Simon Diedong Dombo

  (Redirected from S. D. Dombo)

Simon Diedong Dombo (1925–1998) was a Ghanaian politician, teacher and king. He was a Member of Parliament and the Parliamentary Leader during the first Republic of Ghana. As the Douri-Na,[1] he was reputed to be the first educated chieftain in the Upper Region of Ghana. He was one of the founders of the Northern People's Party. This later merged with the United Party. During the Second Republic, he was a member of the ruling Progress Party. He was Minister for Health and then Minister for Interior in the Busia government. He had more than 30 children.[2]

Duori Naa

Simon Diedong Dombo
Member of the Ghana Parliament
for Jirapa/Lambussie District
In office
1969–1972
Minister for Interior
In office
1969–1971
PresidentEdward Akufo-Addo
Prime MinisterKofi Abrefa Busia
Preceded byJohn Willie Kofi Harlley
Succeeded byNicholas Yaw Boafo Adade
Minister for Health
PresidentEdward Akufo-Addo
Prime MinisterKofi Abrefa Busia
Preceded byGibson Dokyi Ampaw
Duori Naa
In office
17 April 1949 – 19 March 1998
Personal details
Born1925
Died19 March 1998
NationalityGhanaian
Political partyNorthern People's Party
Other political
affiliations
United Party
Progress Party

He was banned from holding elected office by the Supreme Military Council prior to the 1979 elections.[3]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "NPP Has No Business Being Broke!". Editorial comment. ModernGhana. 14 October 2010. Retrieved 12 February 2013.
  2. ^ "The Late Chief of Duori C.S.Y.Dombo". Bonse. Retrieved 24 December 2012.
  3. ^ "ELECTIONS AND PUBLIC OFFICES DISQUALIFICATION (DISQUALIFIED PERSONS) DECREE, 1978 (SMCD 216)". SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL DECREE. Supreme Military Council. Retrieved 24 December 2012.
Parliament of Ghana
Preceded by
?
Member of Parliament
1957–65
Succeeded by
?
Preceded by
?
Member of Parliament
1969–72
Succeeded by
?
Political offices
Preceded by
John Willie Kofi Harlley
Minister for the Interior
1969–71
Succeeded by
Nicholas Yaw Boafo Adade
Preceded by
?
Minister for Health
1971– ?
Succeeded by
G.D. Ampaw