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Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty

The Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty or formally the Office of the Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty sometimes called the Department of the Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty was a member of the Board of Admiralty first from 1882 to 1885 and then again from 1912 to 1919 who was mainly responsible for administration of contracts for matériel for the Fleet, supervision of the contracts and purchase department and general organisation of dockyards within the Admiralty.

Office of the Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
Seal of H.M. Government
Department of the Admiralty
Member ofBoard of Admiralty
Reports toFirst lord of the Admiralty
NominatorFirst lord of the Admiralty
AppointerPrime Minister
Subject to formal approval by the King-in-Council
Term lengthNot fixed (typically 1–3 years)
Inaugural holderGeorge Wightwick Rendel
Formation1882-1885, 1912-1919

Contents

HistoryEdit

On 14 April 1882, George W. Rendel, a renowned civil engineer working for both the Elswick Ordnance Company and the Armstrong Whitworth Shipbuilding Company, was appointed as an Additional Civil Lord on the Board of Admiralty. The post was sometimes styled Extra-Professional Civil Lord [1] or Second Civil Lord [2] during the periods in question. The post holder was usually held by a person who was neither a naval officer or a politician it existed briefly until 1885 before being abolished. In 1912 the post was re-established and usually held by one person. In 1917 due to the increasing workload of the Civil Lord of the Admiralty extra civil lords were added however they were restyled as Second Civil Lord,[3] Third Civil Lord and Fourth Civil Lord until 1919 when the office was once again abolished.

ResponsibilitiesEdit

As of April 1882, the holder's responsibilities included (duties shared with Controller of the Navy):[4]

  1. Dockyards.
  2. Steam Reserves.—as regard Ships.
  3. Shipbuilding.
  4. Constructor's Department.
  5. Store Department.
  6. Dock-yard Craft.
  7. Inventions and Experiments in Ships and Steam.
  8. Gunnery as relates to Materiel.
  9. Promotions and transfers of Professional Officers and Workmen in the Dockyards.

Additional as of September 1912.[5]

  1. Contracts for Matériel for the Fleet (including Ships and their Machinery, Armour, Naval Ordnance and Gun Mountings, Aeroplanes and Airships), Works, Yard Machinery, and Stores of all descriptions. Contract arrangements in connection with the disposal, salvage, or loan of vessels or stores.
  2. Superintendence of the Contract and Purchase Department.

NOTE.—Tenders for Ship's Hulls and Propelling Machinery, Armour, and important Gun and Air-craft Orders, will also be marked to the Third Sea Lord. General organisation of Dockyards, including provision of Labour and Plant, and all business questions in connection with the building and repair of ships and their machinery, whether in the Dockyards or in Private Yards.

Additional as of August 1916.[6]

  1. Contracts for Matériel for the Fleet (including Ships and their Machinery, Armour, Naval Ordnance and Gun Mountings, Aeroplanes and Airships), Works, Yard Machinery, and Stores of all descriptions. Contract arrangements in connection with the disposal, salvage, or loan of vessels or stores. Superintendence of the Contract and Purchase Department.
  2. General organisation of Dockyards, including provision of Labour and Plant, and all business questions in connection with the building and repair of ships and their machinery, whether in the Dockyards or in Private Yards.

NOTE.—Important questions relating to repair of ships and questions of general administration which may affect progress on ships building or under repair will be marked also to the Third Sea Lord. NOTE.—Tenders for Ship's Hulls and Propelling Machinery, Armour, and important Gun and Aircraft Orders, will also be marked to the Third Sea Lord.

