1983 WAFL season

The 1983 WAFL season was the 99th season of the West Australian Football League in its various incarnations. The season opened on 31 March and concluded on 17 September with the 1983 WAFL Grand Final contested between Claremont and Swan Districts.

1983 WAFL season
Teams8
PremiersSwan Districts
(5th premiership)
Minor premiersSouth Fremantle
(9th minor premiership)
Matches played88
Bernie Naylor MedallistWarren Ralph (Claremont)
Sandover MedallistJohn Ironmonger (East Perth)
Bryan Cousins (Perth)[a]
← 1982
1984 →

South Fremantle, after a disappointing 1982, and Claremont dominated the competition for most of the year before Swans – after a slow start due to numerous injuries with four losses from eight matches – came home very strongly for a second premiership win in a row. East Perth, with a new coach and required to play fourteen men new to league football, missed the finals for only the second time in eighteen seasons and indeed only the fifth since their dynasty between 1956 and 1961,[1] though a reserves premiership after a drawn preliminary final was partial compensation.

The continuing fall in WAFL attendances despite the growth of Perth's metropolitan population,[2] loss of many star players to the VFL, and resultant financial difficulties for all clubs, led the government of Brian Burke to undergo a review of the WAFL's needs, especially club finances and ground leases, but future seasons did not prove the move successful. In an effort to update their images East Fremantle adopted the moniker "Sharks" and West Perth the "Falcons", and despite considerable scepticism both clubs have retained these nicknames to the present. The blue and whites dominated the pre-season[3] and recovered from a very bad start in the home-and-away rounds to reach fourth position in the last round, but were out of their depths against the top three – who lost only three matches to the remaining five teams all season. The Sharks did win the experimental "Emu Export" lightning carnival held at Subiaco Oval on May 14 and 15, which was regarded by the WAFL as a major flop and never repeated.[4]

For the first time the WAFL allowed six home-and-away matches to be played on Sunday and televised direct to Perth viewers, but attendances at these matches were about half what would have happened otherwise[5] and the WAFL abandoned this for the 1984 season.

Home-and-away seasonEdit

Round 1Edit

Round 1
Saturday, 26 March Perth 12.11 (83) def. by South Fremantle 19.22 (136) Lathlain Park (crowd: 6798)
Saturday, 26 March Swan Districts 20.8 (128) def. by Claremont 26.12 (168) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 12452)
Saturday, 26 March East Fremantle 15.13 (103) def. by Subiaco 22.16 (148) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6129)
Sunday, 27 March West Perth 18.26 (134) def. East Perth 17.13 (115) Leederville Oval (crowd: 13860) [6]
  • Traditional rivals West and East Perth meet in the first WAFL match to be direct telecast to local areas.
  • On a hot 35.9 °C (96.6 °F) day, Claremont’s new-look centreline, incorporating former forward Malaxos, runs over Swans in a convincing reversal of the Grand Final.[7]
  • Subiaco produce surprising form for three quarters against an East Fremantle team that dominated the pre-season – the Lions’ rotation of four ruckmen in the hot conditions works to their advantage and they lead by fifty-six points at three-quarter time.[3]

Round 2 (Easter weekend)Edit

Round 2
Saturday, 2 April South Fremantle 18.11 (119) def. West Perth 16.8 (104) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 13077)
Saturday, 2 April Subiaco 20.18 (138) def. Perth 11.14 (80) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6818)
Monday, 4 April East Perth 22.9 (141) def. by Swan Districts 23.20 (158) Perth Oval (crowd: 14160) [8]
Monday, 4 April Claremont 27.15 (177) def. East Fremantle 13.5 (83) Claremont Oval (crowd: 7474)
  • Swan Districts steal a high-scoring game from the Royals after having been behind by 21, 29 and 25 points at each change.
  • Led by brilliant Aboriginal wingman Greg Kelly, Subiaco surpass their 1982 winning tally after two games against a Perth team that wastes the strong breeze in the first and third quarters.[9]

