Akoka Doi

Akoka Doi is a Papua New Guinean politician. He was a member of the National Parliament of Papua New Guinea from 1977 to 1992, representing the electorate of Ijivitari Open.[1][2]

Doi was a broadcast announcer with Radio Popondetta before entering politics. He was Speaker of the National Parliament and foreign minister in Paias Wingti's first government, and was a founding member of the People's Action Party. He served as Deputy Prime Minister under Rabbie Namaliu from 1988 to 1990 and 1991 to 1992. Doi succeeded Ted Diro as leader of the People's Action Party after Diro's 1991 conviction, but lost his seat at the 1992 election.[3][4][5][6][7][2] He was appointed a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George in the 1989 New Year Honours.[8] In 1990, he was awarded the New Zealand 1990 Commemoration Medal.[9]

Doi was an unsuccessful candidate for the Northern Provincial seat at the 1997 election and 2002 election.[1] Following his 2002 defeat, he announced that he would no longer contest elections himself, stating that he would "leave it to a younger breed of leaders". He remained president of the People's Action Party, but resigned in July 2004 amid controversy over MP Jamie Maxtone-Graham's attempt to cross over to the party.[2][10]

In June 2005, he called for autonomy for Papua along the same lines as that granted to Bougainville.[11] In March 2006, he was appointed as a director of Port Moresby's water and sewerage provider, Eda Ranu.[12] He was subsequently appointed chairman of the company.[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Papua New Guinea Election Results 1972 – 2012" (PDF). Development Policy Centre, Australian National University. Retrieved 21 March 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "Doi decides to dump elections". PNG Post-Courier. 8 October 2003.
  3. ^ "Akoka Doi - true blue Oro Kaivan". Weekend Courier. 10 July 2010.
  4. ^ Nelson, H. (1991). "Papua New Guinea (November 1990 - October 1991): Crises and Continuity". The Journal of Pacific History. 26 (3). JSTOR 25169099.
  5. ^ Griffin, James (1990). "Papua New Guinea Political Chronicle, October 1989-October 1990". The Journal of Pacific History. 26 (3).
  6. ^ Thakur, Ramesh (2016). The South Pacific: Problems, Issues and Prospects. Springer. ISBN 9781349125197.
  7. ^ "Political Review - Melanesia (Spring/Fall 1989)" (PDF). The Contemporary Pacific. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  8. ^ "No. 51584". The London Gazette (7th supplement). 31 December 1988. p. 47.
  9. ^ Taylor, Alister; Coddington, Deborah (1994). Honoured by the Queen – New Zealand. Auckland: New Zealand Who's Who Aotearoa. p. 123. ISBN 0-908578-34-2.
  10. ^ "Doi resigns from PAP". PNG Post-Courier. 5 July 2004.
  11. ^ "Call for Papuan autonomy". PNG Post-Courier. 20 June 2005.
  12. ^ "Secretary CABINET has appointed several top bureaucrats to positions in the public service". PNG Post-Courier. 22 March 2006.
  13. ^ "Schools mark Water Day". PNG Post-Courier. 23 March 2011.
Political offices
Preceded by
Julius Chan
Deputy Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea
1988–1990
Succeeded by
Ted Diro
Preceded by
Ted Diro
Deputy Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea
1991–1992
Succeeded by
Julius Chan
National Parliament of Papua New Guinea
Preceded by
Brown Sinamoi
Speaker of the National Parliament of Papua New Guinea
1987
Succeeded by
Dennis Young