Open main menu

The 2000 UEFA European Under-21 Championship was the 12th staging of UEFA's European Under-21 Championship. The final tournament was hosted by Slovakia from 27 May to 3 June 2000. The tournament had 47 entrants. Northern Ireland competed for the first time. For the first time a finals tournament with two groups of four teams was held, with one of those teams, Slovakia, having been chosen as the hosts.[1] The top four teams in this competition qualified for the 2000 Summer Olympics.[2]

2000 UEFA European Under-21 Championship
Majstrovstvá Európy vo futbale hráčov do 21 rokov 2000
Tournament details
Host country Slovakia
Dates27 May – 3 June
Teams8 (finals)
47 (qualifying)
Venue(s)4 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Italy (4th title)
Runners-up Czech Republic
Third place Spain
Fourth place Slovakia
Tournament statistics
Matches played14
Goals scored40 (2.86 per match)
Top scorer(s)Italy Andrea Pirlo (2 goals)
Czech Republic David Jarolím (2 goals)
Croatia Igor Tudor (2 goals)
Czech Republic Lukáš Došek (2 goals)
Best player(s)Italy Andrea Pirlo
1998
2002

Italy won the competition for the fourth time, thus qualified for the Olympic Games finals, alongside Czech Republic, Slovakia and Spain.

QualificationEdit

The 47 national teams were divided into nine groups (seven groups of 5 + two groups of 6). The records of the nine group runners-up were then compared. The top seven joined the nine winners in a play-off for the eight finals spots. One of the eight qualifiers was then chosen to host the remaining fixtures.

Qualified teamsEdit

Country Qualified as Date qualification was secured Previous appearances in tournament1, 2
  Italy 00 Group 1 and play-off winner 17 November 1999 10 (1978, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996)
  Turkey 01 Group 3 and play-off winner 16 November 1999 0 (debut)
  England3 02 Group 5 and play-off winner 29 March 2000 6 (1978, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988)
  Spain 03 Group 6 and play-off winner 16 November 1999 10 (1978, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1994, 1996, 1998)
  Netherlands 04 Group 6 runners-up and play-off winner 17 November 1999 3 (1988, 1992, 1998)
  Slovakia (hosts) 05 Group 7 and play-off winner 17 November 1999 0 (debut)
  Croatia 06 Group 8 and play-off winner 17 November 1999 0 (debut)
  Czech Republic 07 Group 9 runners-up and play-off winner 17 November 1999 1 (1996)
1 Bold indicates champion for that year
2 Italic indicates host for that year
3 England were originally scheduled to play two legs against Yugoslavia. However, the first leg which was supposed to have taken place in Belgrade was cancelled due to political tensions.[3] An alternative leg in Luxembourg was also cancelled due to security reasons.[3] A second leg at Mini Estadi in Barcelona was held on 29 March 2000, which England won 3–0.[4]

SquadsEdit

VenuesEdit

Match officialsEdit

Seven match officials and nine assistants were selected for the competition, including two officials representing the Asian Football Confederation (AFC), Selearajen Subramaniam from Malaysia and Hamdi Al Kadri from Syria.[6]