Round 3Edit

Round 3
Saturday, 9 April Subiaco 9.19 (73) def. by South Fremantle 27.22 (184) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 12653)
Saturday, 9 April West Perth 22.24 (156) def. Perth 14.10 (94) Leederville Oval (crowd: 7874)
Saturday, 9 April East Perth 13.8 (86) def. by Claremont 23.22 (160) Perth Oval (crowd: 10970) [10]
Saturday, 9 April East Fremantle 9.9 (63) def. by Swan Districts 18.24 (132) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5827)
  • Although East Fremantle – led by first-game centre half-forward Ray Sterrett – stay with Swan Districts for a half, the Swans, despite losing Peter Sartori with a finger injury, completely dominate the second half for a third crushing loss by the pre-season pacesetters.[11]
  • South Fremantle burst the Subiaco "bubble" despite losing in the key forward positions all match, as interchange Chris Stasinowsky kicks an astonishing 11.3 (69) after coming on in a forward pocket midway through the second quarter.[12]

Round 4Edit

Round 4
Saturday, 16 April West Perth 20.18 (138) def. Swan Districts 10.13 (73) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 14850)
Saturday, 16 April Perth 13.15 (93) def. by East Perth 18.19 (127) Lathlain Park (crowd: 5527)
Saturday, 16 April Claremont 17.15 (117) def. Subiaco 15.10 (100) Claremont Oval (crowd: 6695)
Sunday, 17 April South Fremantle 24.16 (160) def. East Fremantle 14.9 (93) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 9972)
  • After being two points down early in the third quarter, South Fremantle kick the next nine goals for a win the makes a mockery of East Fremantle’s new image.[13]
  • Swan Districts play so poorly, scoring only 3.7 (25) to 14.15 (99) after the seventeen-minute mark of the second quarter, that coach John Todd withdraws the $7200 payment for the match.[14]
  • Young, tall and hard-working ruckman Laurie Keene nearly leads Subiaco to a huge upset over unbeaten Claremont, but lack of speed in the forward line proves too much of a stumbling block.[15]

Round 5Edit

Round 5
Saturday, 23 April Swan Districts 21.18 (144) def. Subiaco 17.8 (110) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 8820)
Saturday, 23 April East Perth 19.14 (128) def. by South Fremantle 28.14 (182) Perth Oval (crowd: 9027)
Saturday, 23 April West Perth 11.8 (74) def. by Claremont 22.15 (147) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 15784)
Saturday, 23 April East Fremantle 19.22 (136) def. Perth 10.11 (71) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4973) [16]
  • South Fremantle kick 12.4 (76) to 3.4 (22) after scores were level at three-quarter time to stay unbeaten in Bruce Monteath’s 100th match for them. Monteath kicks four of their final-quarter goal spree.[17]
  • Although Ralph finished with 11.6 (72), it is Claremont’s solid, risk-free defence that wins the kudos for a fine victory over the new-look West Perth in perfect weather for high scoring.[18]

Round 6Edit

Round 6
Saturday, 30 April South Fremantle 24.22 (166) def. Swan Districts 13.18 (96) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 14126)
Saturday, 30 April Subiaco 12.17 (89) def. by East Perth 19.13 (127) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 7520)
Saturday, 30 April Perth 15.14 (104) def. by Claremont 17.18 (120) Lathlain Park (crowd: 4027)
Saturday, 30 April West Perth 19.15 (129) def. by East Fremantle 19.19 (133) Leederville Oval (crowd: 6839)
  • A superb opening quarter in front of a packed crowd turns an eagerly-awaited match into a procession. South Fremantle centreman Brad Hardie has 29 kicks and scores 5.5 (35).[19]
  • Allen Daniels proves the barrier to a huge upset by winless Perth, with six kicks in fifteen minutes of the final quarter after the Demons come within four points.[20]

Round 7Edit

Round 7
Saturday, 7 May West Perth 17.18 (120) def. Subiaco 9.19 (73) Leederville Oval (crowd: 6480)
Saturday, 7 May Swan Districts 17.25 (127) def. Perth 15.13 (103) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 6127) [21]
Saturday, 7 May Claremont 17.10 (112) def. South Fremantle 15.16 (106) Claremont Oval (crowd: 18268)
Saturday, 7 May East Perth 31.18 (204) def. East Fremantle 18.12 (120) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6813)
  • A record Claremont Oval crowd[22] sees claremoent win the battle of the unbeaten teams owing to some imaginative coaching from Graham Moss. The scoreline is misleading as South Fremantle were never within thirteen points between early in the first quarter and time-on in the last.[23]
  • After a "basketball-like" first quarter with sixteen goals scored,[24] East Perth – led by the unstoppable Ironmonger – take complete control for a record score against East Fremantle.[25]

