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Akira Mikazuki (三ヶ月 章, Mikazuki Akira, 1921 - 14 November 2010)[1][2] was a former justice minister of Japan and Professor Emeritus of Tokyo University.[3] He was a leading figure in civil procedure scholarship.[4][5]

Akira Mikazuki
Minister of Justice
In office
9 August 1993 – 28 April 1994
Prime MinisterHosokawa Morihiro
Preceded byMasaharu Gotoda
Succeeded byShigeto Nagano
Personal details
Born1921
Died14 November 2010 (aged 88–89)
Political partyNon-affiliated

Contents

CareerEdit

Mikazuki was an attorney and law professor.[6] He was a member of the Arbitration Law Study Group who drafted the arbitration law in 1989.[7]

He was appointed justice minister under the non-Liberal Democratic Party Hosokawa Morihiro cabinet, although he was not a politician.[8][9] He replaced Masaharu Gotoda as justice minister.[10] He was in office from 9 August 1993 to 28 April 1994.[11][12] His successor was Shigeto Nagano.[10]

Mikazuki reported that anyone who had plans to abolish capital punishment could not accept an appointment as justice minister.[6] He approved executions for four death row inmates and believed in the deterrent effect of capital punishment.[13] Four executions were carried out during his term in Autumn 1993.[14]

Mikazuki was also one of the Japanese politicians who fervently denied the perpetration of the massacre of Nanking by the Japanese Imperial Military during World War II.

AwardsEdit

Mikazuki received the Order of Culture award in Tokyo on 7 November 2007.[15]

DeathEdit

Mikazuki died on 14 November 2010.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Shiratori, Rei (1996). "Description of Japanese Politics in1995". European Journal of Political Research. 30. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Obituary Notice". The Japan Academy. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  3. ^ "Lord Mustill Lectures in Japan" (Newsletter). The Japan Commercial Arbitration Association. February 1997.
  4. ^ Daniel H. Foote (2007). Law in Japan: A Turning Point. University of Washington Press. p. 92. ISBN 978-0-295-98731-6. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  5. ^ Zentaro Kitagawa; Karl Riesenhuber (1 January 2007). The Identity of German and Japanese Civil Law in Comparative Perspectives. Walter de Gruyter. p. 95. ISBN 978-3-11-091915-8. Retrieved 8 December 2013.
  6. ^ a b P. Schmidt (2002). Capital Punishment in Japan. BRILL. p. 68. ISBN 978-90-04-12421-9. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  7. ^ Yasunobu Sato (2001). Commercial Dispute Processing and Japan. Kluwer Law International. p. 386. ISBN 978-90-411-1668-0. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  8. ^ Tomohito Shinoda (2000). Leading Japan: The Role of the Prime Minister. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 84. ISBN 978-0-275-96994-3. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  9. ^ McCarthy, Terry (10 August 1993). "Hosokawa plays safe with cabinet". The Independent. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  10. ^ a b "Justice Ministers of Japan". Rulers. Retrieved 5 January 2013.
  11. ^ "Cabinet". Kolombus. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  12. ^ Henrik Schmiegelow (2006). "Why Legal Transformation Assistance from Germany and Japan to Former East-Bloc Countries ?" (PDF). Journal of Japan Law (22). Retrieved 8 December 2013.
  13. ^ Mika, Obara. "Capital Punishment in Japan: Unpacking Key Actors at the Governmental Level" (PDF). International Christian University. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  14. ^ Domikova-Hashimoto, Dana (1996). "Japan and capital punishment" (PDF). Human Affairs. 6 (1): 77–93. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  15. ^ "Kyogen actor, four others chosen for culture awards". The Japan Times. Kyodo News. 28 October 2007. Retrieved 3 January 2013.