Country Referee Assistants Fourth officials Matches refereed
  France Stéphane Bré Egon Bereuter (Austria) Vincent Texier (France) Vladimír Hriňák (Slovakia)
Leslie Irvine (Northern Ireland)
Croatia 1–2 Netherlands
England 6–0 Turkey
  Germany Herbert Fandel Harald Sather (Germany) Kostantin Piskov (Bulgaria)
Egon Bereuter (Austria)
Selearajen Subramaniam (Malaysia)
Stéphane Bré (France)
Czech Republic 3–1 Netherlands
England 0–2 Slovakia
  Malaysia Selearajen Subramaniam Kostantin Piskov (Bulgaria) Hamdi Al Kadri (Syria) Vladimír Hriňák (Slovakia) Czech Republic 3–1 Netherlands
  Northern Ireland Leslie Irvine John McElhinney (Scotland)
Egon Bereuter (Austria)
Mikhail Semionov (Russia)
Hamdi Al Kadri (Syria)
Valentin Ivanov (Russia)
Selearajen Subramaniam (Malaysia)
Spain 1–1 Czech Republic
Spain 1–0 Slovakia
  Russia Valentin Ivanov Mikhail Semionov (Russia)
Kostantin Piskov (Bulgaria)
Maciej Wierzbowski (Poland)
Mikhail Semionov (Russia)
Karl-Erik Nilsson (Sweden)
Selearajen Subramaniam (Malaysia)
Spain 0–0 Croatia
Turkey 1–3 Italy
  Sweden Karl-Erik Nilsson Maciej Wierzbowski (Poland) Hamdi Al Kadri (Syria)
Ferenc Székely (Hungary)
Kostantin Piskov (Bulgaria)
Leslie Irvine (Northern Ireland)
Dieter Schoch (Switzerland)
Czech Republic 4–3 Croatia
Slovakia 2–1 Turkey
Czech Republic 1–2 Italy
  Switzerland Dieter Schoch Ferenc Székely (Hungary) John McElhinney (Scotland) Vladimír Hriňák (Slovakia)
Herbert Fandel (Germany)
Netherlands 0–1 Spain
Italy 1–1 Slovakia

MatchesEdit

Group stageEdit

Group AEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  Czech Republic 3 2 1 0 8 5 +3 7
  Spain 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1 5
  Netherlands 3 1 0 2 3 5 −2 3
  Croatia 3 0 1 2 4 6 −2 1

Czech Republic  3–1  Netherlands
Jankulovski   28'
Jarolím   54'82'
Report Lurling   18'
Referee: Selearajen Subramaniam (Malaysia)

Netherlands  0–1  Spain
Report Angulo   6'
Czech Republic  4–3  Croatia
L. Došek   44' (pen.)
Baroš   54'
Petrouš   61' (pen.)
Sionko   80'
Report Šerić   4'
Tudor   57'85'

Group BEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  Italy 3 2 1 0 6 2 +4 7
  Slovakia 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3 7
  England 3 1 0 2 6 4 +2 3
  Turkey 3 0 0 3 2 11 −9 0
Italy  2–0  England
Comandini   24'
Pirlo   45' (pen.)
Report
Slovakia  2–1  Turkey
Greško   6'
Čišovský   67'
Report Dursun   63'

Italy  1–1  Slovakia
Baronio   17' Report Babnič   73'
Referee: Dieter Schoch (Switzerland)
England  6–0  Turkey
Lampard   28'
Jeffers   45'
Cort   66'
King   73'
Mills   77'
Campbell   90'
Report

Turkey  1–3  Italy
S. Akın   54' Report Spinesi   14'
Baronio   36' (pen.)
Ventola   83'
England  0–2  Slovakia
Report Babnič   67'
Németh   74'

Knockout stageEdit

Third place play-offEdit

FinalEdit

Czech Republic  1–2  Italy
T. Došek   51' Report Pirlo   42' (pen.)81'
Attendance: 9,900

GoalscorersEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2000/2002 Under-21 Qualification Round Draw made". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 14 December 1999. Archived from the original on 20 October 2000. Retrieved 14 October 2014.
  2. ^ "Competition format: Slovakia 2000". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Archived from the original on 10 February 2001. Retrieved 12 October 2014.
  3. ^ a b "Reshuffled youngsters head for Barcelona". BBC News. British Broadcasting Corporation. 27 March 2000. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  4. ^ Lansley, Pete (30 March 2000). "Heskey abuse taints play-off win". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  5. ^ "Venue guide: Slovakia 2000". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Archived from the original on 10 February 2001. Retrieved 12 October 2014.
  6. ^ "Match officials: Slovakia 2000". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Archived from the original on 10 February 2001. Retrieved 12 October 2014.
  7. ^ "2000: Andrea Pirlo". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 July 2000. Retrieved 14 October 2014.

External linksEdit