2003 Beach Soccer World Championships

The 2003 Beach Soccer World Championships was the ninth edition of the Beach Soccer World Championships, the most prestigious competition in international beach soccer contested by men's national teams until 2005, when the competition was then replaced by the second iteration of a world cup in beach soccer, the better known FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup.[1] It was organized by Brazilian sports agency Koch Tavares in cooperation with and under the supervision of Beach Soccer Worldwide (BSWW), the sports governing body.[2]

2003 Beach Soccer World Championships
IX Beach Soccer World Championships 2003
IX Campeonato Mundial de Beach Soccer (in Portuguese)
2003 Beach Soccer World Championship.gif
Tournament details
Host countryBrazil
Dates16 – 23 February
Teams8 (from 4 confederations)
Venue(s)1 (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Brazil (8th title)
Runners-up Spain
Third place Portugal
Fourth place France
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored150 (9.38 per match)
Attendance74,700 (4,669 per match)
Top scorer(s)Brazil Neném (15 goals)
Best player(s)Spain Amarelle
Best goalkeeperBrazil Robertinho
2002
2004

For the first time since 2000, the tournament returned to its native venue at Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The main sponsor was McDonald's.[2]

The tournament saw Brazil win their eighth title by beating first time finalists Spain.

OrganisationEdit

As like in the previous year, a record low of eight nations competed in two groups of four teams in a round robin format. The top two teams in each group after all the matches of the group stage had been played progressed into the semi-finals, in which the championship proceeded as a knock-out tournament therein until a winner was crowned, with an additional match to decide third place.

TeamsEdit

QualificationEdit

European teams gained qualification by finishing in the top three spots of the 2002 Euro Beach Soccer League. North and South American qualification was based on performances over recent times in a series of events involving teams from the Americas. The other entries received wild-card invites.[3]

Africa and Oceania were unrepresented.

EntrantsEdit

This remains the only year in all nineteen editions when no new nations made their debut at a world cup.

Group stageEdit

Matches are listed as local time in Rio de Janeiro, (UTC-3)

Group AEdit

Pos Team Pld W W+ L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Brazil 3 3 0 0 26 6 +20 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   Spain 3 2 0 1 19 13 +6 6
3   Italy 3 1 0 2 11 19 –8 3
4   United States 3 0 0 3 8 26 –18 0
Brazil  6–3  Spain
Junior Negão    
Buru  
Neném  
Benjamin  
Report   Nico
   Eloy
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: Carlos Robles (Chile)

Spain  8–3  United States
Amarelle    
Nico  
Busti  
Eloy  
Q. Setien  
David  
Report    Francis
  Beto
Attendance: 4 200
Referee: Elias Coelho (Brazil)
Brazil  7–2  Italy
Junior Negão  
Neném   
Benjamin    
Juninho  
Report   Fruzzetti
  D’Amico
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: Pinto Correia (Portugal)

Italy  5–4  United States
Ferrigno   
D’Amico  
Fruzzetti  
Garlini  
Report   Albuquerque
  Ed
  Francis
  Beto
Attendance: 2 000
Referee: José Luiz da Rosa (Uruguay)

Brazil  13–1  United States
Jorginho   
Júnior Negão  
Benjamin   
Neném       
Juninho  
Júlio César  
Report   Beto
Attendance: 4 500
Referee: Lakhdar Benchabane (France)
Spain  8–4  Italy
Q.Setien   
Eloy  
Amarelle   
Nico   
Javi  
Report   Garlini
  Costacurta
   Fruzzetti
Attendance: 3 000
Referee: Elias Coelho (Brazil)

