Technical Working Groups

Technical Working Groups (or TWGs) were created by the National Institute of Justice to create crime scene guides for state and local law enforcement.[1] The guides were individually developed by a separate Technical Working Group tasked with a single topic. The groups were a multidisciplinary group of content-area experts from across the United States. The groups included urban and rural jurisdictions as well as Federal agencies representatives. Each participating member was experienced in the area of crime scene investigation and evidence collection in the criminal justice system from the standpoints of law enforcement, prosecution, defense, or forensic science.

TopicsEdit

Technical Technology Working Group topics have included:[2]

  1. Aviation
  2. Biometrics
  3. Body Armor
  4. Communications
  5. Community Corrections
  6. DNA Forensics
  7. Electronic Crime
  8. Explosive Device Defeat
  9. General Forensics
  10. Geospatial Technologies
  11. Information-Led Policing
  12. Institutional Corrections
  13. Less-Lethal Technologies
  14. Modeling and Simulation
  15. Officer Safety and Protective Technologies
  16. Personal Protection Equipment
  17. Pursuit Management
  18. School Safety
  19. Sensors and Surveillance
  20. Weapons Detection

GuidesEdit

During the several years of their existence they developed numerous guides including the following:

  • Crime Scene Investigation: A Reference for Law Enforcement (pdf, 60 pages)[3] Published June 2004
  • Death Investigation: A Guide for the Scene Investigator (pdf, 72 pages)[4] Published November 1999
  • Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel (pdf, 73 pages)[5] Published June 2000
  • Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation (pdf, 64 pages)[6] Published July 2000
  • Electronic Crime Scene Investigation: A Guide for First Responders (pdf, 93 pages)[7] First Edition published July 2001, second edition published 2008[8]

The Technical Working Groups were designed to be short term in duration to respond to a topic. Longer term groups exists under other organizations such as the FBI's Scientific Working Group (SWG's) on Digital Evidence.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ National Institute of Justice, United States Department of Justice. "About NIJ". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ NIJ. "Current Technology Working Groups". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. ^ NIJ Technical Working Group. "Crime Scene Investigation: A Reference for Law Enforcement" (PDF). Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. ^ NIJ Technical Working Group. "Death Investigation: A Guide for the Scene Investigator" (PDF). Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  5. ^ NIJ Technical Working Group. "Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel" (PDF). Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  6. ^ NIJ Technical Working Group. "Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation" (PDF). Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  7. ^ NIJ Technical Working Group. "Electronic Crime Scene Investigation: A Guide for First Responders" (PDF). Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  8. ^ NIJ Technical Working Group. "Electronic Crime Scene Investigation: A Guide for First Responders" (PDF). Cite journal requires |journal= (help)