1890s Pacific typhoon seasons

This article encompasses the 1890s Pacific typhoon seasons.

1890 seasonEdit

 
season summary

There were 14 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1890.[1]

1891 seasonEdit

 
season summary

There were 18 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1891.[2]

1892 seasonEdit

There were 20 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1892.[3]

1893 seasonEdit

There were 20 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1893.[4]

1894 seasonEdit

There were 14 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1894.[5]

A typhoon in September killed 2,000 people in China.[6]

A tropical storm was first reported on October 1, which quickly moved westward across the Philippine archipelago. It moved northwestward through the South China Sea and slowed its forward motion. Over 27 hours, the system brought gale-force winds to Hong Kong, the longest duration as of 1955, due to the storm's slow movement and landfall on southern China on October 5. The storm also dropped 279.9 mm (11.02 in) of rainfall over 24 hours, making it the wettest storm in Hong Kong as of 1955. On the next day, the storm dissipated after turning to the northeast.[7][8][9]

1895 seasonEdit

There were 16 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1895.[10]

1896 seasonEdit

There were 18 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1896.[11]

A tropical cyclone was observed on July 26 to the east of the Philippines. The system moved quickly to the northwest, crossing the extreme northern Luzon island on July 28. Next day, the storm struck southeastern China near Hong Kong, dissipating on July 30.[12] At Hong Kong, where the storm produced winds of 128 km/h (79 mph) continuously for one hour, which was the highest hourly wind speed there as of 1955.[7][9]

1897 seasonEdit

There were 13 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1897.[13] Among these were a typhoon that struck the Philippines on October 7, which killed 1,500 people.[6]

1898 seasonEdit

There were 19 tropical cyclones in the western Pacific in 1898.[14]

1899 seasonEdit

There were 19 tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific in 1899.[15]

April + May

On April 23 a tropical storm was reported southeast of Guam. It moved northwest and passed very close to Guam before moving to the north. It dissipated on April 28.[16]

On May 18 a typhoon appeared to the east of Visayan Islands and moved inland on May 21. After crossing over into the South China Sea the storm moved northward. It passed through the Taiwan Strait between the 26 and 27 of May. On May 28 the storm was pushed out to sea by an advancing cold front and absorbed on May 29.[16][17]

June + July

On June 27 a typhoon was detected to the southeast of Manila. It passed to the south through central Luzon island during June 28. It continued northwest and made landfall on the island of Hainan (China) on July 1. The storm later dissipated inland near the borders of Vietnam and China on July 3.[18] There is some indication of damage at Sambonya, with a passing of a steamer noting all the buildings being nearly destroyed with few people seen.[19]

On July 2 a typhoon was spotted to the south of Okinawa Islands. It moved north over the following days, reaching violent intensities, it brushed past the islands to the east on July 6 and 7. It continued north reaching Japan by July 8, briefly moved into the Sea of Japan, and dissipated on the Korean Peninsula on July 10. A minimal pressure of 956 hPa (28.23 inHg) was recorded at Oshima.[16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  2. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  3. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  4. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  5. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  6. ^ a b Pedro Ribera, Ricardo Garcia-Herrera and Luis Gimeno (July 2008). "Historical deadly typhoons in the Philippines" (PDF). Weather. 63 (7): 196. Bibcode:2008Wthr...63..194R. doi:10.1002/wea.275. S2CID 122913766.
  7. ^ a b Jean Kan Hsieh; Chiao-min Hsieh (September 1955). Typhoons on the Southeastern Coast of China and Formosa (PDF) (Report). Massachusetts Institute of Technology. p. 42. Retrieved August 16, 2016.
  8. ^ https://ncics.org/ibtracs/index.php?name=v04r00-1894275N14132
  9. ^ a b "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2019-10-26. Retrieved 2020-09-03.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  11. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  12. ^ https://ncics.org/ibtracs/index.php?name=v04r00-1896209N14135
  13. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  14. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  15. ^ "IBTrACS - International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship".
  16. ^ a b c R. García-Herrera; P. Ribera; E. Hernández; L. Gimeno (2010). The Selga Chronology Part I: 1348-1900. Typhoons in the Philippine Islands 1566-1900 (Report). JGR - Atmospheres. Retrieved 2014-07-27.
  17. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2013). "1899 MISSING (1899144N15116) IBTrACS File". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  18. ^ National Climatic Data Center (2013). "1899 MISSING (1899180N16115) IBTrACS File". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  19. ^ "Arrival of a Japanese Steamer at Thursday Island". Queensland Times. 1899-07-13. Retrieved 2014-07-28.