1600 Vyssotsky

1600 Vyssotsky, provisional designation 1947 UC, is a rare-type Hungaria asteroid and suspected interloper from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 22 October 1947, by American astronomer Carl Wirtanen at Lick Observatory in California, United States.[20] It was named after astronomer Alexander Vyssotsky.[2]

1600 Vyssotsky
001600-asteroid shape model (1600) Vyssotsky.png
Shape model of Vyssotsky from its lightcurve
Discovery [1]
Discovered byC. A. Wirtanen
Discovery siteLick Obs.
Discovery date22 October 1947
Designations
(1600) Vyssotsky
Named after
Alexander Vyssotsky
(astronomer)[2]
1947 UC
main-belt · Hungaria[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc69.62 yr (25,427 days)
Aphelion1.9183 AU
Perihelion1.7793 AU
1.8488 AU
Eccentricity0.0376
2.51 yr (918 days)
199.42°
0° 23m 31.56s / day
Inclination21.173°
60.602°
50.543°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions6.29±0.89 km[4]
7.00 km (calculated)[3]
7.41±0.06 km[5]
7.413±0.057 km
7.50±0.50 km[6]
3.2±0.01 h[7]
3.201±0.001 h[8][9][10]
3.201±0.005 h[11]
3.2011±0.0004 h[12]
3.20116±0.00004 h[13]
3.20124±0.00004 h[14]
3.201264±0.00001 h[15]
3.20144±0.00002 h[14]
3.204±0.003 h[16]
3.205±0.003 h[17]
3.205±0.005 h[18]
0.3 (assumed)[3]
0.321±0.059[5]
0.46±0.23[4]
0.506±0.187[19]
0.547±0.076[6]
SMASS = A[1] · A[3]
11.90[6] · 12.50[4][5] · 12.7[1][3]

Classification and orbitEdit

Vyssotsky is a rare A-type asteroid. Based on its orbital characteristics, it is member of the Hungaria family, that form the last, innermost dense concentration of asteroids in the Solar System. However, due to its rare type, it is a suspected interloper, as Hungarias typically show a different E-type spectra.[17] It orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.8–1.9 AU once every 2 years and 6 months (918 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.04 and an inclination of 21° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] Vyssotsky's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation, as no precoveries were taken, and no prior identifications were made.[20]

LightcurvesEdit

Between 1999 and 2014, several rotational lightcurves of Vyssotsky were obtained by American astronomer Brian D. Warner at his Palmer Divide Observatory, Colorado (see video in § External links). Light-curve analysis gave a concurring rotation period of 3.201 hours with an averaged brightness variation of 0.18 magnitude (U=2/3/3/3/3/3).[7][9][10][12][15][17]

Additional well-defined lightcurves were obtained by astronomers Domenico Licchelli in November 2005 (U=3-),[8] Raymond Poncy, Raoul Behrend, René Roy, Reiner Stoss, Jaime Nomen, Salvador Sanchez also in November 2005 (U=3),[14] David Higgins in May 2007 (U=3),[13] Michael Lucas in November 2010 (U=2+),[11] as well as by Hiromi Hamanowa and Hiroko Hamanowa also in November 2010 (U=3).[14] The most recent photometric observation was made by Robert D. Stephens in September 2015, giving a period of 3.204 hours with an amplitude of 0.24 magnitude (U=3).[16] In spite of its many observations, Vyssotsky's spin axis and spin direction can not be determined with certainty.[17]

Diameter and albedoEdit

According to the surveys carried out by the Japanese Akari satellite, and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Vyssotsky measures between 6.29 and 7.50 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo between 0.321 and 0.547.[4][6][5][19] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.3 and calculates a diameter of 7.00 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 12.7.[3]

NamingEdit

This minor planet was named in honor of Russian–American astronomer Alexander Vyssotsky (1888–1973), who joined the faculty of the University of Virginia in 1923 and stayed at the McCormick Observatory on Mount Jefferson, Virginia, for 35 years. He was active in the fields of photometry, astrometry and spectral classification.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 20 February 1976 (M.P.C. 3931).[21]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1600 Vyssotsky (1947 UC)" (2017-06-03 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 June 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(1600) Vyssotsky". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1600) Vyssotsky. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 127. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_1601. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (1600) Vyssotsky". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 29 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b c d Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; et al. (December 2015). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 814 (2): 13. arXiv:1509.02522. Bibcode:2015ApJ...814..117N. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/814/2/117. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 17 October 2019. (online, AcuA catalog p. 153)
  7. ^ a b Warner, B. D. (December 1999). "Asteroid Photometry at the Palmer Divide Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 26.: 31. Bibcode:1999MPBu...26...31W. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  8. ^ a b Licchelli, Domenico (September 2006). "Lightcurve analysis of asteroids 300 Geraldina, 573 Recha, 629 Bernardina 721 Tabora, 1547 Nele, and 1600 Vyssotsky". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (3): 50–51. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...50L. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  9. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (July 2009). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2008 December - 2009 March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 36 (3): 109–116. Bibcode:2009MPBu...36..109W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  10. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (January 2011). "Upon Further Review: IV. An Examination of Previous Lightcurve Analysis from the Palmer Divide Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (1): 52–54. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38...52W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  11. ^ a b Lucas, Michael P.; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Fauerbach, Michael; Grasso, Salvatore (October 2011). "Lightcurve Analysis of Five Taxonomic A-class Asteroids". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (4): 218–220. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..218L. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  12. ^ a b Warner, Brian D.; Pray, Donald P.; Dyvig, Ron; Reddy, Vishnu (June 2006). "Lightcurve for Hungaria asteroid 1600 Vyssotsky over several apparitions". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (2): 45–46. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...45W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  13. ^ a b Higgins, David (March 2008). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Hunters Hill Observatory and Collaborating Stations: April 2007 - June 2007". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (1): 30–32. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...30H. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  14. ^ a b c d Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1600) Vyssotsky". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 29 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ a b Warner, Brian D.; Higgins, David; Pray, Donald P.; Dyvig, Ron; Reddy, Vishnu; Durech, Josef (March 2008). "A Shape and Spin Model for 1600 Vyssotsky". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (1): 13–14. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...13W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  16. ^ a b Stephens, Robert D. (January 2016). "Asteroids Observed from CS3: 2015 July - September". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (1): 52–56. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43...52S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  17. ^ a b c d Warner, Brian D. (July 2014). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2014 January-March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 41 (3): 144–155. Bibcode:2014MPBu...41..144W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  18. ^ Warner, Brian D. (April 2011). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2010 September-December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (2): 82–86. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38...82W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  19. ^ a b Gil-Hutton, R.; Lazzaro, D.; Benavidez, P. (June 2007). "Polarimetric observations of Hungaria asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 468 (3): 1109–1114. Bibcode:2007A&A...468.1109G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20077178. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  20. ^ a b "1600 Vyssotsky (1947 UC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 29 December 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. "Appendix – Publication Dates of the MPCs". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – Addendum to Fifth Edition (2006–2008). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 221. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-01965-4. ISBN 978-3-642-01964-7.

External linksEdit