1998–99 San Antonio Spurs season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the San Antonio Spurs' 32nd season as a franchise, the team's 26th season in San Antonio, and the team's 23rd season in the National Basketball Association.[1] On March 23, 1998, the owners of all 29 NBA teams voted 27–2 to reopen the league's collective bargaining agreement, seeking changes to the league's salary cap system, and a ceiling on individual player salaries. The National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) opposed to the owners' plan, and wanted raises for players who earned the league's minimum salary. After both sides failed to reach an agreement, the owners called for a lockout, which began on July 1, 1998, putting a hold on all team trades, free agent signings and training camp workouts, and cancelling many NBA regular season and preseason games.[2][3][4][5][6] Due to the lockout, the NBA All-Star Game, which was scheduled to be played in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on February 14, 1999, was also cancelled.[7][8][9][10][11] However, on January 6, 1999, NBA commissioner David Stern, and NBPA director Billy Hunter finally reached an agreement to end the lockout. The deal was approved by both the players and owners, and was signed on January 20, ending the lockout after 204 days. The regular season began on February 5, and was cut short to just 50 games instead of the regular 82-game schedule.[12][13][14][15][16]

1998–99 San Antonio Spurs season
NBA champions
Conference champions
Division champions
Head coachGregg Popovich
General managerGregg Popovich
PresidentGregg Popovich (vice)
Owner(s)Peter Holt
ArenaAlamodome
Results
Record37–13 (.740)
PlaceDivision: 1st (Midwest)
Conference: 1st (Western)
Playoff finishNBA Champions
(Defeated Knicks 4–1)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
Local media
TelevisionKSAT-TV
KRRT
Fox Sports Southwest
RadioWOAI
< 1997–98 1999–00 >

During the off-season, the Spurs acquired second-year guard Antonio Daniels from the Vancouver Grizzlies,[17][18][19] acquired three-point specialist Steve Kerr from the Chicago Bulls,[20][21][22][23] and signed free agents Mario Elie,[22][24][25] and Jerome Kersey.[22][26][25] After a promising rookie season from second-year star Tim Duncan, the Spurs got off to a slow start posting a 6–8 record in February.[27] However, in March and April, they won 31 of their final 36 games on their way to a league-best 37–13 season record, roughly equivalent to 61–21 in a full season.[28]

Duncan averaged 21.7 points, 11.4 rebounds and 2.5 blocks per game, and was named to the All-NBA First Team, and to the NBA All-Defensive First Team, while David Robinson averaged 15.8 points, 10.0 rebounds and 2.4 blocks per game. In addition, Sean Elliott provided the team with 11.2 points per game, and Elie and Avery Johnson both contributed 9.7 points per game each, while Johnson led the team with 7.4 assists per game.[29] Duncan also finished in third place in Most Valuable Player voting behind Karl Malone and Alonzo Mourning,[30][31][32] and Robinson finished in fourth place in Defensive Player of the Year voting, while Duncan finished tied in fifth place.[33]

In the Western Conference First Round of the playoffs, the Spurs defeated the Minnesota Timberwolves three games to one.[34][35][36][37] In the Western Conference Semi-finals, the Spurs' "Twin Towers" of Duncan and Robinson outplayed Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant as they swept the Los Angeles Lakers in four straight games.[38][39][40][41] In the Western Conference Finals, the Spurs faced the Portland Trail Blazers. After taking Game 1 with an 80–76 win,[42][43][44] the Spurs trailed by 17 points in Game 2. However, the Spurs made a fourth-quarter run that culminated with a game-winning three-pointer from Elliott, as they won 86–85.[45][46][47][48][49] The Spurs went on to sweep the Trail Blazers in four straight games, becoming the first former American Basketball Association (ABA) team to play in the NBA Finals.[50][51][52][53]

In the Finals, the Spurs defeated the eighth-seeded New York Knicks in five games. Johnson hit the title-winning shot with 47 seconds left to seal the Spurs' first title in franchise history. Duncan was named Finals MVP.[54][55][56][57][58] Kerr, who previously won three straight championships with the Chicago Bulls, won his fourth consecutive title. Following the season, Will Perdue re-signed as a free agent with his former team, the Chicago Bulls.[59][60]

