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1979 SCCA/CART Indy Car Series

  (Redirected from 1979 IndyCar season)

The 1979 SCCA/CART Indy Car Series was the inaugural season for the CART Indy car series. It was the first national championship season of American open wheel racing sanctioned by CART. The season consisted of 14 races. Rick Mears was the national champion, and the rookie of the year was Bill Alsup. The 1979 Indianapolis 500 was sanctioned by USAC, but counted towards the CART points championship. Rick Mears won the Indy 500, his first of four victories in the event.

1979 CART season
SCCA/CART Indy Car Series
The original CART logo.jpg
1979 IndyCar season
Season
Races14
Start dateMarch 11
End dateOctober 20
Awards
Drivers' championUnited States Rick Mears
Constructors' CupUnited States Penske
Manufacturers' CupUnited Kingdom Cosworth
Nations' CupUnited States United States
Rookie of the YearUnited States Bill Alsup
Indianapolis 500 winnerUnited States Rick Mears
← 1978 (USAC)
1980 →

The 1979 season was filled with controversy on and off the track. During the offseason, several Indy car owners broke off from USAC, and formed Championship Auto Racing Teams, a new sanctioning body to govern the sport of open wheel Indy car racing. USAC continued to sanction their Gold Crown Championship, resulting in two parallel national championships for 1979. The controversy over the first "split" in Indy car racing came to its first climax at the 1979 Indianapolis 500, when USAC rejected entries by certain CART owners. The owners won a court injunction to be allowed to race, and later, another controversy erupted, this time involving illegal wastegate exhaust pipes.

The 1979 CART season was held through an arrangement such that it fell under the sanctioning umbrella of SCCA. This one-year, temporary arrangement was such that it would be formally recognized by ACCUS.

With three wins, two poles, and 14 top tens (no finish worse than 7th), Rick Mears ran away with the inaugural CART championship title. Mears took a large points lead after winning the Indy 500, and never relinquished the top spot through the remainder of the season. Bobby Unser won six races, and finished second in points.

USAC/CART "Split"Edit

For more information, see 1979 Indianapolis 500 § Controversies

Drivers and constructorsEdit

The following teams and drivers competed for the 1979 CART World Series.

Team/Car Owner Chassis Engine # Driver(s) Races
  Jerry O'Connell Racing McLaren Cosworth 1   Tom Sneva All
32   Johnny Parsons 11
  Chaparral Cars Lola (1-3)
Chaparral

(4-14)

Cosworth 2   Al Unser All
  Team McLaren McLaren Cosworth 4   Johnny Rutherford All
  Bob Fletcher Racing Lightning Cosworth 7   Steve Krisiloff 1-10
55   Spike Gehlhausen 11-14
  Team Penske Penske Cosworth 9   Rick Mears All
12   Bobby Unser All
68   Bill Alsup 4
99   Mario Andretti 11-12
  Morales Motorsports Lightning Offenhauser (2-3)
Cosworth (1, 4-14)
10   Pancho Carter All
Offenhauser 15   Bob Harkey 11
  Longhorn Racing Penske Cosworth 11   Tom Bagley 1-12, 14
71   Steve Krisiloff 11
  Gilmore Racing Parnelli Cosworth 14   A. J. Foyt 4
  Lindsey Hopkins Racing Lightning DGS 15   Johnny Parsons 4
Offenhauser 51   Hurley Haywood 4
  Vollstedt Enterprises Vollstedt Offenhauser 17   Dick Simon 4
  Frantz Racing Wildcat DGS (1-2, 4-5, 7-9, 12)
Offenhauser (10-11)
18 (16)   Tom Frantz 1-2, 4, 7-12
  Bill Henderson 5
  Gehlhausen Racing Eagle (1-3, 5-11)
Wildcat (4)
Offenhauser (1-3, 5-11)

Cosworth (4)