Emu Export Lightning CupEdit

First roundEdit

Winning team Winning team score Losing team Losing team score Ground Crowd Date
East Fremantle 11.5 (71) East Perth 0.5 (5) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May
Perth 4.3 (27) Subiaco 1.5 (11) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May
East Perth 7.3 (45) West Perth 6.5 (41) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May
East Fremantle 9.6 (60) Claremont 5.5 (35) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May
South Fremantle 8.5 (53) Perth 5.0 (30) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May
Swan Districts 8.7 (55) Subiaco 6.2 (38) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May
Claremont 8.4 (52) West Perth 3.6 (24) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May
Swan Districts 6.8 (44) South Fremantle 1.7 (13) Subiaco Oval 7950 Saturday, 14 May

Second roundEdit

Winning team Winning team score Losing team Losing team score Ground Crowd Date
South Fremantle 6.5 (41) Subiaco 5.2 (32) Subiaco Oval 3870 Sunday, 15 May
Claremont 12.6 (78) East Perth 4.3 (27) Subiaco Oval 3870 Sunday, 15 May
East Fremantle 5.9 (39) West Perth 6.2 (38) Subiaco Oval 3870 Sunday, 15 May
Swan Districts 2.12 (24) Perth 2.7 (19) Subiaco Oval 3870 Sunday, 15 May

FinalEdit

Emu Export Loans Lightning Premiership Final
Sunday, 15 May East Fremantle 9.10 (64) def. Swan Districts 6.14 (50) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3870)

East Fremantle take their first title since 1979 in an experimental series regarded as a flop, with the crowd in dry weather less than half that observed in damp conditions the preceding day.[4]

Round 8Edit

Round 8
Saturday, 21 May South Fremantle 26.18 (174) def. Perth 12.18 (90) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6536)
Saturday, 21 May East Perth 19.18 (132) def. West Perth 10.9 (69) Perth Oval (crowd: 13343)
Saturday, 21 May Subiaco 18.10 (118) def. by East Fremantle 19.18 (132) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5027) [26]
Sunday, 22 May Claremont 24.17 (161) def. Swan Districts 18.19 (127) Claremont Oval (crowd: 6597)
  • Peter Dawson, aged twenty-four, and sixteen-year-old Richard Dennis emerge as a top wing duo as fierce tackling aids East Perth to dominate both the centreline and the Falcons.[27]
  • Warren Ralph’s 10.4 (64) wins a superb-quality Sunday game against a depleted Swan Districts team, led by strongman Ron Boucher, who picks off the "man of the match awards" but cannot by himself contain the Tigers.[28]

Round 9Edit

Round 9
Saturday, 28 May South Fremantle 22.16 (148) def. West Perth 16.16 (112) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 11420)
Saturday, 28 May Swan Districts 26.20 (176) def. East Perth 19.16 (130) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 13127)
Saturday, 28 May Perth 29.15 (189) def. Subiaco 19.7 (121) Lathlain Park (crowd: 4130) [29]
Saturday, 28 May East Fremantle 24.18 (162) def. Claremont 19.15 (129) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6813)
  • The "old firm" of Stephen Michael and Noel Carter – the latter now playing in the centre – drives South Fremantle to victory and top position with seven of the last nine goals after West Perth draw close.[30]
  • East Fremantle via sheer enthusiasm and pressure outplay the previously unbeaten Tigers in every department to issue a strong challenge to West Perth, East Perth and Swan Districts for a place in the four.[31]
  • In their first victory for the season, Perth kick their highest-ever score against Subiaco.[32]

Round 10 (Foundation Day)Edit

Round 10
Monday, 6 June West Perth 15.21 (111) def. by Swan Districts 16.18 (114) Leederville Oval (crowd: 11728)
Monday, 6 June East Perth 22.21 (153) def. Perth 10.12 (72) Perth Oval (crowd: 5840)
Monday, 6 June Subiaco 14.15 (99) def. by Claremont 24.10 (154) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4791)
Monday, 6 June East Fremantle 19.13 (127) def. by South Fremantle 18.20 (128) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 17560)
  • The move of Graeme Comerford from full-forward to centre half-forward, where he kicks 7.1 (43) against State star Murray Rance, would have brought the Falcons a crucial victory but for very poor kicking in front of goal.[33]
  • In the first one-point result in WAFL for three seasons,[34] East Fremantle, with seventeen fit players, just fail to hold off the pacesetters. Second-game future St. Kilda star Nicky Winmar kicks three decisive last-quarter goals.[35]