Offseason

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On June 24, 1998, the Spurs traded Carl Herrera and first-round draft pick Felipe Lopez to the Vancouver Grizzlies for guard Antonio Daniels.[61][62][19] The team also signed free agents Mario Elie, Steve Kerr and Jerome Kersey during the offseason.[25][63]

NBA draft

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Round Pick Player Position Nationality College
1 24 Felipe López Guard   Dominican Republic St. John's
2 52 Derrick Dial Guard   United States Eastern Michigan

Roster

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1998–99 San Antonio Spurs roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Name Height Weight DOB From
G 33 Daniels, Antonio 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1975–03–19 Bowling Green
F/C 21 Duncan, Tim 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 250 lb (113 kg) 1976–04–25 Wake Forest
G/F 17 Elie, Mario 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) 210 lb (95 kg) 1963–11–26 American International
F 32 Elliott, Sean 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1968–02–02 Arizona
G/F 10 Gaze, Andrew 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1965–07–24 Seton Hall
G 2 Jackson, Jaren 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1967–10–27 Georgetown
G 6 Johnson, Avery 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1965–03–25 Southern
G 4 Kerr, Steve 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1965–09–29 Arizona
F 25 Kersey, Jerome 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 215 lb (98 kg) 1962–06–26 Longwood
F 54 King, Gerard 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 230 lb (104 kg) 1972–11–25 Nicholls State
C 41 Perdue, Will 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 240 lb (109 kg) 1965–08–29 Vanderbilt
C 50 Robinson, David 7 ft 1 in (2.16 m) 235 lb (107 kg) 1965–08–06 Navy
F 31 Rose, Malik 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 250 lb (113 kg) 1974–11–23 Drexel
G 11 Williams, Brandon 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 215 lb (98 kg) 1975–02–27 Davidson
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend
  • (DP) Unsigned draft pick
  • (FA) Free agent
  • (S) Suspended
  •   Injured

Roster
Last transaction: {{{access-date}}}

Regular season

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Season standings

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W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-San Antonio Spurs 37 13 .740 21–4 16–9 17–4
x-Utah Jazz 37 13 .740 22–3 15–10 15–3
x-Houston Rockets 31 19 .620 6 19–6 12–13 12–9
x-Minnesota Timberwolves 25 25 .500 12 18–7 7–18 11–9
Dallas Mavericks 19 31 .380 18 15–10 4–21 8–12
Denver Nuggets 14 36 .280 23 12–13 2–23 5–16
Vancouver Grizzlies 8 42 .160 29 7–18 1–24 3–18
#
Team W L PCT GB
1 z-San Antonio Spurs 37 13 .740
2 y-Portland Trail Blazers 35 15 .700 2
3 x-Utah Jazz 37 13 .740
4 x-Los Angeles Lakers 31 19 .620 6
5 x-Houston Rockets 31 19 .620 6
6 x-Sacramento Kings 27 23 .540 10
7 x-Phoenix Suns 27 23 .540 10
8 x-Minnesota Timberwolves 25 25 .500 12
9 Seattle SuperSonics 25 25 .500 12
10 Golden State Warriors 21 29 .420 16
11 Dallas Mavericks 19 31 .380 18
12 Denver Nuggets 14 36 .280 23
13 Los Angeles Clippers 9 41 .180 28
14 Vancouver Grizzlies 8 42 .160 29
z - clinched division title
y - clinched division title
x - clinched playoff spot