19   Spike Gehlhausen 1-10
  Phil Caliva 11
Eagle Offenhauser 39   Al Loquasto 4, 7-8
  Patrick Racing Penske Cosworth 20 (3)   Gordon Johncock All
Penske (4-13)
Wildcat (1, 14)
Lightning (2-3)
40 (6)   Wally Dallenbach All
Penske 60   Roger Mears 11
  Steve Krisiloff 12
  Rhoades Competition McLaren Offenhauser 20   John Martin 4
  Conqueste Racing Team Parnelli Cosworth 21 (89)   Lee Kunzman 1-8, 11
  Leader Card Racing Watson Offenhauser 22   Billy Vukovich II 4
24   Sheldon Kinser 4
40   George Snider 4
  McElreath Racing Penske
Cosworth 23   Jim McElreath 4
Eagle Offenhauser 26   Tony Bettenhausen, Jr. 4
  Interscope Racing Parnelli Cosworth 25   Danny Ongais All
  Wheel Center Eagle Offenhauser 28   Billy Scott 4, 11
  Hucul Racing McLaren Offenhauser 29   Cliff Hucul 4
  Thunder Racing McLaren Offenhauser 30   Dana Carter 4
  John Martin 11
  Wysard Racing Wildcat Offenhauser 34   Vern Schuppan 1-4, 7, 9-12, 14
  S&M Electric Lightning Offenhauser 35 (31)   Larry Rice 1-6
  Tim Richmond 9-11, 14
  Medlin Racing Cicada Offenhauser 35   Bill Puterbaugh 4
  All American Racers Eagle Cosworth 36   Mike Mosley All
  Karl Racing McLaren Offenhauser 38   Jerry Karl 4
  WASP Racing McLaren Offenhauser 41 (67)   Bill Alsup All
  Mergard Racing Eagle Offenhauser 42   Herm Johnson 13-14
  AMI Racing Lola Cosworth 44   Tom Bigelow 4
Lola Cosworth 45   Janet Guthrie 4
Wildcat DGS 46   Howdy Holmes 4
  BFM Enterprises Antares (4)
Manta (13)
Offenhauser 50   Eldon Rasmussen 4
  Frank Weiss 13
  Hurtubise Racing Unknown Chevrolet 52   Woody Fisher 4
Mallard Offenhauser 56   Jim Hurtubise 4
  Crower Cams Eagle Chevrolet 57   Jerry Sneva 4
  Hoffman Racing Lightning

(4, 7-8, 11)Penske (14)

Offenhauser

(4, 7-8, 11) Cosworth (14)

59   George Snider 4
  Joe Saldana 7-8, 11
  Dick Ferguson 14
Eagle Offenhauser 69   Joe Saldana
  Al Loquasto
1-6, 9-10, 12
  Al Loquasto 11
Eagle (11, 13, 14)

Spyder (7-8)

79   Dick Ferguson 7-8
  Cliff Hucul 11
  Joe Saldana 13-14
  Bob Olmstead's V12 Eagle Volker 62   Ed Finley 4
  Rager Racing Eagle Chevrolet 66   Roger Rager 4
  Mach I Racing Eagle Offenhauser 69   Tim Richmond 7
  Hodgdon Racing McLaren Cosworth 72   Roger McCluskey 4
  Jerry Sneva 11
Spirit AMC 73   Jerry Sneva 4
  Gibson Racing Eagle Offenhauser 75   Todd Gibson 4
  Walmotor McLaren (1)

Penske (2-4, 7-8, 11-12)

Cosworth 77   Salt Walther 1-4, 7-8, 11-12
  R.P. Racing Penske Cosworth 80   Larry Dickson 4
  Woodward Racing Eagle Offenhauser 81   Dick Ferguson 4
  Beaudoin Racing Wildcat DGS 83   Billy Engelhart 4
  AMSoil Lola Cosworth 86   Dennis Firestone 11
  Intercomp Eagle (1, 2, 4, 7-9)
Bear (5-6)
Offenhauser (1, 2, 4, 7-9)
DGS (5-6)
92   John Mahler 1-2, 4-9
  O'Hanlon Racing March Chevrolet 93   Larry McCoy 4
  Whittington Bros. Racing McLaren Cosworth 94   Don Whittington 11
Parnelli 98   Bill Whittington 11
  Cannon Racing Wildcat DGS (7)
Offenhauser (4, 10-14)
95   Larry Cannon 4, 7, 10-14
  Agajanian-Grant King Racers King Chevrolet 97   Phil Threshie 4
Offenhauser 98   Gary Bettenhausen 4
  Canavan Racing McLaren Offenhauser X   Earle Canavan 4