Round 11Edit

Round 11
Saturday, 11 June South Fremantle 26.29 (185) def. Subiaco 9.4 (58) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5950)
Saturday, 11 June Perth 21.14 (140) def. by West Perth 27.11 (173) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5009) [36]
Saturday, 11 June Claremont 13.9 (87) def. by East Perth 18.16 (124) Claremont Oval (crowd: 9837)
Saturday, 11 June Swan Districts 30.15 (195) def. East Fremantle 15.11 (101) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 10960)
  • East Perth produce a fine display against Claremont – avoiding the fadeouts that had plagued their previous games against the top three.[37]
  • Swan Districts kick a club record score against East Fremantle[38] with a completely dominant first half as their centreline of Leon Baker, Mike Smith and Phil Narkle completely dominates what the ABC called, in analogy with a partial solar eclipse in Perth, a "total eclipse of the Sharks".[39]
  • South Fremantle’s thrashing of Subiaco leads the Lions to sack coach Peter Daniel after only eleven games.[40] Replacement Brian Fairclough lasts only ten games himself.

Round 12Edit

Round 12
Saturday, 18 June Subiaco 12.19 (91) def. by Swan Districts 13.25 (103) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4423) [41]
Saturday, 18 June West Perth 9.14 (68) def. by Claremont 18.16 (124) Leederville Oval (crowd: 8275)
Saturday, 18 June Perth 18.16 (124) def. by East Fremantle 18.23 (131) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3670)
Sunday, 19 June South Fremantle 16.23 (119) def. East Perth 11.14 (80) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6583)

Rain and gloom late in the match seem to produce a lapse among the Perth players, who miss a rare win in a match where for three quarters East Fremantle were lucky to stay in striking distance.[42]

Round 13Edit

Round 13
Saturday, 25 June Swan Districts 18.19 (127) def. South Fremantle 10.15 (75) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 14760)
Saturday, 25 June Subiaco 20.7 (127) def. East Perth 15.11 (101) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4633)
Saturday, 25 June Claremont 22.16 (148) def. Perth 15.10 (100) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3771)
Saturday, 25 June East Fremantle 16.8 (104) def. West Perth 15.11 (101) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5810)
  • The reigning premiers achieve their best and most important victory of the season in slippery,[43] windy conditions as their pressure disorganises the dangerous Bulldog forwards.[44]
  • Clinton Brown, with ten goals in difficult conditions – one via a superb "wrong-side" shot from the boundary – leads Subiaco to their first win since 2 April, and leaves East Perth in the four only by percentage.[45]

Round 14Edit

Round 14
Saturday, 2 July Subiaco 17.10 (112) def. West Perth 15.18 (108) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 7060)
Saturday, 2 July Perth 17.14 (116) def. by Swan Districts 23.15 (153) Lathlain Park (crowd: 5697)
Saturday, 2 July South Fremantle 17.12 (114) def. Claremont 16.13 (109) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 13975)
Saturday, 2 July East Perth 17.16 (118) def. East Fremantle 15.20 (110) Perth Oval (crowd: 8137)
  • In the "best and toughest" match so far in 1983, South Fremantle gain a starling last-minute win over a depleted and inaccurate Claremont team.[46]
  • A thrilling contest filled with desperation and toughness leaves East Perth a game and 21.5 percent clear in fourth position as East Fremantle’s inaccuracy during a dominant third quarter proves critical.[47]
  • West Perth coach Dennis Cometti is left ruing a fourth straight loss that leaves his team two games out of the four. Subiaco’s spearheads – a major weakness in recent seasons – win for them as Clint Brown and Brain McFaull boot nine goals between them whereas the Falcons lack a dominant player in attack.[48]

Round 15Edit

Round 15
Saturday, 9 July Perth 12.12 (84) def. by South Fremantle 12.16 (88) Lathlain Park (crowd: 4359)
Saturday, 9 July West Perth 6.12 (48) def. by East Perth 17.12 (114) Leederville Oval (crowd: 7332)
Saturday, 9 July Swan Districts 14.10 (94) def. Claremont 8.16 (64) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 10183)
Saturday, 9 July East Fremantle 19.26 (140) def. Subiaco 8.11 (59) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4414) [49]
  • West Perth, who fail to goal after the fifteen-minute mark of the second quarter as future Collingwood star Michael Christian uses "spoiling" tactics to devastating effect,[50] are virtually out of the running with their tenth defeat in twelve matches.
  • The Falcons are the first WAFL team goalless for a half of football since East Fremantle in the second and third quarters in the penultimate round of 1981, and the first goalless in the second half since Swan Districts against East Perth in Round 19 of 1975.