Record vs. opponents

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1998-99 NBA Records
Team ATL BOS CHA CHI CLE DAL DEN DET GSW HOU IND LAC LAL MIA MIL MIN NJN NYK ORL PHI PHO POR SAC SAS SEA TOR UTA VAN WAS
Atlanta 3–0 3–0 3–1 2–1 0–1 0–0 1–2 0–0 1–0 3–1 1–0 0–0 0–3 1–2 0–0 1–2 2–1 2–2 2–1 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–1 0–0 1–0 2–1
Boston 0–3 1–2 2–1 2–2 0–0 1–0 0–3 0–0 0–0 0–3 1–0 0–0 3–0 0–3 0–1 1–2 1–2 1–2 1–2 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–0 0–0 1–2 0–0 1–0 3–1
Charlotte 0–3 2–1 2–1 2–1 0–0 0–0 3–0 0–1 0–0 1–2 0–0 0–1 1–2 2–2 0–0 3–0 1–3 1–2 1–2 1–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–1 1–0 0–0 2–1
Chicago 1–3 1–2 1–2 0–3 0–1 0–0 0–3 0–0 0–0 0–3 1–0 0–0 1–2 1–3 0–0 2–1 1–2 0–3 1–2 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–1 1–2 0–1 1–0 1–2
Cleveland 1–2 2–2 1–2 3–0 0–0 0–0 1–2 1–0 0–1 0–3 0–0 1–0 0–3 1–2 0–0 3–0 1–2 1–2 1–2 1–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–0 2–2 0–1 0–0 1–2
Dallas 1–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–0 2–1 0–1 2–2 2–2 0–0 3–0 0–3 0–1 0–0 1–2 0–1 0–0 1–0 0–0 1–3 0–3 2–2 1–3 0–3 0–0 0–3 2–1 0–0
Denver 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–2 0–0 1–3 0–4 0–1 3–0 1–2 0–1 1–0 0–3 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–3 0–3 0–3 0–4 2–2 0–0 1–2 3–1 0–1
Detroit 2–1 3–0 0–3 3–0 2–1 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–1 0–0 0–0 2–1 2–1 0–1 2–1 2–1 0–4 1–3 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 1–0 2–1 1–0 0–0 2–1
Golden State 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–0 0–1 2–2 3–1 0–0 0–3 1–0 2–1 1–2 0–0 0–1 2–2 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–0 1–2 2–2 1–2 0–3 1–2 0–0 0–4 4–0 0–0
Houston 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 2–2 4–0 0–0 3–0 0–0 3–1 1–2 0–1 0–0 2–1 1–0 0–0 0–1 0–0 2–2 2–1 3–0 0–3 2–1 1–0 0–3 4–0 0–0
Indiana 1–2 3–0 2–1 3–0 3–0 0–0 1–0 1–2 0–1 0–0 0–0 1–0 2–2 3–0 0–0 3–1 2–1 1–2 1–2 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–1 0–0 1–0 3–0
L.A. Clippers 0–1 0–1 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–3 0–3 0–0 1–2 1–3 0–0 0–4 0–0 0–0 2–2 1–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–3 1–2 1–2 0–3 0–3 0–1 1–3 1–3 0–0
L.A. Lakers 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–0 0–1 3–0 2–1 0–0 2–1 2–1 0–1 4–0 0–0 0–0 2–1 0–0 1–0 1–0 0–1 3–1 2–2 1–2 2–1 2–2 0–0 1–3 2–1 0–0
Miami 3–0 0–3 2–1 2–1 3–0 1–0 1–0 1–2 0–0 1–0 2–2 0–0 0–0 2–1 0–1 3–1 2–2 2–1 2–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 3–0 0–1 0–0 3–0
Milwaukee 2–1 3–0 2–2 3–1 2–1 0–0 0–1 1–2 1–0 0–0 0–3 0–0 0–0 1–2 1–0 2–1 2–1 1–2 1–2 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 3–1 0–0 0–0 2–1
Minnesota 0–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–1 3–0 1–0 2–2 1–2 0–0 2–2 1–2 1–0 0–1 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 1–2 0–3 3–1 2–2 2–1 0–1 0–3 3–1 0–0
New Jersey 2–1 2–1 0–3 1–2 0–3 1–0 0–1 1–2 0–0 0–1 1–3 0–1 0–0 1–3 1–2 0–0 0–3 0–3 1–2 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 1–0 2–1 0–0 0–0 2–1
New York 1–2 2–1 3–1 2–1 2–1 0–0 0–0 1–2 0–0 0–0 1–2 1–0 0–1 2–2 1–2 1–0 3–0 0–3 3–1 1–0 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 1–2 0–0 0–0 2–1
Orlando 2–2 2–1 2–1 3–0 2–1 0–1 0–0 4–0 1–0 1–0 2–1 0–0 0–1 1–2 2–1 0–0 3–0 3–0 1–2 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–1 0–0 1–2 0–0 0–0 2–1
Philadelphia 1–2 2–1 2–1 2–1 2–1 0–0 0–0 3–1 0–0 0–0 2–1 0–0 1–0 1–2 2–1 0–0 2–1 1–3 2–1 0–0 0–1 1–0 0–1 0–1 2–1 0–0 1–0 1–2
Phoenix 0–1 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–1 3–1 3–0 0–1 2–1 2–2 0–0 3–0 1–3 0–0 1–0 2–1 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–3 0–3 2–2 3–0 0–0 2–2 3–0 0–0
Portland 0–0 1–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 3–0 3–0 0–0 2–2 1–2 1–0 2–1 2–2 0–0 0–0 3–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 3–0 4–0 1–3 2–2 0–0 1–2 4–0 0–0
Sacramento 0–0 1–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 2–2 3–0 0–0 2–1 0–3 0–0 2–1 2–1 0–0 0–0 1–3 0–0 1–0 0–1 0–1 3–0 0–4 1–2 2–2 0–0 1–2 4–0 1–0
San Antonio 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–1 3–1 4–0 1–0 3–0 3–0 0–0 3–0 1–2 0–0 0–0 2–2 0–0 0–0 1–0 1–0 2–2 3–1 2–1 2–1 0–1 2–1 3–0 0–0
Seattle 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–0 3–0 2–2 0–1 2–1 1–2 0–0 3–0 2–2 0–0 0–1 1–2 0–1 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–3 2–2 2–2 1–2 0–0 2–2 2–1 0–1
Toronto 1–2 2–1 1–2 2–1 2–2 0–0 0–0 1–2 0–0 0–1 1–2 1–0 0–0 0–3 1–3 1–0 1–2 2–1 2–1 1–2 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 2–2
Utah 0–0 0–0 0–1 1–0 1–0 3–0 2–1 0–1 4–0 3–0 0–0 3–1 3–1 1–0 0–0 3–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–2 2–1 2–1 1–2 2–2 0–0 3–0 1–0
Vancouver 0–1 0–1 0–0 0–1 0–0 1–2 1–3 0–0 0–3 0–4 0–1 3–1 1–2 0–0 0–0 1–3 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–3 0–3 0–4 0–3 1–2 0–1 0–3 0–0
Washington 1–2 1–3 1–2 2–1 2–1 0–0 1–0 1–2 0–1 0–0 0–3 0–0 0–0 0–3 1–2 0–0 1–2 1–2 1–2 2–1 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–0 1–0 2–2 0–1 0–0

