The (206)

  (Redirected from The 206)

The (206) (styled “The [206]” on-screen) was a local sketch comedy television show in Seattle, Washington, broadcast by NBC affiliate KING-TV, that premiered on January 6, 2013. The show is broadcast on Sunday at 1:00 AM (Pacific), following Saturday Night Live. It was the successor to Almost Live! and much of the comedy is related to Seattle events and culture.[1]

The (206)
GenreComedy, Variety show
StarringChris Cashman
John Keister
Pat Cashman
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of episodes44 (3 specials)
Production
Executive producersErren Gottlieb
James McKenna
Production locationsSeattle, Washington
Bellevue, Washington
Running time22 minutes
Release
Original networkKING-TV
KONG-TV (Repeats)
Picture format1080i HDTV
Audio format5.1 Surround Sound
Original releaseJanuary 6, 2013 (2013-01-06) –
2015 (2015)
Chronology
Related showsAlmost Live!
The John Report with Bob
Up Late Northwest
External links
Website

After two initial episodes, the show left the schedule locally; however, it returned for a full season on April 27, 2013. The first season consists of 12 episodes, the last of which aired July 28, 2013. In addition, the "Not Especially Special, Special" was aired on July 7, 2013.

The second season began on November 16, 2013, and ended on May 3, 2014.

The third season began on October 18, 2014, but without John Keister; it was announced that he left the show to pursue other interests. He said he is now putting together a one-man show called The Keister Monologues.[2] It ended on May 2015.

The show was replaced in September 2015 with Up Late Northwest (but branded on air as Up Late NW), which retained the basic sketch comedy/guest format and cast, but the show can now be seen in cities throughout the Pacific Northwest, not just Seattle.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Buhain, Venice (12 July 2012). ""The (206)" Looks Almost Like "Almost Live"". Sammamish-Issaquah, WA Patch. Retrieved 19 February 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Don't panic: We found John Keister". Seattle Times. 2014-10-27.

External linksEdit