341 California

California (minor planet designation: 341 California) is an asteroid belonging to the Flora family in the Main Belt. It was discovered by Max Wolf on 25 September 1892 in Heidelberg, and is named for the U.S. state of California.[5] This object is orbiting the Sun at a distance of 2.20 AU with a period of 3.26 yr and an eccentricity (ovalness) of 0.19. The orbital plane is inclined at an angle of 5.7° to the plane of the ecliptic.[1]

341 California
000341-asteroid shape model (341) California.png
Shape model of California
Discovery
Discovered byMax Wolf
Discovery siteHeidelberg Obs.
Discovery date25 September 1892
Designations
(341) California
Named after
California
1892 J; 1979 FY2
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc113.45 yr (41,439 d)
Aphelion2.62698 AU (392.991 Gm)
Perihelion1.77187 AU (265.068 Gm)
2.19943 AU (329.030 Gm)
Eccentricity0.19439
3.26 yr (1,191.4 d)
15.6325°
0° 18m 7.783s / day
Inclination5.66900°
29.0469°
293.875°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions14.67±0.9 km[1]
15 km [2]
Mean density
~2.7 g/cm3[3]
317.88 h (13.25 d)
0.4950±0.064[1]
0.495 [2]
S[4]
Flora family
10.55

The very slow rotation rate of this asteroid favors collecting photometric data for an extended period in order to measure the period. Data collected from June to December of 2016 was used to produce a light curve showing a rotation period of 317.88±0.06 h with a brightness variation of 0.9 in magnitude. It is tumbling with a period of 250±2 h.[6] It has an unusually high albedo.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "341 California (1892 J)". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 11 May 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey". Planetary Data System. Planetary Science Institute. 23 June 2006. Archived 2006-06-23 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Krasinsky, G. A.; et al. (2002). "Hidden Mass in the Asteroid Belt". Icarus. 158: 98. Bibcode:2002Icar..158...98K. doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6837.
  4. ^ PDS spectral class data
  5. ^ Peebles, Curtis (2016), Asteroids: a History, Smithsonian, p. 159, ISBN 9781944466046
  6. ^ Pilcher, Frederick; Franco, Lorenzo; Pravec, Petr (April 2017), "319 Leona and 341 California - Two Very Slowly Rotating Asteroids", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers, 44 (2): 87–90, Bibcode:2017MPBu...44...87P.

External linksEdit