Season summaryEdit

ScheduleEdit

Rd Date Name Circuit Location
1 March 11 Arizona Republic/Jimmy Bryan 150  O  Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Arizona
2 April 22 Gould Twin Dixie 125  O  Atlanta Motor Speedway Hampton, Georgia
3
4 May 27 Indianapolis 500  O  Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis, Indiana
5 June 10 Trenton Twin Indy  O  Trenton Speedway Trenton, New Jersey
6
7 July 15 Norton Twin 125  O  Michigan International Speedway Brooklyn, Michigan
8
July 29 Cancelled  R  Mosport International Raceway Bowmanville, Ontario
9 August 5 Kent Oil 150  R  Watkins Glen International Watkins Glen, New York
10 August 19 Ditzler 150  O  Trenton Speedway Trenton, New Jersey
August 26 Cancelled  O  North Carolina Motor Speedway Rockingham, North Carolina
11 September 2 California 500  O  Ontario Motor Speedway Ontario, California
12 September 15 Gould Grand Prix  O  Michigan International Speedway Brooklyn, Michigan
13 September 30 Rich's Atlanta Classic  O  Atlanta Motor Speedway Hampton, Georgia
14 October 20 Miller High Life 150  O  Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Arizona

The California 500 at Ontario Motor Speedway was originally scheduled as a USAC race for September 2, but was switched mid-season to a CART series race. Additional races at Mosport and Rockingham were ultimately cancelled.[1]

O Oval/Speedway
R Road Course/Street Circuit

Race summariesEdit

Race 1: Arizona Republic/Jimmy Bryan 150

Races 2 and 3: Gould Twin Dixie 125

Race 4: Indianapolis 500

Races 5 and 6: Trenton Twin Indy

Races 7 and 8: Norton Twin 125s

In the first race, Bobby Unser won the pole, followed by Al Unser, Gordon Johncock, Wally Dallenbach, and Rick Mears. Johncock jumped out to lead the first three laps, but Bobby Unser fought back and led until the first caution flew on lap 11 for Spike Gehlhausen's stalled car. Lee Kunzman stayed out under the caution and took the lead, while Bobby Unser's engine blew on lap 21. [2] Al Unser would pick up the lead after the caution flew for Danny Ongais spinning, but he miscalculated fuel mileage and ran out of fuel with 17 laps to go.[2] This allowed Gordon Johncock to take the lead and win. Mike Mosley finished second, Johnny Rutherford third, Rick Mears fourth and Wally Dallenbach fifth. 11 laps into the race, Tom Sneva encountered a fire in his pits, but no one was hurt.

Before the second race, Bobby Unser's crew installed a new engine. [3] Mike Mosley led the first lap, but he had fuel pump problems the next lap and dropped out. Throughout the next 25 laps, Johnny Rutherford and Rick Mears would trade the lead, before Unser charged to the front on lap 28 and never looked back, winning the race. Rick Mears finished second on track, but he was penalized for passing cars under the yellow, dropping him to fifth. [4] Tom Sneva moved to second, Al Unser to third, and Gordon Johncock to fourth. Two cautions flew, the first for John Mahler's stalled car on lap 23 and the second for a crash involving Danny Ongais on lap 40.

Following the second of the two races, Rick Mears was leading the points with a 460 point lead over Gordon Johncock. Bobby Unser was third, 470 points back, Johnny Rutherford fourth, 925 points back, and Mike Mosley rounded out the top 5, 960 points back.