Game log

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Regular season

edit
1998–99 game log
Total: 37–13 (Home: 21–4; Road: 16–9)
February: 6–8 (home: 4–3; road: 2–5)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Record
1 February 5 Sacramento W 101–83 Tim Duncan (19) Tim Duncan (17) Avery Johnson (6) Alamodome
19,002
1–0
2 February 6 Minnesota W 96–82 Tim Duncan, Sean Elliott (22) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (9) Alamodome
21,319
2–0
3 February 8 L. A. Lakers L 75–80 Tim Duncan (19) Tim Duncan (15) Mario Elie (6) Alamodome
33,788
2–1
4 February 9 @ Minnesota L 70–74 David Robinson (16) David Robinson, Tim Duncan (11) Avery Johnson (10) Target Center
16,422
2–2
5 February 11 @ Cleveland L 89–99 Tim Duncan (31) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (7) Gund Arena
14,228
2–3
6 February 12 @ Philadelphia W 98–94 Malik Rose (22) Malik Rose (9) Avery Johnson (5) First Union Center
16,892
3–3
7 February 14 @ Chicago W 98–94 David Robinson (22) Tim Duncan (14) Tim Duncan (4) United Center
22,386
4–3
8 February 17 Phoenix L 76–79 Tim Duncan (20) Tim Duncan (12) Avery Johnson (7) Alamodome
16,419
4–4
9 February 19 @ L. A. Lakers L 94–106 Tim Duncan (26) Tim Duncan (11) Mario Elie (4) Great Western Forum
17,505
4–5
10 February 21 Detroit W 85–64 Tim Duncan (17) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (5) Alamodome
19,495
5–5
11 February 22 @ Minnesota L 89–95 Avery Johnson (20) David Robinson (17) Avery Johnson (5) Target Center
15,374
5–6
12 February 24 Seattle W 99–81 David Robinson (29) David Robinson (17) Avery Johnson (7) Alamodome
15,209
6–6
13 February 26 @ Seattle L 82–92 Tim Duncan (22) David Robinson (14) Avery Johnson (8) KeyArena
17,072
6–7
14 February 28 Utah L 87–101 Tim Duncan (21) Tim Duncan (13) Mario Elie (6) Alamodome
18,165
6–8
March: 14–2 (home: 6–1; road: 8–1)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Record
15 March 2 @ Houston W 99–82 Tim Duncan (23) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (13) Compaq Center
16,285
7–8
16 March 4 @ Dallas W 95–79 Tim Duncan (26) Tim Duncan (12) Avery Johnson (10) Reunion Arena
14,719
8–8
17 March 6 L. A. Clippers W 114–85 Tim Duncan (27) David Robinson (10) Avery Johnson (10) Alamodome
18,394
9–8
18 March 7 @ Denver W 106–96 Tim Duncan (34) Tim Duncan (13) Avery Johnson (14) McNichols Sports Arena
12,037
10–8
19 March 10 Orlando W 81–79 David Robinson (19) Tim Duncan (11) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
17,954
11–8
20 March 12 @ Phoenix W 99–97 Tim Duncan (26) David Robinson (15) Avery Johnson (8) America West Arena
19,023
12–8
21 March 13 Denver W 92–61 Tim Duncan (27) Tim Duncan, Will Perdue (8) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
32,982
13–8
22 March 16 @ Sacramento W 121–109 Tim Duncan (29) Tim Duncan (12) Avery Johnson (15) ARCO Arena
14,570
14–8
23 March 17 @ Golden State W 82–78 Tim Duncan, Malik Rose (17) Tim Duncan (17) Avery Johnson (6) The Arena in Oakland
10,257
15–8
24 March 19 @ Portland L 85–90 Tim Duncan (29) Tim Duncan (15) Avery Johnson (8) Rose Garden Arena
20,041
15–9
25 March 20 @ Vancouver W 92–88 (OT) Tim Duncan (24) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (9) General Motors Place
19,193
16–9