Additional Civil Lords of the AdmiraltyEdit

Included:

Second Civil LordEdit

Third Civil LordEdit

Fourth Civil LordEdit

Departments under the additional civil lordEdit

ReferencesEdit

Citations

  1. ^ Spear, W. F. (1912). Rendel, George Wightwick: Biography, Supplement, Orginally [sic?] from Men of the Time, 1899; Minutes of Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. cli. 421; Trans. Inst. Naval Arch. xlv. 332; Engineering, 17 Oct. 1902; information from Lord Rendel. Dictionary of National Biography.
  2. ^ Jellicoe, Earl John Rushworth Jellicoe (1921). The Crisis of the Naval War. Library of Alexandria. p. Ch.3. ISBN 9781465507914.
  3. ^ Marder, Arthur J. (2014). From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow: Volume IV 1917, Year of Crisis. Seaforth Publishing. p. 220. ISBN 9781848322011.
  4. ^ Archives, The National. ""Distribution of Business" in docket "Distribution of Business: Board of Admiralty" dated 24 April, 1882. The National Archives. ADM 1/6330". discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk. National Archives, 24 April 1882, ADM 1/6330. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  5. ^ Greene, Sir William Graham (Secretary of the Admiralty). ""The Board of Admiralty. Distribution of Business."". collections.rmg.co.uk. Copy in Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum. GEE/2. pp. 4-5. 14 February 1917. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  6. ^ Greene, Sir William Graham (Secretary of the Admiralty). ""The Board of Admiralty. Distribution of Business."". collections.rmg.co.uk. Copy in Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum. GEE/2. pp. 4-5. 14 February 1917. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  7. ^ Blakeley, Fred M. Walker ; foreword by Trevor (2010). Ships & shipbuilders : pioneers of design and construction. Barnsley: Seaforth, published in association with the Royal Institution of Naval Architects. p. 147. ISBN 9781848320727.
  8. ^ Laviers, Eleanor; Mckillop-Mash, Charlotte. "Papers of Francis John Stephens Hopwood, Baron Southborough". www.bodley.ox.ac.uk. Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, 2007. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  9. ^ "Supplement to the London Gazette" (PDF). thegazette.co.uk. London Gazette, 5 June 1920, p,6314. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  10. ^ Museum, Durham Mining. "Durham Mining Museum - Arthur Francis Pease, Sir, Bart". dmm.org.uk. Durham Mining Museum, 20 October 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2017.
  11. ^ Government, H.M. (January 1919). "Admiralty: Board of Admiralty". The Navy List: corrected to 18 December 1918. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 1812.
  12. ^ Kent, Marian (2005). The Great Powers and the End of the Ottoman Empire. Routledge. p. 225. ISBN 9781135778002.
  13. ^ Government, H.M. (January 1919). "Admiralty: Board of Admiralty". The Navy List: corrected to 18 December 1918. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 1812.
  14. ^ Government, H.M. (January 1919). "Admiralty: Board of Admiralty". The Navy List: corrected to 18 December 1918. H.M. Stationery Office. p. 1812.

Sources

  • Archives, National (1882), Distribution of Business in docket Distribution of Business: Board of Admiralty. ADM 1/6330. UK.
  • Blakeley, Fred M. Walker ; foreword by Trevor (2010). Ships & shipbuilders : pioneers of design and construction. Barnsley: Seaforth, published in association with the Royal Institution of Naval Architects. ISBN 9781848320727.
  • Greene, Sir William Graham (Secretary of the Admiralty), (1917) "The Board of Admiralty. Distribution of Business". Copy in Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum, GEE/2. UK.
  • Government, H.M. (January 1919). Admiralty: Board of Admiralty. The Navy List: corrected to 18 December 1918. London. H.M. Stationery Office. England.
  • Jellicoe, Earl John Rushworth Jellicoe (1921). The Crisis of the Naval War. Library of Alexandria. ISBN 9781465507914.
  • Marder, Arthur J. (2014). From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow: Volume IV 1917, Year of Crisis. Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 9781848322011.
  • Laviers, Eleanor; Mckillop-Mash, Charlotte. Papers of Francis John Stephens Hopwood, Baron Southborough. Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, 2007. www.bodley.ox.ac.uk
  • Rodger. N.A.M. (1979). The Admiralty (offices of state). T. Dalton. Lavenham. ISBN 978-0900963940.
  • Smith, Gordon (2014). British Admiralty Part 2 - Changes in Admiralty Departments, 1913-1920, http://www.naval-history.net/.

AttributionEdit

Primary source for this article is by Harley Simon, Lovell Tony, (2016), Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty (Royal Navy), dreadnoughtproject.org, http://www.dreadnoughtproject.org.

External linksEdit