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An acid house party was a type of illegal party typically staged in warehouses in 1987–1989. Parties played Acid House and Acid Techno music, electronic music genres with a distinct sound from the use of the Roland TB-303 Synthesizer.[1] The origin of the term acid house party is disputed coming either from the 1987 song “Acid Trax” by Phuture, or the consumption of MDMA and LSD that were common at the parties.[1] The prevalence of drug use at these parties was in contrast to Thatcherism at the time, sparking moral panic. In response, the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed the Entertainments (Increased Penalties) Act of 1990 which brought the decline of acid house parties.[2] As a result, the time period is often referred to as the Second Summer of Love. Eventually acid house parties morphed into the rave scene.[3]

In the United Kingdom, some of the most famous party promoters included Genesis'88, Sunrise, and Energy[4]. London dance club Shoom was known for playing Acid House as early as December 1987, which is said to have started the phenomenon in the city.[5]

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Class of 88 - The True Acid House Experience, Wayne Anthony, Virgin. The book may also be downloaded from the - author's e-group.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "View of Along the Lines of the Roland TB-303: Three Perversions of Acid Techno | Dancecult: Journal of Electronic Dance Music Culture". dj.dancecult.net. Retrieved 2019-07-28.
  2. ^ Hill, Andrew (2003-12-01). "Acid house and Thatcherism: Contesting spaces in late 1980s Britain". Space and Polity. 7 (3): 219–232. doi:10.1080/1356257032000169695. ISSN 1356-2576.
  3. ^ Class of 88 - The True Acid House Experience, Wayne Anthony, Virgin. The book may also be downloaded from the - author's e-group.
  4. ^ How property owners can neutralise Acid House parties. By: Daglish, James, EG: Estates Gazette, 00141240, 8/11/2018, Issue 1832
  5. ^ Matos, Michaelangelo; Matos, Michaelangelo (2017-12-12). "Shoom: An Oral History of the London Club That Kicked Off Rave Culture". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2019-07-28.

External linksEdit