Group BEdit

Pos Team Pld W W+ L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   France 3 2 0 1 20 14 +6 6 Advance to knockout stage
2   Portugal 3 2 0 1 14 10 +4 6
3   Uruguay 3 2 0 1 9 9 0 6
4   Japan 3 0 0 3 4 14 –10 0
Uruguay  2–1  Japan
Fabian  
German  
Report   Mochizuki
Attendance: 4 500
Referee: Antonio Buaiz (Brazil)
France  8–6  Portugal
Bonora  
Edouard  
Ottavy   
Sciortino   
Samoun   
Report    Madjer
   Hernani
  Belchior
  Alan
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: Carlos Robles (Chile)

Uruguay  6–5  France
Nico   
Fabian  
Pico  
Chueco  
German  
Report   Sciortino
  Jairzinho
  Marquet
  Samoun
  Cantona
Attendance: 2 000
Referee: Evaldo Wellington (Brazil)
Portugal  5–1  Japan
Alan  
Madjer     
Report   Touma
Attendance: 2 000
Referee: Elias Coelho (Brazil)

France  7–2  Japan
Sciortino    
Jairzinho  
Bonora   
Cantona  
Report   Mochizuki
  Kawakubo
Attendance: 4 500
Referee: Massimo Magrini (Italy)
Portugal  3–1  Uruguay
Alan   
Setemeio  
Report   Nico
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: Carlos Robles (Chile)

Knockout stageEdit

February 21 was allocated as a rest day.

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
22 February
 
 
  Brazil7
 
23 February
 
  Portugal2
 
  Brazil8
 
22 February
 
  Spain2
 
  Spain5
 
 
  France4
 
Third place play-off
 
 
23 February
 
 
  Portugal7
 
 
  France4

Semi-finalsEdit

Spain  5–4  France
Amarelle     
Nico  
Report   Jairzinho
  Bonora
  Sciortino
  Marquet
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: Antonio Buaiz (Brazil)

Brazil  7–2  Portugal
Buru  
Jorginho  
Benjamin  
Neném    
Júnior Negão  
Report   Madjer
  Hernani
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: Carlos Robles (Chile)

Third place play-offEdit

Portugal  7–4  France
Madjer    
Alan  
Belchior  
Pedro Vieira  
Pedro Jorge  
Report   Marquet
  Cantona
  Sciortino
  Bonora
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: João Alberto (Brazil)

FinalEdit

Brazil  8–2  Spain
Júnior Negão    
Benjamin  
Neném    
Jorginho  
Report   Amarelle
  Nico
Attendance: 6 000
Referee: José Luiz da Rosa (Uruguay)

WinnersEdit

 2003 Beach Soccer World Championships
Champions 
 
Brazil
Eighth title

AwardsEdit

Top scorer
  Neném
15 goals
Best player
  Amarelle
Best goalkeeper
  Robertinho
Rookie of the year
  Eloy Barreiro

Top goalscorersEdit

Final standingsEdit

Pos Grp Team Pld W W+ L GF GA GD Pts Final result
1 A   Brazil 5 5 0 0 41 10 +31 15 Champions
2 A   Spain 5 3 0 2 26 25 +1 9 Runners-up
3 B   Portugal 5 3 0 2 23 21 +2 9 Third place
4 B   France 5 2 0 3 28 26 +2 6 Fourth place
5 B   Uruguay 3 2 0 1 9 9 0 6 Eliminated in the
group stage
6 A   Italy 3 1 0 2 11 19 −8 3
7 B   Japan 3 0 0 3 4 14 −10 0
8 A   United States 3 0 0 3 8 26 −18 0
Source: [1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FIFA launches first ever FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup". FIFA.com. 1 February 2005. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Rio volta a sediar Mundial, em fevereiro, na Praia de Copacabana" (in Portuguese). beachsoccerbrasil.com.br. 30 January 2003. Archived from the original on May 12, 2003. Retrieved 8 May 2016.
  3. ^ "IX Campeonato Mundial de Beach Soccer, 16 a 23 de fevereiro/2003, Praia de Copacabana/RJ" (in Portuguese). beachsoccerbrasil.com.br. Archived from the original on 18 June 2003. Retrieved 8 May 2016.

SourcesEdit