State of Origin matchEdit

Western Australia vs Victoria
Tuesday, 12 July Western Australia def. Victoria Subiaco Oval (crowd: 44,213) [51]
5.6 (36)
6.13 (49)
11.19 (85)
 16.22 (118)
Q1
Q2
Q3
 Final
5.4 (34)
10.9 (69)
13.15 (93)
 16.19 (115)
Umpires: Michael Ball, Kevin Smith
Simpson Medal: Maurice Rioli
Buckenara 7.1
Taylor 2.4
Ralph 2.2
Sidebottom 1.3
Johnson 1.1
Richardson, Blackwell, Michael 1.0
Buhagiar 0.4
Rioli 0.2
Rance, Panizza, Bosustow 0.1
Goals 3.2 Wallace
3.1 Lee
2.1 Knights, Madden
1.1 Weightman, Daniher
1.0 Johnston, Royal, Watson, Flower
0.2 Tuck
0.1 Raines, Cunningham, Greene, Conlan

Western Australia win the title of Australian football champions and leave Victoria winless for the first time via a stirring comeback win led by seven-goal Hawthorn star Buckenara.

Round 16Edit

Round 16
Saturday, 16 July East Perth 14.15 (99) def. by Swan Districts 20.26 (146) Perth Oval (crowd: 13931)
Saturday, 16 July Subiaco 13.10 (88) def. by Perth 19.20 (134) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3903)
Saturday, 16 July Claremont 26.22 (178) def. East Fremantle 12.9 (81) Claremont Oval (crowd: 7963)
Sunday, 17 July South Fremantle 16.17 (113) def. West Perth 13.13 (91) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 8010) [52]

After ruckman Baden Harper adjusts his back brace, Claremont become unstoppable in a game thought by critics as tough for them to win, scoring 20.7 (127) after half-time despite rain in the final quarter.[53]

Round 17Edit

Round 17
Saturday, 23 July Subiaco 14.15 (99) def. by South Fremantle 27.18 (180) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4727)
Saturday, 23 July West Perth 12.14 (86) def. Perth 11.17 (83) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4935)
Saturday, 23 July East Perth 8.7 (55) def. by Claremont 20.19 (139) Perth Oval (crowd: 9436)
Saturday, 23 July East Fremantle 8.8 (56) def. by Swan Districts 13.22 (100) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 7810)
  • Swan Districts win their ninth consecutive match with a relentless display into a northerly gale during the first quarter and three brilliant long goals after the Sharks looked like holding them out during most of the second stanza.[54]
  • Claremont’s remarkable tally of 166 handballs – 21 from Wayne Blackwell – bewilders East Perth in the very windy conditions and shows severe weaknesses in the Royals’ running game.[55]

Round 18Edit

Round 18
Saturday, 30 July Perth 21.16 (142) def. East Perth 17.9 (111) Lathlain Park (crowd: 5237)
Saturday, 30 July Claremont 37.19 (241) def. Subiaco 11.9 (75) Claremont Oval (crowd: 4210) [56]
Saturday, 30 July South Fremantle 21.22 (148) def. East Fremantle 11.10 (76) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 12730)
Sunday, 31 July Swan Districts 18.19 (127) def. West Perth 15.14 (104) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 9211)
  • Swan Districts record their tenth consecutive victory against an inspired West Perth in Les Fong’s two hundredth match. The Falcons match the pacesetters for three quarters before Swans’ greater class decides.[57]
  • Warren Ralph kicks sixteen goals, two behinds – the most goals in a WA(N)FL match since Bernie Naylor’s record 23-goal haul in 1953 against Subiaco[58] – for Claremont as the Tigers just fail to break their record for the highest WAFL first quarter and match scores.[59]
  • Perth produce their first win against a team other than Subiaco since the corresponding round of 1981 by beating East Perth at that club’s own game of strength and persistence. Cousins, Yorgey and Cam Shepard dominate for the Demons.[60]

Round 19Edit

Round 19
Saturday, 6 August Swan Districts 26.22 (178) def. Subiaco 5.8 (38) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3980) [61]
Saturday, 6 August East Perth 15.11 (101) def. by South Fremantle 24.11 (155) Perth Oval (crowd: 8818)
Saturday, 6 August Claremont 26.13 (169) def. West Perth 16.13 (109) Claremont Oval (crowd: 6858)
Saturday, 6 August East Fremantle 21.20 (146) def. Perth 15.21 (111) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5052)
  • East Perth president Mal Atwell protests at Mal Brown’s spitting on an East Perth member after an incident during the opening quarter between Bulldog Stephen Michael and Royal David Morgan.[62]
  • Subiaco, thrashed by Swans, kick the lowest score in the WAFL since 1980, and in fact the lowest by any visiting team at Bassendean until Peel kicked 4.6 (30) in Round 12 of 2003.[63]

