Open main menu

Wikipedia β

2014 YB35 (also written 2014 YB35) is a near-Earth asteroid discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on 27 December 2014. It is approximately 520 metres (1,710 ft) in diameter.[1]

2014 YB35
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Catalina Sky Survey
Discovery date 27 December 2014
Designations
MPC designation 2014 YB35
Apollo NEO[2]
PHA[1]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 2
Observation arc 162 days
Aphelion 2.783890 AU (416.4640 Gm)
Perihelion 0.969497 AU (145.0347 Gm)
1.876694 AU (280.7494 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.483401
2.57 yr (939.05 d)
109.6743°
0° 23m 0.119s / day
Inclination 12.64370°
3.768323°
188.5974°
Earth MOID 0.0230704 AU (3.45128 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.18168 AU (326.375 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 520 m (1,710 ft)[1]
3.277 h (0.1365 d)
3.277 hours
19.0[1][2]

It passed by Earth on 27 March 2015 at 06:21 UTC at a distance of 4,473,807 ± 155 km (2,779,895 ± 96 mi), or 11.7 lunar distances, and a relative speed of 10.16 km/s (6.31 mi/s).[2] The Goldstone Observatory was scheduled to observe this object on 20 March 2015, at which time it was expected they could obtain coarse radar images and continuous wave spectra, which may help determine the asteroid's composition.[1] These observations showed a small companion less than 150 meters across orbiting the asteroid, with an unknown orbit.[3][4]

2014 YB35's next encounter with Earth will be in 2033, at a distance of approximately 3,330,000 km (2,070,000 mi).[2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Benner, Lance A. M. (4 March 2015). "Goldstone Radar Observations Planning: 2002 FG7 and 2014 YB35". NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 13 March 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2014 YB35". NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 4 April 2016. 
  3. ^ "Binary and ternary near-earth asteroids". NASA. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  4. ^ Green, Daniel W. E. (25 July 2015). "Electronic Telegram No. 4121: 2014 YB_35". Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. Retrieved 1 January 2016. 

External linksEdit