2013 CELAC summit

The I CELAC summit or 2013 CELAC summit was the first ordinary heads of state summit of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States. It was held on 27 and 28 January 2013 in Santiago, Chile.

I CELAC Summit
Host country Chile
DateJanuary 27–28, 2013 (2013-01-27 – 2013-01-28)
CitiesSantiago
Participants
Follows2011 CELAC summit
Precedes2014 CELAC summit

All CELAC member states participated except Paraguay. Following the impeachment of Fernando Lugo in 2012, Paraguay was excluded from Mercosur and Unasur meetings. While Paraguay was not officially sanctioned or suspended by CELAC, the government decided not to attend the summit, claiming that it had not been invited to it.[1][2]

On 28 January 2013, the President of Cuba Raúl Castro succeeded President of Chile Sebastián Piñera as the pro tempore president of the CELAC.[3] This was criticized Cuban exile organizations Cuban American National Foundation, Cuban Democratic Directorate, Assembly of the Resistance, Cuban Liberty Council, as well as the Politically Persecuted Venezuelans Abroad (Veppex).[4]

I EU-CELAC summitEdit

On 26 January 2013, before the I CELAC summit, the I EU-CELAC summit was held. It was the 7th bi-regional summit and the first to have the CELAC as the European Union counterpart in Latin America and the Caribbean.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "La cumbre de la Celac reanuda su sesión con un homenaje a Chávez, Lula, Calderón y Fernández". eldiario.es (in Spanish). Santiago. EFE. 28 January 2013. Retrieved 9 July 2019.
  2. ^ "Paraguay decidió no asistir a Celac". ABC Color (in Spanish). 25 January 2013. Retrieved 9 July 2019.
  3. ^ "Cuba asume la presidencia de la Celac". eldiario.es (in Spanish). Santiago. EFE. 28 January 2013. Retrieved 9 July 2019.
  4. ^ Osorio, Sonia (29 January 2013). "El exilio cubano califica de "vergüenza" que Raúl Castro presida la Celac". eldiario.es (in Spanish). EFE. Retrieved 9 July 2019.
  5. ^ "1st EU-CELAC Summit of Heads of State and Government". EU–LAC Foundation. Retrieved 10 July 2019.

External linksEdit