Addison White (May 1, 1824 – February 4, 1909) was an American politician who served the state of Kentucky in the United States House of Representatives between 1851 and 1853 and as a colonel in the army of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War.

Addison White
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 6th district
In office
1851–1853
Preceded byDaniel Breck
Succeeded byJohn M. Elliott
Personal details
BornMay 1, 1824
Abingdon, Virginia
DiedFebruary 4, 1909(1909-02-04) (aged 84)
Huntsville, Alabama
Resting placeMaple Hill Cemetery
NationalityAmerican
Political partyWhig
RelativesJohn White
Alma materPrinceton College
ProfessionPolitician, Soldier, Businessman
Military service
Allegiance Confederate States of America
Branch/service Confederate States Army
Years of service1861 - 1865
RankColonel

BiographyEdit

Addison White was born in Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia on May 1, 1824 to Colonel James White. The Whites were considered the "First Family" of Clay County, Kentucky. Addison's father was among the richest men in America due to his myriad business interests including salt mining which lead to his nickname "The King of Salt."

He graduated from Princeton College in 1844. In 1850, he was elected as a Whig to the U.S. House of Representatives, serving one term. Addison's 1st cousin, John White preceded his service and his nephew John D. White followed him, also representing Kentucky.

During the Civil War, Addison served as a colonel in the Confederate Army.

After the war, he moved to Huntsville, Alabama and became a successful businessman and died there on February 4, 1909. He was buried in Maple Hill Cemetery in Huntsville.

His grandchildren and great-grandchildren include:

ReferencesEdit

  • United States Congress. "Addison White (id: W000350)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved on 2009-02-26
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Daniel Breck
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 6th congressional district

1851 - 1853
Succeeded by
John M. Elliott