26 March 23 Denver W 112–82 Tim Duncan (19) David Robinson (9) Avery Johnson (7) Alamodome
16,501
17–9
27 March 25 @ Denver W 86–65 Tim Duncan (28) David Robinson (13) David Robinson (5) McNichols Sports Arena
10,695
18–9
28 March 26 Toronto L 91–93 David Robinson (24) David Robinson (16) Avery Johnson (11) Alamodome
16,290
18–10
29 March 27 Dallas W 99–77 Tim Duncan (21) Tim Duncan (15) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
25,921
19–10
30 March 30 Seattle W 95–87 Tim Duncan (26) David Robinson (10) Avery Johnson (9) Alamodome
16,565
20–10
April: 13–3 (home: 9–0; road: 4–3)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Record
31 April 1 Vancouver W 103–91 Tim Duncan (39) Tim Duncan (13) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
16,384
21–10
32 April 3 L. A. Clippers W 103–82 David Robinson, Mario Elie (19) David Robinson (13) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
17,915
22–10
33 April 5 Golden State W 93–86 David Robinson, Tim Duncan (25) David Robinson (16) Avery Johnson (4) Alamodome
14,773
23–10
34 April 8 @ Houston W 92–83 Sean Elliott (19) Tim Duncan (13) Avery Johnson (10) Compaq Center
16,285
24–10
35 April 10 @ Phoenix L 84–110 Tim Duncan (21) Tim Duncan (10) Avery Johnson (6) America West Arena
19,023
24–11
36 April 12 Phoenix W 94–77 Tim Duncan (26) David Robinson (13) Tim Duncan, Sean Elliott (4) Alamodome
14,352
25–11
37 April 13 @ Dallas L 86–92 David Robinson (22) Tim Duncan (11) Avery Johnson (5) Reunion Arena
13,142
25–12
38 April 14 Minnesota W 95–79 David Robinson (21) David Robinson (15) Avery Johnson (6) Alamodome
15,864
26–12
39 April 16 Portland W 81–80 David Robinson, Tim Duncan (20) Tim Duncan (12) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
21,368
27–12
40 April 18 Houston W 86–83 Mario Elie (21) David Robinson (14) Avery Johnson, Tim Duncan (8) Alamodome
24,077
28–12
41 April 20 @ Utah W 83–69 Tim Duncan (36) David Robinson, Malik Rose (11) Avery Johnson, Tim Duncan (8) Delta Center
19,911
29–12
42 April 22 Dallas W 103–76 David Robinson (18) Tim Duncan (10) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
18,720
30–12
43 April 24 L. A. Lakers W 108–81 Tim Duncan (21) Tim Duncan (13) Avery Johnson (12) Alamodome
31,972
31–12
44 April 26 @ L. A. Clippers W 94–88 Tim Duncan (22) David Robinson, Jerome Kersey (7) Avery Johnson, Tim Duncan (7) Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena
8,260
32–12
45 April 27 @ Sacramento L 100–104 (OT) Tim Duncan (32) Tim Duncan (19) Avery Johnson (12) ARCO Arena
16,776
32–13
46 April 29 @ Vancouver W 99–72 Tim Duncan (19) Tim Duncan (10) Avery Johnson (8) General Motors Place
18,448
33–13
May: 4–0 (home: 2–0; road: 2–0)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Record
47 May 1 Portland W 98–90 (OT) David Robinson (26) David Robinson, Tim Duncan (12) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
28,806
34–13
48 May 2 Utah W 84–78 Tim Duncan (26) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (3) Alamodome
35,122
35–13
49 May 4 @ Portland W 87–81 David Robinson (29) David Robinson (12) Tim Duncan, Avery Johnson (6) Rose Garden Arena
20,715
36–13
50 May 5 @ Golden State W 88–81 Tim Duncan (28) David Robinson (20) Sean Elliott (6) The Arena in Oakland
17,235
37–13
1998–99 season schedule

