Virginian EL-2B

  (Redirected from VGN EL-2B)

The Virginian Railway's class EL-2B comprised four two-unit electric locomotives with AAR (B+B-B+B)+(B+B-B+B) wheel arrangements. The locomotives were used on the 133-mile (214 km) electrified portion of the railroad, from Roanoke, Virginia to Mullens, West Virginia. These large motor-generator locomotives weighed 1,000,000 pounds (450 t), were 150 feet 8 inches (45.92 m) long, and were capable of producing 6,800 horsepower (5.1 MW).

Virginian EL-2B
VGN EL-2B.jpg
Virginian EL-2B, near Salem, VA., July 11, 1953
Type and origin
Power typeElectric
BuilderGE Erie Works
Build date1948
Total produced4
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte(4-4-4-4)+(4-4-4-4)
 • AAR(B+B-B+B)+(B+B-B+B)
 • UIC(Bo′Bo′)(Bo′Bo′)+(Bo′Bo′)(Bo′Bo′)
Gauge4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Wheel diameter42 in (1.1 m)
Length150 ft 8 in (45.92 m)
Width11 ft 1 in (3.38 m)
Height15 ft 6 in (4.72 m)
Adhesive weight1,000,000 lb (450 t)
Loco weight1,000,000 lb (450 t)
Electric system/s11 kV, 25 Hz AC
Current pickup(s)Pantograph
Traction motors16 × 500 hp (370 kW) GE 746
TransmissionAC Synchronous motors(2x)/
DC Generators(4x)/
DC traction motors(16x)
Train heatingNone
Loco brakeAir/Regenerative
Train brakesAir
Performance figures
Maximum speed35 mph (56 km/h)
Power output6,800 hp (5,100 kW)
Tractive effort162,000 lbf (720 kN)
Career
OperatorsVirginian Railway
ClassEL-2B
Number in class4
Numbers125–128
Delivered1948
Retired1959
DispositionAll scrapped by 1959

The EL-2B locomotives were built at General Electric's Erie works in 1948. Numbered 125–128, they were the largest two-unit electric locomotives used in North America.

The locomotives were retired and sold for scrap shortly after the 1959 merger of the Virginian with the Norfolk and Western Railway. None of the 4 examples built survived into preservation.

ReferencesEdit

  • Newton N. Gregg (1979). Train Shed Cyclopedia, No. 80: Locos of the 40s and 50s (Part 11) from the 1941 LOC CYC and Railway Mechanical Engineer. Newton K. Gregg. ISBN 978-0-87962-083-7.
  • "ELECTRICS IN THE SOUTHEAST". Retrieved 2009-03-29.