To'ak Chocolate

To'ak Chocolate is an Ecuadorian luxury chocolate company that was founded in 2013 by Jerry Toth, Carl Schweizer and Dennise Valencia. To’ak is pronounced Toe-Ahk.[1]  The luxury brand To'ak, produces chocolate with the very rare variety of Arriba cacao called Nacional cocoa,[2] which some experts formerly believed to be extinct.[3] It is said to have more floral notes and richness of flavors than any other cacao variety.[2][4] The Heirloom Nacional cacao bar produced by To'ak Chocolate is considered to be the most expensive chocolate bar in the world.[5]

DNA verified Heirloom Nacional cacao tree

Chocolate barsEdit

The chocolate bars are produced using the rare Nacional variety of cocoa bean, which some experts thought was extinct.[6][3] Groves of cocoa trees producing the Nacional variety were discovered in the valley of Piedra de Plata located in the mountains of the Arriba cacao-growing region of Ecuador, in the province called Manabi. DNA analysis confirmed that the beans were comprised purely of the Nacional genotype.[6][7][8]

 
To'ak Chocolate product example

The chocolate bar is handcrafted, and production involves fermenting the cocoa beans.[9][10][11][12] It has been considered to be one of the most expensive in the world, with prices ranging from $270-$375 for a 50-gram bar.[9][13][14][15][16][17] The chocolate bar is composed entirely of the Nacional cocoa bean, with a slight amount of cane sugar added.[6][13] In the middle of the bar is a single roasted cacao bean, showcasing the unadulterated flavor of Nacional Cacao and serving as a reminder where chocolate comes from.[18] To'ak chocolate is pure chocolate, not embellished with nuts, gold dust, or ganache, as is the case with some of the world's other expensive chocolates.[19] Each bar of chocolate comes in a Spanish Elm wooden box and has the individual bar number engraved in the back.[18][20]

The company's products include the Vintage 2014 edition that was aged for three years in a French oak cognac cask.[21] The company ages bars in wood casks and empty spirit casks.[22][23] They have been described as a "boundary-pushing chocolate company"[24] for launching a bar of dark chocolate that has been aged for 18 months in a 50-year-old Cognac cask.[25][26][27] They have also aged chocolate for two years in a Laphroaig Islay whisky cask.[28][29][30]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Welcome to the world of extreme chocolate and the duo that aim to restore the delicacy to its once sacred status". Retrieved 2017-12-19.
  2. ^ a b "What is Heirloom Cacao". hcpcacao.org. Retrieved 2017-12-19.
  3. ^ a b "GENETICS – NACIONAL CACAO CONSERVATION". nacionalcacaoconservation.org. Retrieved 2017-12-14.
  4. ^ Fabricant, Florence (2011). "Rare Cacao Beans Discovered in Peru". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-12-19.
  5. ^ "This is the world's most expensive chocolate bar". CNBC. Retrieved 2017-12-14.
  6. ^ a b c Scheffler, Daniel (September 30, 2015). "Fine chocolates now appreciated by connoisseurs as a luxury product". South China Morning Post. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  7. ^ Goldberg, Haley (October 31, 2015). "These high-end candies cost hundreds of dollars". New York Post. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  8. ^ "This chocolate bar costs $260". Fortune. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  9. ^ a b Kase, Aaron (September 26, 2016). "Stay on the Ecuador farm that produces the world's most expensive chocolate". The Guardian. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  10. ^ Kavilanz, Parija (February 12, 2015). "Is this the world's most expensive chocolate?". CNN Money. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  11. ^ Tufano, Lizzie Schiffman (December 2, 2014). "Why Does This Bar of Chocolate Cost $260?". Modern Farmer. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  12. ^ Conrad, Marissa (November 28, 2014). "At $173 An Ounce, Is This The World's Most Expensive Chocolate?". Forbes. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  13. ^ a b Virbilam, Irene S. (November 26, 2014). "This $260 chocolate bar might just be worth it". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  14. ^ Kitson, Melissa (April 5, 2016). "The Real Cost of Chocolate Is More Than You Think". Vice. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  15. ^ Karydes, Megy (November 7, 2014). "This chocolate bar costs $260". Fortune. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  16. ^ "The most expensive chocolate in the world". Al Bawaba (in Arabic). February 9, 2017. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  17. ^ "Would You Pay €315 for the World's Most Expensive Chocolate Bar? | TheTaste.ie". TheTaste.ie. 2016-10-03. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  18. ^ a b "Fine chocolates now appreciated by connoisseurs as a luxury product". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 2017-12-19.
  19. ^ "Here's what a $260 bar of chocolate looks like". Crain's Chicago Business. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  20. ^ "These high-end candies cost hundreds of dollars". New York Post. 2015-10-31. Retrieved 2017-12-19.
  21. ^ "Welcome to the world of extreme chocolate and the duo that aim to restore the delicacy to its once sacred status". Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  22. ^ "To'ak Chocolate". Touch of Modern. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  23. ^ "THE WORLD'S FIRST VINTAGE CHOCOLATE Aged for 18 months, launching for Easter 2016 – Luxuria Lifestyle". Luxuria Lifestyle International. 2016-03-12. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  24. ^ "THE WORLD'S FIRST VINTAGE CHOCOLATE Aged for 18 months, launching for Easter 2016 – Luxuria Lifestyle Dubai & Abu Dhabi". Luxuria Lifestyle Dubai & Abu Dhabi. 2016-03-12. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  25. ^ "To'ak Chocolate". Robb Report. 2017-09-07. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  26. ^ "To'ak Dark Chocolate, Aged for 18 Months in a Vintage Cognac Cask, Sells for $345 Per Bar". RealClearLife. 2017-02-27. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  27. ^ "Vintage Chocolate by To'ak for Easter". LUXUO. 2016-03-10. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  28. ^ "These $365 Chocolate Bars Might Be the Rarest in the World". Tasting Table. 2017-12-13. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  29. ^ Guide, Forbes Travel. "A Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide For Luxury Travelers". Forbes. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  30. ^ "Laphroaig Lore and To'ak Chocolate Contest – Laphroaig". Laphroaig. Retrieved 2017-12-15.

External linksEdit