independent building contractor and a certified electrician. Later he worked for the Israel Electric Corporation and became active in the workers union. Alongside his employment he studied business management at the Israeli College of Management.

Political careerEdit

In 1992, Goldfarb ran in the Israeli legislative elections on the Tzomet party list. In February 1994, he left the party along with Esther Salmovitz and Gonen Segev to establish Yiud.[1] The new party joined the administration of Yitzhak Rabin and Goldfarb was appointed Deputy Minister of Housing and Construction.[2] When Rabin's government needed his support in order to approve the second Oslo agreements, which were brought to the government for ratification. Goldfarb promised the necessary majority but only after he was promised a Mitsubishi and a driver, The outcome of the vote was 61 to 59.[3]

On 27 November 1995, Goldfarb and Salmovitz left Yiud to establish Atid.[1] The party did not run in the 1996 elections and Goldfarb lost his seat. He later joined the Labor Party and was later appointed to a position linked to the security industry by then-Minister of Defense, Binyamin Ben-Eliezer.

After the Knesset and government, Goldfarb established a private company. He considered a run for Mayor of Ashkelon in 2007. In 2009 he ran for Mayor of nearby Beer Tuvia. Mayor Dror Shor was reelected.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Mergers and Splits amongst Parliamentary Groups Knesset website
  2. ^ Haberman, Clyde (26 December 1994). "Rabin Bolsters Hand by Giving Posts to 2 Defecting Rightists".
  3. ^ "Payoff at a Public Level". Haaretz. 11 April 2005.

External linksEdit