Race 9: Kent Oil 150

Al Unser won the pole, with Bobby Unser, Danny Ongais, Rick Mears and Gordon Johncock making up the rest of the top five. In the race, Al and Bobby Unser dominated, the two brothers being the only ones to lead laps throughout the day. Bobby Unser took the lead for good after Al had transmission problems on lap 48,[5] and led the rest of the race to win over Rick Mears. Gordon Johncock finished third, Danny Ongais fourth, and Al Unser fell to fifth.

With his win, Bobby Unser rose to second in points, 410 points behind Rick Mears. Gordon Johncock fell to third, 490 points back, Johnny Rutherford was in fourth, 1157 points back after dropping out with a blown engine, and Mike Mosley remained in fifth, falling to 1185 points behind after dropping out with a broken gearbox.

Race 10: Ditzler 150

Bobby Unser won the pole, with Gordon Johncock, Tom Sneva, Danny Ongais, and Rick Mears making up the rest of the top five.

The race was postponed over a week due to rain. When the race did run, except for one lap led by Bill Alsup, Unser, Sneva, and Mears were the only ones to lead the race. Bobby Unser led the first 20 laps, before giving the lead to Mears. Tom Sneva then led at lap 57, followed by Unser regaining the lead on lap 69. Unser made a pit stop with 14 laps to go, giving the lead back to Sneva. [6] Rick Mears gambled on pit strategy, [7] and passed Tom Sneva with just 3 laps to go to win. Bobby Unser also passed him, taking advantage of Sneva's fading tires to finish second. [6] Sneva fell to third, Wally Dallenbach finished fourth after running as high as second before an extended pit stop,[6] and Johnny Rutherford finished fifth. Two cautions slowed the race, both for crashes. One was by Gordon Johncock on lap 5, and the other by Mike Mosley on lap 36.

Rick Mears extended his point lead to 470 points over Bobby Unser. Gordon Johncock remained in third, 782 points back, Johnny Rutherford stayed in fourth, 1307 points back, and Al Unser rose to fifth in points, 1450 points behind.

Race 11: California 500

Rick Mears qualified on the pole, followed by Al Unser, Bobby Unser, Mario Andretti, in a one-off appearance for Penske, and Tom Sneva.

In the race, Al Unser led most of the first half of the race, but lost three laps due to a broken front-spoiler bracket.[8] For the remainder of the race, Bobby Unser and Rick Mears traded the lead, While leading on lap 164, Rick Mears killed the engine on his pit stop, causing him to lose 12 seconds to Bobby Unser.[8] This allowed Unser to lead most of the remaining laps, and won over Rick Mears. Mario Andretti claimed third despite running out of gas at the end, Johnny Rutherford finished fourth, and Al Unser ended up in fifth.

His win allowed Unser to close up to 270 points behind Mears, with Johnny Rutherford rising to third in points, Gordon Johncock falling to fourth, and Al Unser remaining in fifth. Apart from Mears, all other drivers were mathematically eliminated from the championship.

Race 12: Gould Grand Prix

Bobby Unser claimed the pole, his fourth of the season, with Rick Mears starting second, Gordon Johncock starting third, Johnny Rutherford starting fourth, and Al Unser rounding out the top five.

In the race, Gordon Johncock dominated the early stages of the race, before his engine blew while leading on the 36th lap. [9] This allowed Bobby Unser to take the lead, and hold it the rest of the way to win over Tom Sneva. Rick Mears was third despite running out of gas on the final lap, Johnny Rutherford finished fourth, and Tom Bagley was fifth. The win was the fifth straight for Team Penske.

Bobby Unser was now just 180 points behind Mears in the fight, followed by Rutherford, Johncock, and Al Unser.

Race 13: Rich's Atlanta Classic

Bobby Unser claimed his fifth pole of the year, followed by Rick Mears, Al Unser, Danny Ongais, and Johnny Rutherford.