Playoffs

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1999 playoff game log
First Round: 3–1 (home: 1–1; road: 2–0)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Series
1 May 9 Minnesota W 99–86 Tim Duncan (26) Tim Duncan (12) Avery Johnson (10) Alamodome
22,356
1–0
2 May 11 Minnesota L 71–80 Tim Duncan (18) Tim Duncan (16) Mario Elie (4) Alamodome
22,494
1–1
3 May 13 @ Minnesota W 85–71 Avery Johnson (24) David Robinson (18) Duncan, Robinson (7) Target Center
17,444
2–1
4 May 15 @ Minnesota W 92–85 David Robinson (19) David Robinson (11) Avery Johnson (6) Target Center
15,898
3–1
Conference Semifinals: 4–0 (home: 2–0; road: 2–0)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Series
1 May 17 L.A. Lakers W 87–81 Tim Duncan (25) Will Perdue (9) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
25,297
1–0
2 May 19 L.A. Lakers W 79–76 Tim Duncan (21) Tim Duncan (8) Avery Johnson (10) Alamodome
33,293
2–0
3 May 22 @ L.A. Lakers W 103–91 Tim Duncan (37) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (7) Great Western Forum
17,505
3–0
4 May 23 @ L.A. Lakers W 118–107 Tim Duncan (33) Tim Duncan (14) Avery Johnson (10) Great Western Forum
17,505
4–0
Conference Finals: 4–0 (home: 2–0; road: 2–0)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Series
1 May 29 Portland W 80–76 Duncan, Robinson (21) Tim Duncan (13) Avery Johnson (9) Alamodome
35,165
1–0
2 May 31 Portland W 86–85 Tim Duncan (23) Tim Duncan (10) Avery Johnson (7) Alamodome
35,260
2–0
3 June 4 @ Portland W 85–63 Jaren Jackson (19) David Robinson (9) Avery Johnson (8) Rose Garden
20,732
3–0
4 June 6 @ Portland W 94–80 David Robinson (20) David Robinson (10) Avery Johnson (6) Rose Garden
20,735
4–0
NBA Finals: 4–1 (home: 2–0; road: 2–1)
Game Date Team Score High points High rebounds High assists Location
Attendance
Series
1 June 16 New York W 89–77 Tim Duncan (33) Tim Duncan (16) Avery Johnson (8) Alamodome
39,514
1–0
2 June 18 New York W 80–67 Tim Duncan (25) Tim Duncan (15) Avery Johnson (5) Alamodome
39,554
2–0
3 June 21 @ New York L 81–89 David Robinson (25) Tim Duncan (12) Avery Johnson (4) Madison Square Garden
19,763
2–1
4 June 23 @ New York W 96–89 Tim Duncan (28) Tim Duncan (18) Avery Johnson (10) Madison Square Garden
19,763
3–1
5 June 25 @ New York W 78–77 Tim Duncan (31) David Robinson (12) Avery Johnson (9) Madison Square Garden
19,763
4–1
1999 schedule

Player stats

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Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game

