Open main menu

2016 Collegiate Rugby Championship

The 2016 Collegiate Rugby Championship is a college rugby sevens tournament played June 4–5 at Talen Energy Stadium in Chester, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia.[1] It is the seventh annual Collegiate Rugby Championship, and the sixth consecutive year that the tournament will be at Talen Energy Stadium (formerly known as PPL Park). The event was broadcast on NBC and NBCSN.[2] Commentators were Todd Harris and Brian Hightower. California won the championship, defeating UCLA 31–7 in an all-Pac-12 final. Attendance for the two-day event was 27,224.[3]

2016 Collegiate Rugby Championship
Tournament details
CountriesUnited States
Tournament format(s)Round-robin and Knockout
DateJune 4–5, 2016
Tournament statistics
Teams24
Final
VenueTalen Energy Stadium,
Chester, Pennsylvania
ChampionsCalifornia
Runners-upUCLA
← 2015 (Previous)
(Next) 2017 →

Pool stageEdit

  Team qualified for the Cup Championship

Pool AEdit

Team Pld W D L PF PA +/- Pts
California 3 3 0 0 96 12 +84 9
Arkansas State 3 2 0 1 76 24 +57 7
Maryland 3 1 0 2 22 69 –52 5
Tennessee 3 0 0 3 14 103 –89 3
Winner Score Loser
Arkansas State 24–0 Maryland
California 41–0 Tennessee
Arkansas State 40–0 Tennessee
California 29–0 Maryland
Maryland 22–14 Tennessee
California 24–12 Arkansas State

Pool BEdit

Team Pld W D L PF PA +/- Pts
Kutztown 3 3 0 0 58 34 +24 9
Indiana 3 1 0 2 46 45 +1 5
Notre Dame 3 1 0 2 43 55 –12 5
Boston College 3 1 0 2 45 58 –13 5
Winner Score Loser
Boston College 21–12 Indiana
Kutztown 19–12 Notre Dame
Indiana 22–7 Notre Dame
Kutztown 22–10 Boston College
Notre Dame 24-12 Boston College
Kutztown 17–12 Indiana

Pool CEdit

Team Pld W D L PF PA +/- Pts
Arizona 3 3 0 0 51 5 +46 9
Saint Joseph's 3 2 0 1 52 31 +21 7
Army 3 1 0 2 26 55 –29 5
Navy 3 0 0 3 22 60 –38 3
Winner Score Loser
Arizona 20–0 Army
St. Joseph's 22–12 Navy
Arizona 17–0 Navy
St. Joseph's 25–5 Army
Arizona 14–5 St. Joseph's
Army 21-10 Navy

Pool DEdit

Team Pld W D L PF PA +/- Pts
Life 3 2 0 1 68 14 +54 7
Penn State 3 2 0 1 63 41 +22 7
Virginia Tech 3 2 0 1 43 41 +2 7
Drexel 3 0 0 3 19 97 –77 3
Winner Score Loser
Life 46–0 Drexel
Penn State 29–12 Virginia Tech
Virginia Tech 7–5 Life
Penn State 27–12 Drexel
Virginia Tech 24–7 Drexel
Life 17–7 Penn State

Pool EEdit

Team Pld W D L PF PA +/- Pts
UCLA 3 3 0 0 95 7 +88 9
Wisconsin 3 2 0 1 55 43 +12 7
South Carolina 3 1 0 2 24 53 –29 5
Michigan 3 0 0 3 5 76 –71 3
Winner Score Loser
South Carolina 12–5 Michigan
UCLA 38–0 Wisconsin
Wisconsin 29–5 South Carolina
UCLA 38–0 Michigan
Wisconsin 26–0 Michigan
UCLA 19–7 South Carolina

Pool FEdit

Team Pld W D L PF PA +/- Pts
Dartmouth 3 3 0 0 57 34 +23 9
Utah 3 2 0 1 48 40 +8 7
Temple 3 1 0 2 38 50 –12 5
Clemson 3 0 0 3 33 52 –19 3
Winner Score Loser
Dartmouth 17–5 Temple
Utah 12–7 Clemson
Dartmouth 21–14 Clemson
Utah 21–14 Temple
Temple 19–12 Clemson
Dartmouth 19–15 Utah

Knockout stageEdit

BowlEdit

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
17 Army 36
24 Tennessee 0
17 Army 28
20 Clemson 7
20 Clemson 10
21 Navy 5
17 Army 10
18 Maryland 0
19 Boston College 21
22 Michigan 0
19 Boston College 12
18 Maryland 15
18 Maryland 24
23 Drexel 0

PlateEdit

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
9 Saint Joseph's 12
16 South Carolina 19
16 South Carolina 7
13 Indiana 25
12 Virginia Tech 7
13 Indiana 31
13 Indiana 7
10 Wisconsin 10
11 Utah 5
14 Notre Dame 0
11 Utah 12
10 Wisconsin 17
10 Wisconsin 33
15 Temple 0

CupEdit

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
1 UCLA 19
8 Penn State 12
1 UCLA 14
4 Kutztown 12
4 Kutztown 19
5 Dartmouth 12
1 UCLA 7
2 California 31
3 Arizona 17
6 Life 12
3 Arizona 5
2 California 38
2 California 24
7 Arkansas State 14

PlayersEdit

Most tries
Rank Player (school) Tries
1 Niall Barry (UCLA) 6
2 Seb Sharpe (UCLA) 5
2 Zinzan Elan-Puttick (Ark. St.) 5
2 Tyler Sousley (Arizona) 5
2 Jake Syndergaard (Wisconsin) 5

Source:[4][5]

Dream TeamEdit

  1. Jesse Milne (California) — Tournament MVP
  2. Russell Webb (California)
  3. Niall Barry (UCLA)
  4. Seb Sharpe (UCLA)
  5. Tyler Sousley (Arizona)
  6. Wes Hartmann (Kutztown)
  7. Zinzan Elan-Puttick (Arkansas State)
  8. Cody Melphy (Life)
  9. Jack Braun (Dartmouth)
  10. Jake Syndergaard (Wisconsin)
  11. Chad Gough (Utah)
  12. Evan Towle (Virginia Tech)

Source:[6]

ReferencesEdit