In the race, Unser dominated the first half of the race, but while leading on lap 55 suffered a blown tire[10] handing the lead to Johnny Rutherford. But with 25 laps remaining in the race, Rutherford's engine blew, which allowed Rick Mears to cruise to an easy victory. Gordon Johncock placed second, despite running out of gas on the final lap, Bobby Unser wound up third, Wally Dallenbach finished fourth, and Al Unser, who had tire problems of his own,[10] finished fifth. The win was Penske's sixth straight.

The win gave Rick Mears a near-insurmountable 270 point lead in the points, which meant that he would win the championship as long as he finished 11th or better in the final round.

Race 14: Miller High Life 150

For the last race of the year, Bobby Unser won another pole, his sixth of the year. Al Unser started second, Wally Dallenbach in third, Rick Mears in fourth, and Tom Sneva in fifth.

In the race, Al Unser jumped out to the lead on the first lap. He would eventually dominate the race, leading 138 of the 150 laps and only giving up the lead for a pair of pit stops. [11] There were two late-race cautions, one when Wally Dallenbach spun with 9 laps to go, and one when Pancho Carter lost a wheel, which led to a two-lap shootout[12] but Unser pulled away en route to his first and only win of the year, snapping a six-race Penske streak. Bobby Unser claimed second, Rick Mears third, Gordon Johncock fourth, and Tom Sneva fifth.

Mears's third was enough for him to claim the inaugural CART championship, winning by 240 points over Bobby Unser. Gordon Johncock finished third in points, with Johnny Rutherford in fourth and Al Unser in fifth.

Race resultsEdit

Rd Race Pole Position Winning driver Winning team Race Time Report
1 Arizona Republic / Jimmy Bryan 150   Bobby Unser   Gordon Johncock Patrick Racing 1:15:23 Report
2 Gould Twin Dixie 125   Johnny Rutherford   Johnny Rutherford Team McLaren 0:47:28 Report
3   Johnny Rutherford Team McLaren 0:45:40
4 Indianapolis 500   Rick Mears   Rick Mears Team Penske 3:08:27 Report
5 Trenton Twin Indy   Gordon Johncock   Bobby Unser Team Penske 0:46:30 Report
6   Bobby Unser Team Penske 0:40:46
7 Norton Twin 125   Bobby Unser   Gordon Johncock Patrick Racing 0:44:13 Report
8   Bobby Unser Team Penske 0:48:40
9 Kent Oil 150   Al Unser   Bobby Unser Team Penske 1:14:42 Report
10 Ditzler 150   Bobby Unser   Rick Mears Team Penske 1:09:20 Report
11 California 500   Rick Mears   Bobby Unser Team Penske 3:24:22 Report
12 Gould Grand Prix   Bobby Unser   Bobby Unser Team Penske 0:51:22 Report
13 Rich's Atlanta Classic   Bobby Unser   Rick Mears Team Penske 0:50:09 Report
14 Miller High Life 150   Bobby Unser   Al Unser Chaparral Cars 1:13:03 Report
  • CART was sanctioned by the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA)
  • Indianapolis was USAC-sanctioned but counted towards the CART championship.

Final driver standingsEdit

Note: Non-CART members in CART events haven't points in officially: Don Whittington, Jr., Bill Whittington, Roger Mears, John Martin, Frank Weiss, Bob Harkey, Dennis Firestone, Johnny Parsons, Jr. and Cliff Hucul

