Russia (minor planet designation: 232 Russia) is a large Main belt asteroid. It is classified as a C-type asteroid and is probably composed of primitive carbonaceous material. It was discovered by Johann Palisa on 31 January 1883 in Vienna, who named it after the country of Russia.

232 Russia
Discovery
Discovered byJohann Palisa
Discovery date31 January 1883
Designations
(232) Russia
Named after
Russia
A883 BA, 1921 UA
1929 QA, 1954 SV
1970 SN1
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc102.35 yr (37382 d)
Aphelion2.9986 AU (448.58 Gm)
Perihelion2.1069 AU (315.19 Gm)
2.5527 AU (381.88 Gm)
Eccentricity0.17465
4.08 yr (1489.7 d)
18.65 km/s
213.685°
0° 14m 29.976s / day
Inclination6.0659°
152.250°
52.163°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions53.28±1.1 km
21.905 h (0.9127 d)
0.0494±0.002
C
10.25

Photometric observations of this asteroid collected during 2007 show a rotation period of 21.8 ± 0.2 hours with a brightness variation of 0.2 ± 0.02 magnitude.[2] A follow up study during 2014 discovered that the rotation period varied depending on the phase angle of observation. The measured rotation varied from 22.016 ± 0.004 hours at a phase angle of 21.5 degrees to 17.0, to 21.904 ± 0.002 hours at phase angles between 5.2 degrees and 9.6 degrees. The reason for this variation has to do with the shape of the asteroid.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "232 Russia". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  2. ^ Torno, Steven; Lemke Oliver, Robert; Ditteon, Richard (June 2008), "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Oakley Southern Sky Observatory - October 2007", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 35 (2): 54–55, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...54T.
  3. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (April 2013), "Another Asteroid with a Changing Lightcurve: 232 Russia", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 41 (4): 205, Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..205P.

External linksEdit