2017 Irish budget

The 2017 Irish budget was the Irish Government budget for the 2017 fiscal year, which was presented to Dáil Éireann on 11 October 2016. Michael Noonan announced the tax measures and Paschal Donohoe the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform announced the spending adjustments.[1][2][3]

2017 (2017) Irish budget
Submitted byMichael Noonan
Paschal Donohoe
Presented11 October 2016
Parliament32nd Dáil
PartyFine Gael
Websitebudget.gov.ie/Budgets/2017/2017.aspx
‹ 2016
2018 ›

SummaryEdit

[4][5][6][7]

  • Social welfare payments and the State pension are to increase by €5 per week commencing from the start of March.
  • 50 cent added to the price of a packet of 20 cigarettes. The excise on alcohol and fuel is being left unchanged.
  • Three USC brackets will be reduced by half a percent.
  • A tax rebate of up to €20,000 in a new help-to-buy scheme for first-time buyers. This goes toward a deposit for a new home.
  • The rent-a-room relief is to be increased. With a higher tax ceiling of €14,000 (from €12,000), the government hopes to encourage homeowners to rent out a vacant room.
  • The Home Renovation Incentive Scheme is being extended by two years to the end of 2018 to help those not buying new homes.
  • The home carers’ credit is to increase by €100 to bring it up to €1,100.
  • The Government is reducing the €25 cap on prescription charges for over-70s to €20 from 1 March.
  • Social welfare recipients will be entitled to a Christmas bonus equal to 85 per cent of their weekly payment (up from 75 per cent in 2015).
  • 800 new gardaí to be recruited in 2017.
  • Funding for the Department of Defence is to increase by €16 million.
  • €1.2bn in funding for housing, with 47,000 new social housing units by 2021.
  • Medical card for all children who receive domiciliary care allowance.
  • Intention to introduce tax on sugar-sweetened drinks in April 2018 after public consultation.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Who is Ireland's 'squeezed middle' and why is Budget 2017 all about pleasing them?". The Journal. 10 October 2016. Retrieved 10 October 2016.
  2. ^ "Here's everything you need to know to stay on top of Budget 2017". The Journal. 11 October 2016. Retrieved 11 October 2016.
  3. ^ "'A pint for everyone': How the front pages are covering the Budget". Journal. 12 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  4. ^ "Budget 2017: Main points". Irish Times. 12 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  5. ^ "Budget 2017: The key points". RTE News. 12 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  6. ^ "Childcare, €300m tax cuts, welfare hikes - your guide to Budget 2017". Irish Independent. 12 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  7. ^ "Budget 2017: Everything you need to know". Irish Examiner. 12 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.

External linksEdit

Preceded by Budget of the Government of Ireland
Delivered on 11 October 2016
Succeeded by