2016–17 World Rugby Women's Sevens Series

The 2016–17 World Rugby Women's Sevens Series was the fifth edition of the World Rugby Women's Sevens Series (formerly the IRB Women's Sevens World Series), an annual series of tournaments organised by World Rugby for women's national teams in rugby sevens.

World Rugby
Women's Sevens Series V
Hosts United Arab Emirates
 Australia
 United States
 Japan
 Canada
 France
Date1 Dec 2016 – 25 June 2017
Final positions
Champions New Zealand
Runners-up Australia
Third Canada

The competitionEdit

There were six tournament events in 2016–17.[1][2] Twelve teams competed at each event; eleven being "core" teams, with a twelfth team invited to participate in particular events (similar to previous women's series as well as the men's counterpart). At each event teams compete for gold, silver and bronze medals with the third place match now renamed as the Bronze match while lower ranked teams will contest a new Challenge Trophy competition.[3] The overall winner of the series was determined by points gained from the standings across all events in the season.[4]

TeamsEdit

Eleven "core teams" qualified to participate in all series events for the 2016–17 series, the same number as the previous season. The top nine finishers in the previous series were granted core team status:[5]

Two additional core teams qualified for the 2016–17 series:[5]

The twelfth team at each tournament in the 2016–17 series was invited at the discretion of World Rugby.[5]

EventsEdit

2016–17 Itinerary
Leg Venue (Area) Dates Winner
Dubai The Sevens, Dubai 1–2 December 2016   New Zealand
Australia Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney 3–4 February 2017   Canada
United States Sam Boyd Stadium, Las Vegas 3–5 March 2017   New Zealand
Japan Mikuni World Stadium Kitakyushu, Kitakyushu 22–23 April 2017

  New Zealand

Canada Westhills Stadium, Langford, British Columbia 27–28 May 2017   New Zealand
France Stade Gabriel Montpied, Clermont-Ferrand 24–25 June 2017   New Zealand

StandingsEdit

Final standings for the 2016–17 series:

2016–17 World Rugby Women's Sevens
Series V
Pos
Event 
Team
 
Dubai
 
Sydney
 
Las Vegas
 
Kitakyushu
 
Langford
 
Clermont
Points
total
1   New Zealand 20 16 20 20 20 20 116
2   Australia 18 14 18 16 16 18 100
3   Canada 10 20 16 18 18 16 98
4   Fiji 12 12 12 14 4 12 66
5   Russia 16 8 10 12 12 8 66
6   United States 2 18 14 8 10 10 62
7   France 8 10 8 6 14 14 60
8   England 14 3 3 10 6 1 37
9   Ireland 4 6 6 4 8 6 34
10   Spain 3 2 4 3 3 4 19
11   Brazil 1 4 2 2 2 2 13
12   South Africa 6 6
13   Japan 1 3 4
14   Papua New Guinea 1 1
15   Argentina 1 1
16   Netherlands 1 1

Source: World Rugby (archived)

Legend
Qualification for 2017–18 World Sevens Series
Green Qualified as a core team for Series VI
No colour The remainder do not directly qualify for Series VI
Qualification for 2018 Rugby World Cup Sevens
Already confirmed for 2018 (host country United States and 2013 semifinalists)
Qualified as one of the four highest placed teams from Series V that have not already qualified.[6]

TournamentsEdit

DubaiEdit

In the first event of the series, New Zealand took revenge for their Olympic final loss by defeating Australia in the Cup final. The three medalists from the Olympic Games were unbeaten in the pool stage of the competition.[7] In the quarter finals stage, Russia put behind their failure to qualify for the Olympics earlier in the year by eliminating Rio bronze medalists Canada. The final was a repeat of the Olympic final with Australia battling throughout the final but tries to Portia Woodman and Rebekah Cordero-Tufuga gave New Zealand the gold medal. The 5th place final was won by Fiji, while Ireland won the first Challenge Trophy which replaced the Bowl competition.[8]

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup   New Zealand 17–5   Australia   Russia (Bronze)
  England
5th place   Fiji 17–14   Canada   France (7th)
  South Africa
Challenge Trophy   Ireland 14–12   Spain   United States (11th)
  Brazil

SydneyEdit

Australia was included on the women's world circuit for the first time at the 2017 Sydney Women's Sevens.[9] On the opening day of competition, England was the only core team not to make the Cup quarterfinals with only a win against Spain from their three pool matches.[10] The upset of the tournament came from the United States as they defeated New Zealand in the semifinal stage. Canada won the Cup final over their North American neighbours, however, by 21–17. Fiji won the 5th place final for the second time in a row and Brazil won the Challenge Trophy.[11]

