1941 Amateur World Series

The 1941 Amateur World Series was the fourth Amateur World Series, later known as the Baseball World Cup. It was contested by nine different teams playing eight games each from September 27 through October 22 in Havana, Cuba. Venezuela won the tournament for the first time.[1][2]

1941 Amateur World Series
Tournament details
Host country Cuba
Dates 27 September – 22 October
Teams9 (from 2 continents)
Venue1 (in 1 host city)
Defending champions Cuba (1940)
Final positions
Champions
Gold medal world centered.svg
 Venezuela (1st title)
Runner-up
Silver medal world centered.svg
 Cuba
Third place
Bronze medal world centered.svg
 Mexico
Fourth place Panama
Tournament statistics
Games played36
Most Valuable PlayerJosé Casanova
1940
1942

FormatEdit

All teams participated in a single-match round-robin, resulting in eight games for each team. In case of a tie for best record at the end of the round-robin, a single playoff game would be held to determine the overall winner.

ResultsEdit

1941 Amateur World Series
Champion Runners-Up Third Place
 
Venezuela
 
Cuba
1st award
 
Mexico

PlayoffsEdit

Playoff Game
   
1   Venezuela 3
2   Cuba 1

Final standingsEdit

Final Standings
Pos. Team W L RS RA
  1   Venezuela 8 1
  2   Cuba 7 2
  3   Mexico 6 2
4 (tied)   Dominican Republic 5 3
4 (tied)   Panama 5 3
6 (tied)   Nicaragua 2 6
6 (tied)   United States 2 6
8 (tied)   El Salvador 1 7
8 (tied)   Puerto Rico 1 7

PlayersEdit



  •   Mexico
    • Victor Canales hit five doubles to lead the tournament and would go on to play for several years in the minor leagues.



ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "1941 Amateur World Series". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.
  2. ^ Bjarkman, Peter (2007). A History of Cuban Baseball, 1864-2006. McFarland. ISBN 0786428295.
  3. ^ "Chucho Ramos". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.
  4. ^ "Andrés Fleitas". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.
  5. ^ "Rogelio Martínez". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.
  6. ^ "Julio Moreno". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.
  7. ^ "Tony Ordenana". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.
  8. ^ "León Kellman". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.
  9. ^ "Pat Scantlebury". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 21 March 2013.

External linksEdit