Pos Driver PHX
 
ATL
 
INDY
 
TRT
 
MIC
 
WGL
 
TRT
 
ONT
 
MIC
 
ATL
 
PHX
 
Pts
1   Rick Mears 2 5 2 1 5 7 4 5 2 1 2 3 1 3 4,060
2   Bobby Unser 5 7 4 5 1 1 19 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 3,820
3   Gordon Johncock 1 4 9 6 3 5 1 4 3 16 15 13 2 4 2,211
4   Johnny Rutherford 3 1 1 18 15 3 3 11 15 5 4 4 11 6 2,163
5   Al Unser 4 6 3 22 2 12 13 3 5 6 5 10 5 1 2,085
6   Danny Ongais 15 14 6 4 7 6 18 12 4 13 6 DNQ 15 17 1,473
7   Tom Sneva 17 3 5 15 6 15 21 2 10 3 17 2 8 5 1,360
8   Tom Bagley 8 8 7 9 8 4 6 6 6 7 32 5 9 1,208
9   Wally Dallenbach 7 11 8 27 4 2 5 10 14 4 24 6 4 12 1,149
10   Mike Mosley 6 17 17 3 13 DNS 2 20 12 14 34 14 10 1,126
11   Mario Andretti 3 DNQ 700
12   Lee Kunzman 9 2 18 30 14 DNS 14 17 9 490
13   Pancho Carter 20 9 11 20 10 8 7 14 16 DNQ 28 8 13 7 452
14   Vern Schuppan 21 12 12 21 16 DNS 7 7 DNS 14 449
15   Bill Alsup  RY  11 16 15 DNQ 12 9 9 13 9 10 22 9 10 11 400
16   Joe Saldana 13 13 13 16 17 16 10 8 13 8 30 DNQ 6 18 368
17   Spike Gehlhausen 18 18 16 10 18 13 22 21 17 11 25 11 16 8 343
18   Salt Walther 12 10 10 12 8 7 20 12 314
19   Steve Krisiloff 16 15 DNS 11 9 14 17 18 18 23 6 279
20   Tom Frantz 14 DNQ 11 16 11 9 11 14 236
21   Jerry Sneva 31 10 155
22   Tim Richmond  R  23 DNS 8 12 26 15 112
23   Larry Rice 10 14 19 16 10 105
24   Herm Johnson 7 13 98
25   John Mahler 19 25 11 11 12 15 74
26   Al Loquasto DNQ 20 9 21 70
27   Larry Cannon DNQ 15 14 DNS 12 16 56
28   Dick Ferguson DNQ 15 19 16 DNQ 35
29   Billy Scott DNQ 19 20
30   Phil Caliva  R  27 10
-   A. J. Foyt 2 -
-   Howdy Holmes  R  7 -
-   Billy Vukovich II 8 -
-   Don Whittington, Jr.  R  8 -
-   Frank Weiss DNQ 9 -
-   Bill Whittington  R  12 -
-   Roger McCluskey 13 -
-   Tom Bigelow 14 -
-   Phil Threshie 17 -
-   John Martin DNQ 18 -
-   Eldon Rasmussen 23 -
-   Larry Dickson 24 -
-   Dick Simon 26 -
-   Sheldon Kinser 28 -
-   Bob Harkey DNQ 29 -
-   Cliff Hucul 29 35 -
-   Dennis Firestone  R  31 -
-   Johnny Parsons 32 33 -
-   George Snider 33 -
-   Janet Guthrie 34 -
-   Jim McElreath 35 -
Pos Driver PHX
 
ATL
 
INDY
 
TRT
 
MIC
 
WGL
 
TRT
 
ONT
 
MIC
 
ATL
 
PHX
 
Pts
Color Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green 4th & 5th place
Light Blue 6th-10th place
Dark Blue Finished
(Outside Top 10)
Purple Did not finish
(Ret)
Red Did not qualify
(DNQ)
Brown Withdrawn
(Wth)
Black Disqualified
(DSQ)
White Did not start
(DNS)
Blank Did not
participate
(DNP)
Not competing
In-line notation
Bold Pole position
Italics Ran fastest race lap
* Led most race laps
 RY  Rookie of the Year
 R  Rookie