Regular season

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Player GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
Antonio Daniels 47 0 13.1 .454 .294 .754 1.1 2.3 .64 .13 4.7
Tim Duncan 50 50 39.3 .495 .143 .690 11.4 2.4 .90 2.52 21.7
Mario Elie 47 37 27.5 .471 .374 .866 2.9 1.9 .98 .26 9.7
Sean Elliott 50 50 30.2 .410 .328 .757 4.3 2.3 .52 .34 11.2
Andrew Gaze 19 0 3.1 .320 .313 .000 .3 .3 .11 .05 1.1
Jaren Jackson 47 13 18.3 .380 .361 .821 2.1 1.0 .87 .19 6.4
Avery Johnson 50 50 33.4 .473 .083 .568 2.4 7.4 1.02 .22 9.7
Steve Kerr 44 0 16.7 .391 .313 .886 1.0 1.1 .52 .07 4.4
Jerome Kersey 45 0 15.5 .340 .214 .429 2.9 .9 .82 .31 3.2
Gerard King 19 0 3.3 .429 .000 .611 .7 .2 .11 .05 1.2
Will Perdue 37 1 12.0 .633 .000 .538 3.7 .5 .24 .27 2.4
David Robinson 49 49 31.7 .509 .000 .658 10.0 2.1 1.41 2.43 15.8
Malik Rose 47 0 12.9 .463 .000 .671 3.9 .6 .85 .47 6.0
Brandon Williams 3 0 1.3 .000 .000 .500 .3 .0 .00 .00 .7

Playoffs

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Player GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
Antonio Daniels 15 0 7.1 .429 .667 .833 .7 1.1 .27 .00 1.8
Tim Duncan 17 17 43.1 .511 .000 .748 11.5 2.8 .76 2.65 23.2
Mario Elie 17 17 30.9 .384 .267 .837 3.5 2.9 1.29 .12 7.9
Sean Elliott 17 17 33.8 .444 .400 .763 3.4 2.6 .53 .24 11.9
Jaren Jackson 17 0 20.3 .382 .360 .692 2.4 1.1 .76 .00 8.2
Avery Johnson 17 17 38.4 .487 .333 .681 2.5 7.4 1.18 .06 12.6
Steve Kerr 11 0 8.8 .267 .231 .833 .8 .7 .18 .00 2.2
Jerome Kersey 14 0 10.9 .349 .250 .714 2.1 .3 .43 .07 2.6
Gerard King 8 0 1.8 .500 .000 .000 .5 .1 .00 .12 .5
Will Perdue 12 0 7.2 .545 .000 .500 2.3 .0 .00 .08 1.1
David Robinson 17 17 35.3 .483 .000 .722 9.9 2.5 1.65 2.35 15.6
Malik Rose 17 0 11.4 .368 .000 .692 2.3 .2 .41 .24 2.7

NBA Finals

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The 1999 NBA Finals saw some firsts for both the Spurs and the opposing New York Knicks.

The Spurs:

  • Became the first former ABA team to play and win in an NBA Finals. (This feat would be duplicated by the Denver Nuggets in 2023.)
  • Attracted record crowds for the two games at the Alamodome. Attendance was 39,514 for Game 1 and 39,554 for Game 2 (the largest crowd to see an NBA Finals game).
  • Steve Kerr became the first non-Celtic to win four straight championships, as he won titles with the Bulls from 1996 to 1998.

The Knicks became the first 8th seed to ever play in an NBA Finals. (This feat would be duplicated by the Miami Heat in 2023.)

Summary

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The following scoring summary is written in a line score format, except that the quarter numbers are replaced by game numbers.

Team Game 1 Game 2 Game 3 Game 4 Game 5 Wins
San Antonio (West) 89 80 81 96 78 4
New York (East) 77 67 89 89 77 1

With time running out in Game 5, and the 1999 championship on the line, the Spurs looked to Avery Johnson as he hit a long clutch 2 from the corner with 47 seconds to go, giving the Spurs a 1-point lead. It was considered one of the franchise's best moments since the first 26 years in San Antonio.

Schedule

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The Finals were played using a 2-3-2 site format, where the first two and last two games are held at the team with home court advantage. The NBA, after experimenting in the early years, restored this original format for the Finals in 1985. So far, the other playoff series are still running on a 2-2-1-1-1 site format.

Award winners

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References

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