Adam Boyd (politician)

Adam Boyd (March 21, 1746 – August 15, 1835) was a United States Representative from New Jersey. He was a slaveholder.[1]

Early life and careerEdit

Born in Mendham, he moved to Bergen County and to Hackensack a few years later. He was a member of the Bergen County board of freeholders and justices in 1773, 1784, 1791, 1794, and 1798, and was sheriff of Bergen County from 1778 to 1781 and again in 1789. Boyd was a member of the New Jersey General Assembly in 1782, 1783, 1787, 1794, and 1795, and was judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Bergen County from 1803 to 1805.

CongressEdit

Boyd was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Eighth Congress, serving from March 4, 1803, to March 3, 1805, and was elected to the Tenth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Ezra Darby. He was reelected to the Eleventh and Twelfth Congresses and served from March 8, 1808, to March 3, 1813. He was again judge of the court of common pleas from 1813 to 1833.

DeathEdit

Boyd died in Hackensack, and was interred there in the First Reformed Dutch Church, Hackensack.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Weil, Julie Zauzmer; Blanco, Adrian; Dominguez, Leo (20 January 2022). "More than 1,700 congressmen once enslaved Black people. This is who they were, and how they shaped the nation". Washington Post. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  2. ^ Adam Boyd, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 22, 2007.

External linksEdit

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's at-large congressional district

March 4, 1803 – March 3, 1805
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's at-large congressional district

March 8, 1808 – March 3, 1813
Succeeded by