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup   Canada 21–17   United States   New Zealand (Bronze)
  Australia
5th place   Fiji 31–12   France   Russia (7th)
  Ireland
Challenge Trophy   Brazil 17–12   England   Spain (11th)
  Papua New Guinea

Las VegasEdit

After a month break, the tour headed to the United States for the first USA Women's Sevens tournament to be held in Las Vegas. On the opening day of competition, Canada and New Zealand each recorded a three from three in the pool stage. Also during the day Ghislaine Landry converting Moleschi's try got her level with Portia Woodman as the all-time leading point scorer in the series with 665.[12] New Zealand took the Cup on the second day, defeating Australia 28-5 and didn't look troubled throughout the final match. In the bronze medal match, Canada maintained their edge over the hosts winning by 31–7.[13] in the minor play-offs, Fiji won the 5th place final again while Spain took the Challenge Trophy.

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup   New Zealand 28–5   Australia   Canada (Bronze)
  United States
5th place   Fiji 19–17   Russia   France (7th)
  Ireland
Challenge Trophy   Spain 10–0   England   Brazil (11th)
  Argentina

KitakyushuEdit

The series headed off to Japan for the first ever Japan Women's Sevens. The opening day would see the top three at the time in New Zealand, Australia and Canada winning all three of their matches in the group stage.[14] The second day would see the top three qualify through to the cup semi-finals with Fiji being the fourth team as they made it through to the Cup Semi-Finals for the first time since 2014. But New Zealand would take the Cup title for the third tournament of the season as they defeated Canada in the final in a cup final meeting for the first time since Atlanta 2014. Russia would finish in fifth place while Ireland took out the Challenge after defeating Spain.[15]

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup   New Zealand 17–14   Canada   Australia (Bronze)
  Fiji
5th place   Russia 31–0   England   United States (7th)
  France
Challenge Trophy   Ireland 26–7   Spain   Brazil (11th)
  Japan

LangfordEdit

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup   New Zealand 17–7   Canada   Australia (Bronze)
  France
5th place   Russia 26–21   United States   Ireland (7th)
  England
Challenge Trophy   Fiji 31–7   Spain   Brazil (11th)
  Netherlands

Clermont-FerrandEdit

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup   New Zealand 22–7   Australia   Canada (Bronze)
  France
5th place   Fiji 24–19   United States   Russia (7th)
  Ireland
Challenge Trophy   Spain 15–14   Japan   Brazil (11th)
  England

Placings summaryEdit

Tallies of top four tournament placings during the 2016–17 series, by team (updated to Canada):

Team   Gold   Silver   Bronze Fourth Total
  New Zealand 5 - 1 - 6
  Canada 1 2 2 - 5
  Australia - 3 2 1 6
  United States - 1 - 1 2
  Russia - - 1 - 1
  France - - - 2 2
  England - - - 1 1
  Fiji - - - 1 1
Totals 6 6 6 6 24

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series to kick-off in Dubai". Seven Days. 28 August 2016. Archived from the original on 28 August 2016. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  2. ^ "Las Vegas to host Women's Sevens Series round in 2017". World Rugby. 29 November 2016. Archived from the original on 29 November 2016.
  3. ^ "Men's and women's sevens winners to strike gold". World Rugby.org. 3 October 2016.
  4. ^ "Women's Sevens Series tournament rules". World Rugby. 2016. Archived from the original on 30 May 2016. Retrieved 30 May 2016.
  5. ^ a b c "Series Qualifying". World Rugby. 2016. Archived from the original on 25 November 2016.
  6. ^ Rugby World Cup Sevens 2018 qualification process. World Rugby.
  7. ^ "Olympic medallists unbeaten after day one in Dubai". 1 December 2016. Retrieved 3 December 2016.
  8. ^ "New Zealand claim top prize in Dubai". 2 December 2016. Retrieved 3 December 2016.
  9. ^ "Walsh calls on Sevens to keep breaking new ground". 10 January 2017. Retrieved 4 February 2017.
  10. ^ "Hosts unbeaten on day one in Sydney". 3 February 2017. Retrieved 4 February 2017.
  11. ^ "Canada lift trophy on day of shocks in Sydney". 4 February 2017. Retrieved 5 February 2017.
  12. ^ "Landry equals all-time record as Canada cruise into last eight". 4 March 2017. Retrieved 5 March 2017.
  13. ^ "New Zealand take gold in USA Sevens". 5 March 2017. Retrieved 5 March 2017.
  14. ^ "Top three in series finish day unbeaten". 22 April 2017. Retrieved 24 June 2017.
  15. ^ "New Zealand leave it late to claim gold in Japan". 23 April 2017. Retrieved 24 June 2017.