Round 20Edit

Round 20
Saturday, 13 August South Fremantle 18.25 (133) def. Swan Districts 11.23 (89) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 15290)
Saturday, 13 August East Perth 22.18 (150) def. Subiaco 9.12 (66) Perth Oval (crowd: 3257)
Saturday, 13 August Perth 8.15 (63) def. by Claremont 21.17 (143) Lathlain Park (crowd: 3800)
Saturday, 13 August West Perth 11.13 (79) def. by East Fremantle 16.17 (113) Leederville Oval (crowd: 6375)
  • An influenza epidemic depletes Swan Districts and the Bulldogs finish their home season unbeaten despite having one goal and fourteen behinds on the board at one stage of the second quarter – they compensated with eight straight goals into the wind during the final stanza.[64]
  • Despite being without skipper Alexander, Kevin Taylor and Rod Lester-Smith, East Fremantle gained a third and most critical win over West Perth to set up a last-round "mini-elimination final" with perennial finalists East Perth.[65]

Round 21Edit

Round 21
Saturday, 20 August Subiaco 15.15 (105) def. by West Perth 16.20 (116) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3320)
Saturday, 20 August Swan Districts 25.21 (171) def. Perth 14.8 (92) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 4217)
Saturday, 20 August Claremont 21.12 (138) def. South Fremantle 15.19 (109) Claremont Oval (crowd: 13810)
Saturday, 20 August East Fremantle 19.16 (130) def. East Perth 12.9 (81) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 14924)
  • Skill and enthusiasm – compared by football writers with a similar win against West Perth in the final round of 1961 – allow East Fremantle to enter the top four for the first time in 1983. Shane Ellis is unbeatable for the Sharks in defence.[66]
  • Claremont’s greater speed ensures a comfortable win in the second semi-final preview and createst sizeable worries for a South Fremantle team that previously felt itself coasting towards a premiership.[67]
  • East Perth fails to qualify for the finals for the first time since 1974 and only the second since 1965. In the process East Fremantle break their first run of ten consecutive losses against one opponent since 1909 and only their second ever.[68]

LadderEdit

1983 ladder
Pos Team Pld W L D PF PA PP Pts
1 South Fremantle 21 18 3 0 2922 2070 141.2 72
2 Claremont 21 17 4 0 2985 2061 144.8 68
3 Swan Districts (P) 21 16 5 0 2758 2260 122.0 64
4 East Fremantle 21 10 11 0 2340 2690 87.0 40
5 East Perth 21 9 12 0 2477 2522 98.2 36
6 West Perth 21 7 14 0 2230 2452 90.9 28
7 Subiaco 21 4 17 0 1987 2986 66.5 16
8 Perth 21 3 18 0 2168 2826 76.7 12
Source: WAFL Footy Facts
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) percentage; 3) number of points for.
(P) Premiers

FinalsEdit

First semi-finalEdit

First semi-final
Saturday, 27 August Swan Districts 21.25 (151) def. East Fremantle 13.14 (92) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 23,345) [69]

East Fremantle, who finished six games behind the top three and were without Kevin Taylor and first-year future West Coast star Michael Brennan,[70] were never in the hunt after kicking into the breeze upon winning the toss in what turned out a "forgettable" match.

Second semi-finalEdit

Second semi-final
Saturday, 3 September South Fremantle 14.26 (110) def. by Claremont 20.11 (131) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 22,947) [71]
  • South’s inaccuracy – going from 4.2 (26) to 4.14 (38) during the second quarter – ruins a superb comeback in wet[72] and windy conditions after half-time.
  • The Bulldogs reduced a sixty-six point deficit to ten points before Claremont steady. South had more possession but wasted chances despite Bruce Monteath kicking 6.7 (43) in a superb display at full-forward.

Preliminary finalEdit

Preliminary final
Saturday, 10 September South Fremantle 15.11 (101) def. by Swan Districts 26.19 (175) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 33,585) [73]

Swan Districts produced a flawless team display to thrash a South Fremantle team whose lack of pace tells under the pressure on a warm day. It was the Swans’ first-ever finals win over South Fremantle.