Driver breakdownEdit

Pos Driver Team/Car Owner Starts Wins Podiums Top 5s Top 10s Poles Points
1   Mears   Team Penske 14 3 9 13 14 2 4,060
2   B. Unser   Team Penske 14 6 9 12 13 7 3,820
3   Johncock   Patrick Racing 14 2 5 9 11 2 2,211
4   Rutherford   Team McLaren 14 2 5 8 9 2 2,163
5   A. Unser   Chaparral Cars 14 1 4 8 10 1 2,085
6   Ongais   Interscope Racing 13 0 0 2 6 0 1,473
7   T. Sneva   Jerry O'Connel Racing 14 0 2 6 8 0 1,360
8   Bagley   Longhorn Racing 13 0 0 2 12 0 1,208
9   Dallenbach   Patrick Racing 14 0 1 5 8 0 1,149
10   Mosley   All American Racers 12 0 2 2 3 0 1,126
11   Andretti   Team Penske 1 0 1 1 1 0 700
12   Kunzman   Conqueste Racing Team 8 0 1 1 3 0 490
13   Carter   Morales Motorsports 13 0 0 0 6 0 452
14   Schuppan   Wysard Racing 8 0 0 0 2 0 449
15   Alsup (R)   WASP Racing/Team Penske/Gehlhausen Racing 13 0 0 0 6 0 400
16   Saldana   Hoffman Racing 13 0 0 0 4 0 368
17   Gehlhausen   Gehlhausen Racing/Bob Fletcher Racing 14 0 0 0 2 0 343
18   Walther   Walmotor 8 0 0 0 4 0 314
19   Krisiloff   Bob Fletcher Racing/Patrick Racing/Longhorn Racing 10 0 0 0 2 0 279
20   Frantz   Frantz Racing 7 0 0 0 1 0 236
21   J. Sneva   Hodgdon Racing 2 0 0 0 0 0 155
22   Richmond   Mach 1 Racing/S&M Electric 5 0 0 0 1 0 112
23   Rice   S&M Electric 5 0 0 0 2 0 105
24   Johnson   Mergard Racing 2 0 0 0 1 0 98
25   Mahler   Intercomp 6 0 0 0 0 0 74
26   Loquasto   Gehlhausen Racing 3 0 0 0 1 0 70
27   Cannon   Canon Racing 4 0 0 0 0 0 56
28   Ferguson   Hoffman Racing 3 0 0 0 0 0 35
29   Scott   Wheel Center 1 0 0 0 0 0 20
30   Caliva   Gehlhausen Racing 1 0 0 0 0 0 10

ReferencesEdit

  • Åberg, Andreas. "SCCA/CART Indy Car Series 1979". Driver Database. Retrieved 2009-05-19.
  • "1979 SCCA/CART Indy Car Series". Champ Car Stats. Retrieved 2009-05-19.
  • "Official Box Score: 63rd Indianapolis 500-Mile Race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway". Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Archived from the original on 14 May 2008. Retrieved 2009-05-19.
  • "Standings after Phoenix". Champ Car World Series. Archived from the original on 1 September 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-19.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Miller, Robin (January 7, 1979). "CART Announces New 8-Race Schedule". The Indianapolis Star. p. 28. Retrieved July 3, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. 
  2. ^ a b "Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph Archives, Jul 16, 1979, p. 17". NewspaperArchive.com. 1979-07-16. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  3. ^ "The Tennessean from Nashville, Tennessee on July 16, 1979 · Page 39". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  4. ^ "Fort Walton Beach Playground Daily News Archives, Jul 16, 1979, p. 10". NewspaperArchive.com. 1979-07-16. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  5. ^ "Clarion-Ledger from Jackson, Mississippi on August 6, 1979 · Page 56". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  6. ^ a b c "The Indianapolis Star from Indianapolis, Indiana on August 20, 1979 · Page 23". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2018-10-03.
  7. ^ "Mears Triumphs In Kitzler 150". Retrieved 2018-10-03.
  8. ^ a b "Bobby Unser Wins in California". Retrieved 2018-10-03.
  9. ^ "The Courier-Journal from Louisville, Kentucky on September 16, 1979 · Page 57". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2018-10-03.
  10. ^ a b "Lansing State Journal from Lansing, Michigan on October 1, 1979 · Page 24". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2018-10-04.
  11. ^ "Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York on October 21, 1979 · Page 87". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2018-10-04.
  12. ^ "Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona on October 21, 1979 · Page 4". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2018-10-04.