Grand FinalEdit

1983 WAFL Grand Final
Saturday, 17 September Claremont def. by Swan Districts Subiaco Oval (crowd: 47,760) [74]
1.5 (11)
5.7 (37)
9.8 (62)
 12.11 (83)
Q1
Q2
Q3
 Final
3.3 (21)
9.6 (60)
13.12 (90)
 15.14 (104)
Umpires: Mike Ball, David Rowe
Simpson Medal: Brad Shine (Swan Districts)
Ralph 3, Larry Kickett, Burns, Blackwell, Brett Farmer, Mitchell, Malaxos, Daniel, Watson, Pearce Goals Sartori 3, Baker 2, Shine 2, Holmes 2, Cransberg, Langsford, Skwrowski, Smith, Nowotny, Phil Narkle
Moss, Aitken, Michael O'Connell, Kickett, Watson, Reynolds Best Sartori, Langsford, Shine, Rance, Skwrowski, Cransberg, Solin, Phil Narkle

Swans produce another fine team effort to win their second consecutive premiership and send retiring veteran Stan Nowotny out on a high note.

NotesEdit

a Cousins lost on a countback, but was awarded a retrospective Medal in 1997.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Alexander to Think It Over’; The West Australian, 22 August 1983, pp. 84, 80
  2. ^ See Barker, Anthony J.; Behind the Play: A History of Football in Western Australia. ISBN 0975242709
  3. ^ a b Young, Doug; ‘Subiaco’s Victory Looks Ominous’; The West Australian, 28 March 1983, p. 69
  4. ^ a b Christian, Geoff; ‘No, Say the Fans’; The West Australian, 16 May 1983, pp. 72, 67
  5. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Telecasts Should Be Reviewed’; The West Australian, 20 June 1983, p. 84
  6. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Falcons Rally Under Pressure’; The West Australian, 28 March 1983, pp. 72, 68
  7. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Tigers’ Planning Pays Dividends’; The West Australian, 28 March 1983, p. 68
  8. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Royals Bring Out Best in Swans’; The West Australian, 4 April 1983, pp. 72, 71
  9. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Subiaco Are Ready for Next Challenge’; The West Australian, 4 April 1983, p. 64
  10. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Hurdle too High for East Perth’; The West Australian, 11 April 1983, p. 68
  11. ^ Young, Doug; ‘The Signs Were There’; The West Australian, 11 April 1983, p. 68
  12. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘South Open the Floodgates’; The West Australian, 11 April 1983, p. 60
  13. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘South Sink the Sharks, Move to Top’; The West Australian, 18 April 1983, p. 88
  14. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘No Pay for the Humbled Swans’; The West Australian, 18 April 1983, p. 88
  15. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘So Near, Yet So Far for Subiaco’; The West Australian, 18 April 1983, p. 88
  16. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Sharks Think Positively’; The West Australian, 25 April 1983, p. 54
  17. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘South Start and Finish Strongly’; The West Australian, 25 April 1983, p. 54
  18. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Claremont Defence Earns Star Billing’; The West Australian, 25 April 1983, p. 54
  19. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘South’s Early Blitz Sinks the Swans’; The West Australian, 2 May 1983, p. 64
  20. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Daniels Repels Perth Challenge’; The West Australian, 2 May 1983, p. 64
  21. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Blackaby Makes Stylish Return’; The West Australian, 9 May 1983, p. 67
  22. ^ "West Australian Football League: Biggest Home-and-Away Crowds". Archived from the original on 24 December 2013. Retrieved 31 December 2013.
  23. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Claremont Victory a Tactical Triumph’; The West Australian, 9 May 1983, p. 65
  24. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Magro Overcomes Series of Setbacks’; The West Australian, 9 May 1983, p. 66
  25. ^ "WAFL Footy Facts: East Perth v East Fremantle". Archived from the original on 14 May 2014. Retrieved 3 June 2014.
  26. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Early Blitz Sinks Lions’; The West Australian, 23 May 1983, p. 58
  27. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘East Perth Wingers Emerge as Stars’; The West Australian, 23 May 1983, p. 58
  28. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Tigers in Thriller: Ralph Is the Hero’; The West Australian, 23 May 1983, pp. 64, 58
  29. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Perth’s Forwards More Purposeful’; The West Australian, 30 May 1983, p. 65
  30. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Michael, Carter to the Fore Again’; The West Australian, 30 May 1983, p. 64
  31. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Aggressive Sharks Tame the Tigers’; The West Australian, 30 May 1983, p. 64
  32. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Perth v Subiaco
  33. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Swans Swoop in a Thriller’; The West Australian, 7 June 1983, p. 91
  34. ^ "WAFL Footy Facts: All Teams – 1-Point Winning Margins". Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 4 June 2014.
  35. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Last-kick Thriller in Derby’; The West Australian, 7 June 1983, pp. 92, 90
  36. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Duckworth Cuts Loose’; The West Australian, 13 June 1983, p. 56
  37. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘East Perth Will Be Hard to Shift’; The West Australian, 13 June 1983, pp. 61, 56
  38. ^ "WAFL Footy Facts: Swan Districts v East Fremantle". Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 4 June 2014.
  39. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Shadow Cast Over Sharks’; The West Australian, 13 June 1983, p. 57
  40. ^ History Timeline: Subiaco Football Club
  41. ^ Young, Doug; ‘Lions’ Rally Predictable’; The West Australian, 20 June 1983, p. 57
  42. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Perth’s Lapse Proves Costly’; The West Australian, 13 June 1983, p. 57
  43. ^ See Perth Regional Office (009034) June 1983 rainfall
  44. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Swans Knock South off the Rails’; The West Australian, 27 June 1983, p. 60
  45. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Subiaco’s Taste of Glory’; The West Australian, 27 June 1983, p. 60
  46. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘South Snatch All the Spoils’; The West Australian, 4 July 1983, p. 64
  47. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘There’s Nothing Between Easts’; The West Australian, 4 July 1983, p. 65
  48. ^ Young, Doug; ‘Close, Yet So Far’; The West Australian, 4 July 1983, p. 65
  49. ^ Young, Doug; ‘Taylor Worthy of a Medal’; The West Australian, 11 July 1983, p. 93
  50. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Falcons’ Fans Go into Mourning’; The West Australian, 11 July 1983, p. 92
  51. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘WA Football’s Day to Remember’; The West Australian, 13 July 1983, p. 112
  52. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Low-Key South Do Just Enough’; The West Australian, 18 July 1983, pp. 68, 64
  53. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Claremont Find Their Sparkle’; The West Australian, 18 July 1983, p. 65
  54. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Swans Simply Too Resolute’; The West Australian, 25 July 1983, p. 64
  55. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Claremont Make Handball Tell’; The West Australian, 25 July 1983, p. 64
  56. ^ Wright, Steve; ‘Claremont Were Simply Brilliant’; The West Australian, 1 August 1983, p. 64
  57. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Swans Rally Tames Spirited Falcons’; The West Australian, 1 August 1983, pp. 68, 65
  58. ^ ‘Best Since Naylor’; The West Australian, 1 August 1983, p. 64
  59. ^ "WAFL Footy Facts: Claremont v Subiaco, Round 18, 1983". Archived from the original on 22 September 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2013.
  60. ^ Wainwright, Robert; ‘Perth Fans Relish Taste of Victory’; The West Australian, 1 August 1983, p. 64
  61. ^ Young, Doug; ‘Subiaco at Rock Bottom’; The West Australian, 8 August 1983, p. 73
  62. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Spitting Incident: Royals Want an Apology’; The West Australian, 8 August 1983, p. 76
  63. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Bassendean Oval Archived September 21, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  64. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Carter, Matera Show the Way’; The West Australian, 15 August 1983, p. 76
  65. ^ Young, Doug; ‘Fields Shines in the Centre’; The West Australian, 15 August 1983, p. 76
  66. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘East Fremantle Spirit Lives On’; The West Australian, 22 August 1983, p. 80
  67. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Claremont Spirit Lives On’; The West Australian, 22 August 1983, p. 80
  68. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: East Fremantle – Most Consecutive Losses v Each Opponent
  69. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Real Battle Starts This Week’; The West Australian, 29 August 1983, pp. 72, 68
  70. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Sharks Can Look to Rosy Future’; The West Australian, 29 August 1983, p. 69
  71. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Moss Sets the Standard for Stirring Victory’; The West Australian, 5 September 1983, p. 80
  72. ^ Perth Regional Office (009034) September 1983 rainfall
  73. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Swans Get into Top Gear’; The West Australian, 12 September 1983, p. 88
  74. ^ Christian, Geoff; ‘Swans Get It Right’; The West Australian, 19 September 1983, pp. 76, 72

External linksEdit